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Complete Poetical Works of John Greenleaf Whittier
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Complete Poetical Works of John Greenleaf Whittier

3.78 of 5 stars 3.78  ·  rating details  ·  23 ratings  ·  3 reviews
In this volume, for the first time, is a complete collection of Whittier's poetical writings. There are pieces in this collection which the author would "willingly let die." It is now to late to disown them, and Whittier must submit to the inevitable penalty of poetical as well as other sins. There are others, intimately connected with the author's life and times, which ow ...more
Paperback, 328 pages
Published July 1st 2003 by Kessinger Publishing (first published January 1st 1892)
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Cory Schulz
John Greenleaf Whittier was an influential American and ardent advocate of slavery in the United States. In 1826, Whittier had his first poem published. Entitled "The Exile's Departure." the poem ran in the Newburyport Free Press. Abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison edited the paper and encouraged Whittier in his writing. In the 1830’s he gave lectures against slavery and wrote poems supporting abolition. Later in life he wrote poems that were turned into hymns. In 1866 Whittier wrote “Snow-Boun ...more
Kristi
Note: I did not read this volume, but a selection of poems by John Greenleaf Whitter: "Ichabod," "Massachusetts To Virginia," "Maud Muller," "Snow-Bound: A Winter Idyl," and "Telling the Bees."

The opposition to slavery is a recurrent theme in Whitter's poetry. "Ichabod" is a biblical allusion to the disgrace of statesman Daniel Webster following his support of the Fugitive Slave Law, requiring citizens of Massachusetts to actively enforce the laws of slavery within the boundaries of their free
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Adriana
Another must have for your home library!
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John Greenleaf Whittier was an influential American Quaker poet and ardent advocate of the abolition of slavery in the United States. He is usually listed as one of the Fireside Poets. Whittier was strongly influenced by the Scottish poet, Robert Burns.
More about John Greenleaf Whittier...
Snow-Bound: A Winter Idyl Selected Poems The Poetry of John Greenleaf Whittier: A Readers' Edition Maud Muller Barbara Frietchie

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“So all night long the storm roared on:
The morning broke without a sun;
In tiny spherule traced with lines
Of Nature’s geometric signs,
In starry flake, and pellicle,
All day the hoary meteor fell;
And, when the second morning shone,
We looked upon a world unknown,
On nothing we could call our own.
Around the glistening wonder bent
The blue walls of the firmament,
No cloud above, no earth below,—
A universe of sky and snow!”
12 likes
“And still we love the evil cause
And of the just effect complain;
We tread upon life's broken laws
And murmur at our self-inflicted pain.”
6 likes
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