The Trial and Death of Socrates (Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Phaedo)
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The Trial and Death of Socrates (Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Phaedo)

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4.01 of 5 stars 4.01  ·  rating details  ·  16,573 ratings  ·  354 reviews
The third edition of The Trial and Death of Socrates presents G. M. A. Grube's distinguished translations, as revised by John Cooper for Plato, Complete Works (Hackett, 1997). A number of new or expanded footnotes are also included along with a select bibliography.
64 pages
Published June 1st 1980 by Hackett Pub Co Inc (first published -400)
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David
Jun 12, 2012 David rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition Recommends it for: all thinkers
When he was tried, convicted and ordered to death in 399 B.C.E., Socrates was already seventy years old: he had lived through the imperialistic spread of Athenian democracy and culture under Pericles, twenty-five years of first cold and then heated war with Sparta, the defeat of Athens in 404 B.C.E., the short-lived oligarchy imposed on that city by the Spartans, and finally the reestablishment of democracy in his homeland. During all of that time, the former bricklayer was known for practicing...more
Rowena
I was a bit wary going in but I was pleasantly surprised that this book wasn't as difficult to understand as I'd expected it to be.

The edition I read covered three dialogues about Socrates (Apologia, Crito and Phaedo), who was tried for supposedly corrupting the youth of Athens as well as for encouraging worship of gods not recognized by the State. I've always heard that Socrates was a powerful orator and the way he defended himself in front of the court proves that. Even when he was sentenced t...more
Daniel Silveyra
Socrates is a little bit like Superman. As a young man, both are very appealing for their heroism and pristine behavior. As one ages, however, they begin to dissatisfy - there is no way these people could be real.

This is obviously due to Plato's portrayal of the man, an homage so complete that Socrates becomes pure ideal and ceases to be human. He stands for intellectual honesty and curiosity, morality and justice, without any compromise.

This book is about as good an example of that as possible,...more
Erik Simon
(It seems odd to be allowed to give Plato a star rating.)

I'm not a scholar. I don't say that derisively. I have the highest admiration for scholars, their tireless and dogged pursuit, and any criticism I would level would be at their penchant to become rather narrow in their focus. But again, I'm not a scholar, I'm just a reader, and I have to say that as just a reader, I tend to surprise myself by the books I'll go ahead and read. To wit, this one. Why, at the age of forty-four, with no real re...more
Jeremy
I wish I had read these 4 dialogues before they made us work through The Republic back in school. Plato can seem so distant and archiac so much of the time, but here there is an actual sense of human urgency: Socrates is about to die. A lot of times the dialogues feel completely neutered from any real world concern, you just see these people walking around, having their abstract little discussions as Socrates schools them all. But here you see those discussions finally grounded by a frank acknow...more
Trevor
Jul 07, 2007 Trevor rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition Recommends it for: everyone
Shelves: philosophy
The world needs a superhero.

The name of that superhero is Socrates.

What do you mean you've never read this book - what the hell are you waiting for?
Samara
Ok, classic texts with amazing and mind boggling philosophical discussions...

But I couldn't help but notice how much Sherlock Holmes was based on Socrates. The more I read, the more I concluded that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was at least somewhat inspired by the great, but annoying philosopher who sarcastically proved that everyone around him was an idiot and his best friend who recorded all the stories. Further evidence, Doyle paraphrases Plato.

After Socrates' forced suicide: "Such was the end of...more
Ken Moten
Since I have individually reviewed each dialogue concerning their content I will be personal here. I obviously enjoyed reading these dialogues. I was not only enlightened by them but moved as well in certain parts, more by Socrates' friends than the man himself. This really should be the jumping off point for anyone interested in philosophy because it sets the tone and you can compare every strand of philosophy after it against it. Plato did not create [western] philosophy obviously but he sure...more
Lucy Phelan
The portrayal of Socrates is so insightful, you can imagine being in Ancient Greece and having that terribly repetitive conversation with him. Plato has really captured the essence of his mentor and I find that absolutely astounding, more so, I feel compelled to read up about Socrates every time. To my amazement, his portrayal hasn't only bought Socrates to life but it has made him immortal, for thousands of years he has been living in this fantastically written piece of literature spreading his...more
Bram
Euthyphro: Tricky. May need to reread this one a couple times.

Apology: Here we get an impassioned plea for intellectual freedom plus the promotion of ethical and civil disobedience. Great stuff.

Crito: A little too much law and authority worship.

