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Note to Sixth-Grade Self
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Note to Sixth-Grade Self

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4.47  ·  Rating Details ·  30 Ratings  ·  4 Reviews
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Lisa
Apr 20, 2016 Lisa rated it it was amazing
Articulates the tough love an older self gives to her fledgling self, pushing, directing, helping to put her pre-adolescent pain into perspective.

The author does a great job of capturing overarching themes of adolescence and social hierarchy, using dance as a metaphor for identity and bending barriers. Nice touch with the hybrid peas to demonstrate that the hierarchy can be cross pollinated.

Also demonstrates the randomness of dominance when a "popular" girl has a stutter but manages to defy wh
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Jane
Nov 30, 2008 Jane rated it liked it
Shelves: short-stories
Great outlines of adolescence: remembering those childhood dramas, the larger than life moments, hierarchy of power within the teen social structure, the competition, drama, (oh the drama!), the mean tricks kids play. The commanding voice is interesting and adds a little hustle to the tone, like the situation must be handled immediately or your life is absolutely over—and it is to kids at this age, so it works.
Mette
May 14, 2012 Mette rated it liked it
I read it in school and and first time I found it both unrealistic and slightly boring. BUT after I had been reading it a couple of times and felt like I knew the characters, it ended up being a good text with other dimensions. However still with a bit of a boring and predictable plot.
Parksy
Sep 17, 2010 Parksy rated it it was amazing
Shelves: short-stories
I loved this short story - just beautiful. Captures the villainy of childhood without a single misstep.
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Julie Orringer is an American author born in Miami, Florida. Her first book, How to Breathe Underwater, was published in September 2003 by Knopf Publishing Group. She is a graduate of Cornell University and the Iowa Writers' Workshop and was a Stegner Fellow at Stanford University. Her stories have appeared in The Paris Review, McSweeney's, Ploughshares, Zoetrope: All-Story, The Pushcart Prize Ant ...more
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