Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Making Sense of Taste: Food & Philosophy” as Want to Read:
Making Sense of Taste: Food & Philosophy
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Making Sense of Taste: Food & Philosophy

3.81  ·  Rating Details ·  32 Ratings  ·  3 Reviews
Taste, perhaps the most intimate of the five senses, has traditionally been considered beneath the concern of philosophy, too bound to the body, too personal and idiosyncratic. Yet, in addition to providing physical pleasure, eating and drinking bear symbolic and aesthetic value in human experience, and they continually inspire writers and artists.

In Making Sense of Taste,
...more
Paperback, 232 pages
Published September 19th 2002 by Cornell University Press (first published 1999)
More Details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about Making Sense of Taste, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about Making Sense of Taste

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  Rating Details
Stephen
Sep 29, 2012 Stephen rated it really liked it
Not everyone has a taste for philosophy and most academic philosophers write in a manner which requires a lot of chewing before swallowing. Carolyn Korsmeyer has done the field of aesthetics (a discipline on the ingredient list of philosophy) a great service with her book Making Sense of Taste. For 2500 years, the sense of taste has been accorded less importance on the hierarchy of human senses than the "higher senses" of sight and hearing. She begins with the earliest Greek and Roman philosophe ...more
Andrew Spear
Mar 24, 2008 Andrew Spear rated it really liked it
A very interesting discussion of taste in what is arguably its most literal and primary sense: the taste for food and drink, as opposed to (so the history tells us) the aesthetic sense of taste, which is supposed to be analogous to but more sophisticated than literal taste, having for objects, as it does, works of visual art, music and literature.

I began reading this book on the airplane during my last trip to Europe (nothing like reading about taste as an aesthetic phenomenon while eating airl
...more
Louis
May 29, 2010 Louis rated it really liked it
Shelves: philosophy, food
A very spirited effort to dislodge the sense of taste from the bottom of the sense hierarchy, a position that Plato and Aristotle gave it. Though focusing heavily on aesthetics and pleasure, Korsmeyer argues well for re-thinking food as a more legitimate topic of philosophical study.
Rebecca
Rebecca rated it really liked it
Sep 27, 2015
KDB
KDB rated it really liked it
Dec 20, 2012
Elizabeth Herbert
Elizabeth Herbert rated it it was ok
Sep 15, 2012
Benjamin Sanchez
Benjamin Sanchez rated it it was amazing
Nov 25, 2016
Ryan
Ryan rated it it was amazing
Feb 02, 2011
Lucas
Lucas rated it really liked it
Feb 23, 2015
Ruta
Ruta rated it really liked it
Dec 29, 2015
Marieke
Marieke rated it really liked it
Jul 30, 2008
janice
janice rated it really liked it
Apr 09, 2007
Pauline
Pauline rated it really liked it
Jul 29, 2013
Eric Dowdle
Eric Dowdle rated it really liked it
Mar 23, 2010
unperspicacious
unperspicacious rated it really liked it
May 20, 2014
Rutger-Jan
Rutger-Jan rated it really liked it
Aug 08, 2016
Art Posocco
Art Posocco rated it really liked it
Apr 29, 2015
Jessica
Jessica rated it it was amazing
May 23, 2010
John
John rated it really liked it
Feb 02, 2015
Alexandra
Alexandra rated it it was amazing
Sep 19, 2010
Juneko
Juneko rated it really liked it
Jan 25, 2010
Joseph
Joseph rated it it was ok
Jan 17, 2014
Iya Lene
Iya Lene rated it really liked it
Apr 17, 2013
Esteban Casas Vázquez
Esteban Casas Vázquez rated it really liked it
Oct 16, 2016
Maysan
Maysan rated it liked it
Jan 10, 2013
Cristina
Cristina rated it it was amazing
May 20, 2014
Patrick
Patrick rated it it was ok
Jul 23, 2012
Michaela
Michaela rated it liked it
Jan 07, 2009
Samantha Siciliano
Samantha Siciliano rated it liked it
Oct 18, 2013
Michelle
Michelle rated it really liked it
Dec 21, 2013
« previous 1 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »
Dr. Carolyn C. Korsmeyer is Professor of Philosophy at the State Univesity of New York at Buffalo. Her chief research areas are aesthetics and emotion theory, and she writes in the areas of philosophy of art, feminist philosophy, and emotion theory.
More about Carolyn Korsmeyer...

Share This Book