Phaedo: This is the ultimate existential dialogue. Plato's Socrates makes death seem even more enticing than do the monotheists (who seem to have taken a good deal from Plato). I find it easy to like a work that relates such optimism about immortality.
Julenew
There are some books that are beyond "liking" or "not liking." They exist on a completely different plain than the rest of literature. This is one of those books. You don't read "The Trial and Death of Socrates" to be entertained; whether you like it or not is completely immaterial. By reading it, you gain an appreciation for one of the greatest thinkers of all time, and a valuable window into the soul of humankind.

How can one possibly quanitfy and encapsulate that into three, four, or five star...more
Tony
THE TRIAL AND EXECUTION OF SOCRATES. (this ed. 1972) Plato. ****.
This work, although in a different version, was required reading for my first humanities course in college in 1957. Yes, there were colleges back then, and Plato was not one of my classmates. At the time, I’m not sure that I fully understood what I was reading, but made sure that I understood enough to pass any quiz – announced or unannounced. On re-reading it, I came to the realization that Socrates was not a philosopher. He was...more
Tan Yi Han
I'm still on the last chapter (Phaedo), but I've run out of time. Have to return the book. So let me review based on the first 3 chapters.

This book uses a very original style of writing to give readers an inside look into the life and wisdom of Socrates in his last days.

Socrates liked to examine people. But he wasn't concerned about their appearance. He liked to examine people who thought themselves wise/clever and see if they really are.

His tool? A method of argument called the elenchus. Unlik...more
theduckthief
“Such was the end of our friend, Socrates, a man who, we would say, was the best of all those we've experienced and, generally speaking, the wisest and the most just."

This book is a collection of four dialogues about the last days of the philosopher, Socrates. Through them readers get to know Socrates, his friends and the people who condemned him. The philosophical arguments presented are both straightforward and complex. They address issues of death, the immortality of the soul and the purpose...more
Trudy
I absolutely love this little booklet. It is the third time I've read it and each time I find something new to contemplate. I whole heartedly agree with Socrates, "I say that it is the greatest good for a man to discuss virtue every day and those other things about which you hear me conversing and testing myself and others, for the unexamined life is not worth living" (39)
Ahmad
روایتی از محاکمه «سقراط» است در سه بخش: «اوتیفرن یا در باره ی تقدس»، «دفاعیه ی سقراط»، و «کریتون یا وظیفه ی شهروندی». بانوی مترجم، نسخه فرانسه کتاب «محاکمه سقراط» نوشته «افلاطون» را ترجمه کرده اند. ا. شربیانی
Alex
You know, Socrates was kindof a dick.
Jim
The Last Days of Socrates consists of four dialogues that, while discussing different philosophical issues, cover the end of Socrates' life from just before his trial to his condemnation and death of poison by drinking hemlock. In the end, the philosopher's pupil Crito says, "Such, Echecrates, was the end of our comrade, who was, we may fairly say, of all those whom we knew in our time, the bravest and also the wisest and most upright man."

Euthyphro and Crito are the lesser of the four dialogues...more
David Sarkies
Apr 16, 2014 David Sarkies rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition Recommends it for: Lovers of Wisdom
Recommended to David by: David Hester
Shelves: philosophy
Thoughts from Socrates' trial and execution
13 October 2012

While I have written commentaries on collections before I have since tried to steer away from doing that to instead write about the individual pieces contained therein. Okay, in one way it does help to bump up the number of books on my shelf, but then again that is somewhat irrelevant (It's not as if I win a prize if I have the most books on my shelf, or the most reviews). Generally I find it better to comment on the individual pieces be...more
David
This should be mandatory reading for all in the Western World. This is Plato's account of Socrates' trial and subsequent death. I thought the courtroom drama was fantastic; however, after the death sentence was pronounced on Socrates, his dialogue with his followers regarding death got too philosophic at points for my taste. Socrates seems to be at peace with death and the destination of his soul.

One thing I found to be humorous and profound was that after Socrates gave his dissertation on deat...more
Alex Woods
I read the "Apology" portion of this work. My first reaction to Socrates' Apology was one of awe. I have yet to pinpoint exactly what gave me such a reaction, but the combination of Plato's writing and Socrates' ideas probably had something to do with it. On a basic level, I really enjoyed getting insights into the structure of the Ancient Greek political and social systems. For me, the genius of Socrates' Apology is that he is able to effectively apply pure logic in a world where a less logical...more
Fernando Álvarez
Dialogos I de Platón comprende la Apología de Sócrates y Fedón.

La Apología de Sócrates narra el juicio de muerte que se le imputa al mencionado personaje por "penetrar en los misterios del cielo y de la tierra", y enseñarlos públicamente. Sócrates es acusado de corrupción de menores y de creer en los demonios, siendo condenando a muerte. Pero para él, morir así era la suprema sanción a su doctrina y el último acto necesario de su destino. Sócrates pensaba una de dos cosas: o la muerte es un ano...more
Eric
When your Introduction to Philosophy (or to Humanities, or to Rhetoric, or to...) course had you read this your first semester of college, it was presented as the origins of Western thought. With all that reverence paid, reading it a decade and a half later, I either didn't remember or didn't understand that "The Apology" is downright funny. Socrates is a man daring a court to put him to death and he is very keen on putting them in their place.

