The Mystery of the Hidden House (The Five Find-Outers, #6)
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The Mystery of the Hidden House (The Five Find-Outers #6)

3.93 of 5 stars 3.93  ·  rating details  ·  1,153 ratings  ·  13 reviews
Where could Mr Goon's nephew have disappeared to? Mr Goon has forbidden the Five Find-Outers from solving mysteries - so they decide to make one up for his nephew, Ern! But what will happen when Ern disappears, and their pretend mystery turns into a real one?
Paperback, 249 pages
Published 2003 by Egmont Books Limited (first published 1948)
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81st out of 110 books — 30 voters


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Mike Chaston
Ern is a great addition (who I very much doubt attends a boarding school)... and it's the winter hols so no ices in this story. Larry, Daisy and Pip continue as character shadows to Fatty and Bets. As a historical read I like the two references to the 'Last War'.
Yasoda Sriwardana
Reading the childhood favourites once again :)
Jhosa
A fun read for children
Andi Garbett
A thrilling story with lots of unexpected twists
Kirsti
The Find outers banned from hunting down mysteries! What sorcery is this! Looks like Fatty will have to go it alone, and in the process of tricking Goon's clumsy nephew Ern he stumbles across a doozy! The others help when they can, and Fatty of course uncovers a stolen car ring and catches the crooks. Typical Enid Blyton fun, good guys vs the bad guys. I do love this series- it's simply smashing!
felicia summers
I love this book. A must read.
GOURI
I read it while I was in the hospital with pneumonia.I loved this book so much since it was the only thing I had close to entertainment.Still,it was cool!
Noora
Samaa Salaisuus-laatua kuin muutkin sarjan osat.
Roze
One of my childhood favourites! <3
Blythe
Woo Hoo another
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Born in 1897 in South London, Enid Mary Blyton was the eldest of three children, and showed an early interest in music and reading. She was educated at St. Christopher's School, Beckenham, and - having decided not to pursue her music - at Ipswich High School, where she trained as a kindergarten teacher. She taught for five years before her 1924 marriage to editor Hugh Pollock, with whom she had tw...more
More about Enid Blyton...
The Magic Faraway Tree (The Faraway Tree, #2) The Enchanted Wood (The Faraway Tree, #1) Five on a Treasure Island (Famous Five, #1) The Faraway Tree Stories (The Faraway Tree #1-3) The Folk of the Faraway Tree (The Faraway Tree, #3)

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“Mothers were much too sharp. They were like dogs. Buster always sensed when anything was out of the ordinary, and so did mothers. Mothers and dogs both had a kind of second sight that made them see into people's minds and know when anything unusual was going on.” 13 likes
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