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The Women Who Knew Too Much: Hitchcock and Feminist Theory
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The Women Who Knew Too Much: Hitchcock and Feminist Theory

4.04  ·  Rating Details ·  127 Ratings  ·  8 Reviews
Although Alfred Hitchcock's films have been central to the formulation of feminist film theory, and to the practice of feminist film criticism, there has never been a book-length feminist study of a director whose cinematic treatment of women has been notoriously controversial.

In The Women Who Knew Too Much, Tania Modleski claims that critical approaches to Hitchcock have
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Paperback, Second Edition, 185 pages
Published September 1st 2005 by Routledge (first published 1988)
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(showing 1-30)
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Jessica
Jul 14, 2010 Jessica rated it it was amazing
Shelves: academic, feminist, film
I love this book with the burning passion of a thousand fiery suns. Seriously. It's that good.
Blair
Aug 30, 2013 Blair rated it it was amazing
Shelves: non-fiction, art, film
Modleski gives a unique, exacting and complex feminist reading of Hitchcock's work. She isn't afraid to take titans like Laura Mulvey and Robin Wood to task, while still treating them in high regard. This even-handed approach dovetails with her thesis: Critical analysis of Hitchcock tends to end up labelling the director's work as either misogynist for his treatment of female characters or sympathetic to their subordination. Modleski works hard to complicate this tradition by showing how ...more
Teresa
May 11, 2012 Teresa rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I had to pick this up as a reading for one of my film studies classes on the subject of Hitchcock's film Vertigo and it provided a fairly detailed criticism and analysis on the construction of female characters for male characters and spectators.

Modleski is able to discuss the ways in which Hitchcock portrays femininity and the idea that it is a male construct, created in order to fulfill the male desire, as well as discussing aspects of voyeurism and patriarchal ideologies associated with these
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Kenneth Lota
Nov 04, 2013 Kenneth Lota rated it really liked it
This book as a whole serves a useful response to Laura Mulvey's "Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema," the article which basically kicked off both feminist film criticism and a great deal of Hitchcock scholarship. Modelski is more nuanced in her assessment of Hitchcock's work than Mulvey was, giving Hitchcock more credit on gender issues and paying more careful attention to the films themselves.
Hana K
Aug 20, 2015 Hana K rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: uni-reading-list
Overall pretty interesting with some really good points and solid references but I felt like there lacked a good conclusion - or rather everything wasn't tied up, summarised, and ended in a comprehensive final paragraph(s).
Dan Humphrey
Feb 10, 2013 Dan Humphrey rated it it was amazing
Still one of the best books in feminist film studies. Should be required reading for anyone wanting to combine these two fields in their own scholarly work. Oh, it's very entertaining, too.
Orla
Sep 21, 2013 Orla rated it really liked it
Shelves: feminism, film-or-tv
Modleski buys into Freudlian/Lacanian psychoanalysis more than I would but she argues well and uses rational thought, a rare gift among film scholars.
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