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What Things Do: Philosophical Reflections on Technology, Agency, and Design
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What Things Do: Philosophical Reflections on Technology, Agency, and Design

3.76 of 5 stars 3.76  ·  rating details  ·  21 ratings  ·  5 reviews
Our modern society is flooded with all sorts of devices: TV sets, automobiles, microwaves, mobile phones. How are all these things affecting us? How can their role in our lives be understood? What Things Do answers these questions by focusing on how technologies mediate our actions and our perceptions of the world.

Peter-Paul Verbeek develops this innovative approach by fir
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Paperback, 249 pages
Published September 1st 2005 by Penn State University Press (first published 2000)
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John Carter McKnight
Excellent literature review, critique and theory in the philosophy of technology. Verbeek falls into a good spot for me in his critique of actor-network theory (things and humans are *not* the same sorts of actants), anti-technology romanticism (against it), the social impact of consumer technology (let's be specific, and analyze pros and cons adequately).

Verbeek borrows from early Heidegger (and his analysis of Heidegger's changing thinking about artifacts, along with his critique of ANT, is on
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Bryan Kibbe
This is an excellent addition to the growing body of work in the philosophy of technology. If you have read work by Don Ihde, Albert Borgmann, Bruno Latour, and/or Martin Heidegger then you are sure to appreciate Verbeek's synthesis of these authors into what he calls a "postphenomenolgy" of material technologies. Verbeek's writing is exceptionally clear, and he handles the summary and assimilation of these diverse thinkers well. Without constantly introducing new material, Verbeek frequently re ...more
Samantha
Definitely a great read for all Industrial Designers. I'm currently rereading this, after finding my very own hard copy.
Gaurang Desai
Fantastic introduction to philosophy and technology design. A difficult read but a must read for Industrial Designers
Guido De
Excellent literature review, critique and theory in the philosophy of technology.
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