Alas, the other dialogues aren't nearly as engaging,...more
Anom Astika
Aku sedang membaca buku ini dan sedang menerjemahkannya. Ada empat teks Plato di sana yaitu Euthyphro, Apology, Crito dan Phaedo. Semuanya teks teks yang luar biasa, dan jika direnung-renungkan ada banyak hal yang tetap relevan hingga saat ini. Lebih lebih jika kita kini sedang sibuk sibuk punya perhatian terhadap kekerasan berbasis agama, maka teks Euthyphro sangat menarik untuk dibaca. Pada teks ini Socrates berdebat dengan Euthyphro, salah seorang jaksa pemeriksa untuk Pengadilan Socrates. In...more
David Haley
Sep 03, 2007 David Haley rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition Recommends it for: Anyone interested in politics, morality, ancient greek society etc.
I just finished my second read of this book, (including the Euthyphro, Apology, etc--the whole shebang), and while the style seemed a bit loquacious for my taste at first, I feel like I am beginning to appreciate Plato. I will say though, I do have a hard time accepting how easily Plato, as author, could have (and probably did) manipulate the various arguments.

One facet I particularly enjoyed was the manner in which Socrates vehemently antagonizes his accusers. With little effort, he could have...more
Ryan Kaufman
In my ignorance, I always thought of Plato and the other Ancient Greek philosophers as enemies to the Christian faith, even though they had some good ideas here and there. After reading this book (my first book by Plato or Aristotle) I realized how silly that was, as Socrates (Plato's mouthpiece), though a polytheist, very often has ideas that are very compatible with the true nature of reality, and both implicitly and explicitly expresses his beliefs about what sounds like a sovereign and singl...more
Rene
This book was a fantastic example of owning up to your beliefs, values, and standards. I really should give it a re-visit... I wish I could remember where I put it... =P
Further- people who read about Socrates' death will be either of these two types: (a) those who believe Socrates accepted the death penalty to ease the pain of his old age; a "quick and painless death" so to speak... or (b) those who believe he saw a life of exile to be insignificant and cowardly; and agreeing to the false charge...more
Regina Lindsey
The Last Days of Socrates by Plato
4 Stars

Little historical evidence survives regarding Socrates. The most well-known source is from his pupil, Plato. Through four dialogues, Plato describes the circumstances surrounding Socrates’ indictment, his trial, his imprisonment, and his death.

At the age of seventy, Socrates was tried, convicted, and sentenced to death on two charges – encouraging the worship of gods not recognized by the state and corrupting the youth of Athens. Socrates argued his own...more
Steve Hemmeke
It was very jarring to read Plato, after 10 years or so of self-consciously affirming the goodness of God's physical world. The material and sensory is not something to flee as a hindrance to the soul, though it can be that.

For all his careful argumentation, Socrates asserts some whoppers. How do you get from the essence of the soul being life, to the soul must be immortally alive? Faced with his own death, one would think it's possible to believe that a thing can be alive now, yet not be everla...more
Lia
Have I ever mentioned that I love Socrates? Well, I do. The dialogues written by Plato about his teacher are my favorite of all philosophy from that era. Yes, I like Plato, too. And Aristotle isn't too bad. But, for me, there's only one philosopher: Socrates. I find his dialogues inspiring.
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  • The Nicomachean Ethics
  • Early Greek Philosophy
  • An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding
  • Discourse on Method and Meditations on First Philosophy
  • Twilight of the Idols/The Anti-Christ
  • On the Republic/On the Laws
  • The Problems of Philosophy
  • The Art of Living: The Classical Manual on Virtue, Happiness and Effectiveness
  • Readings in Ancient Greek Philosophy: From Thales to Aristotle
  • The Enneads
  • On Liberty
  • The Rise and Fall of Athens: Nine Greek Lives
  • Meditations
  • Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals (Texts in the History of Philosophy)
  • Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus
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Plato was a Classical Greek philosopher, mathematician, student of Socrates, writer of philosophical dialogues, and founder of the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world. Along with his mentor, Socrates, and his student, Aristotle, Plato helped to lay the foundations of Western philosophy and science.

Plato was one of the most important Western philosophers...more
More about Plato...
The Republic The Symposium Apology Five Dialogues: Euthyphro/Apology/Crito/Meno/Phaedo Complete Works

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