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Fall of Light (LaZelle #2)

3.21 of 5 stars 3.21  ·  rating details  ·  384 ratings  ·  64 reviews
Opal LaZelle is a special effects make-up artist, transforming actors into fantastical and grotesque creatures. Unknown to the casts and crews of the films she works on, Opal is gifted in the art of magic-and she applies more than make-up when altering an actor's features.

Her latest job requires turning Corvus Weather into a dark god of the forest. But when Corvus's perfo
Hardcover, 320 pages
Published May 5th 2009 by Ace Hardcover (first published March 30th 2009)
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(showing 1-30 of 683)
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Opal LaZelle is a makeup artist, specializing in monsters and the grotesque. She’s excellent at what she does—partially because she applies more than makeup to her creations. Because Opal comes from a magical family, where every member has magical gifts and abilities—and Opal can change someone’s face with a touch and a thought.

On the set of the horror movie Forest of the Night, Opal is in charge of Corvus Weather, the Dark God of the movie. But it soon becomes apparent that Corvus is sinking to
Just like everyone else who's reviewed this book so far, it seems, I loved A Fistful of Sky and was deeply disappointed in this sequel. Pretty much the only reasons that this isn't getting one star instead of two are that it's mostly not actively awful and there's nothing in it which hurts any of the joy of A Fistful of Sky. It's not worth reading alone or as that book's sequel, though.

For the curious: This is the story -- or rather, a too-short excerpt from the middle (not the end) of what migh
This book was highly frustrating to me. I was SO excited about it because I really enjoy Hoffman's books overall and when I saw it featured a character from A Fistful of Sky - my favorite novel of hers - I was all the more anxious to read it.

But I found it was a severe letdown. Opal let things get so far out of hand. She never asked for help and just kept going along with the events even when it looked like people might be in danger. When she finally does ask for help, she turns it down as soon
Dec 01, 2009 Alan rated it 3 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: Genre-benders
Recommended to Alan by: Contrarian cover assessment and prior experience with the name
That cover... a waif in the woods, pale in a snow-white shift, done in photorealistic and oversaturated style but airbrushed soft focus... you can just feel the girl cooties wafting off of this one. But.. marketing niches aren't everything, and Hoffman's a name who's known to me, so I picked it up anyway. And yeah, I'm glad I did.

Oh, it's not her best work—I remain more impressed by Hoffman's earlier straight fantasies, work like The Silent Strength of Stones (reviewed briefly elsewhere) or Fist
Part of the danger of being an impulsive book reserver at the local library is that you can easily forget why you put a book on reserve in the first place or what it was about a review or recommendation that initially drew your interest.

In most cases, reading the book I will recall what initially drew me to the book. But in a rare case, I'll read through an entire book and never remember what originally caught my eye.

That's the case when it comes to my initial motivation for "Fall of Light."

Opal is the oldest sibling in a family filled with Talents. Every one (excepting her father) has a magical gift; Opal's is to do with light and illusion. She broke free of her controlling mother and created a new identity for herself, as a movie make-up artist. Unfortunately, years of repressing her true feelings and abilities leave her vulnerable to the powerful forces haunting her latest movie set.

This book should have been fascinating and creepy--instead it was frustrating and boring. Opal n
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
I just finished this ARC last night. There's only one instance where the editor REALLY needs to catch an error--it brought me to a screeching halt.

The book kinda ends up in the air and other than Opal we see only Uncle Tobias (and talk to M&F and Flint on the phone), so this doesn't have the "feel" of the LaZelle novels. Plus I don't like Opal as much as Gypsum.

It's an excellent book, though!
I liked this story well enough but it didn't grab me like the prequel, A Fistful of Sky did. I also found the ending somewhat ambiguous and it took the wind out of the climax of the story. Having said all of this, I think that it's a must read for Nina Kiriki Hoffman fans which gives more depth to the character of Opal La Zelle.
Okay... what the heck!? Is this even a finshed story?

I absolutely love NKH and make it my mission to read as much of her work as possible. I hunt down every little short story I can find (and wow, there are a lot!), so I was so excited that #1 there was a new novel coming out and #2 it was based on the Lazelle's, which were in the first NKH novel I read (Fistful of Sky) and is one of my favorite novels of all time.

This story goes nowhere. Way too much time is spent on explaining the whole movie-
I was really excited when I saw Hoffman had written a follow-up to Fistful of Sky. Unfortunately, this novel doesn't live up to the promise of the earlier story of magically inclined siblings. Opal LaZelle is now living apart from her family working as a makeup artist on a horror movie. Her makeup turns out a little too good and leads to the main actor being possessed by some sort of spirit. If this is starting to sound confusing, it's because the book is kind of muddled. It also ends abruptly w ...more
The second book following the magical Lazelle family this time the older sister Opal who was a minor character in the last book.

Opal works as a special effects makeup artist with her power to be able to make things appear anyway she likes she's ideally suited to this sort of work. But when she makes up Corvus Weather into a dark god of the wood something else slips in with her magic and begins to take over Corvus and slowly the movie in general.

It's down to Opal to figure out what's going on and
I really enjoyed this, up until the ending. And then I thought, I can haz ending? Because the one here... let's just say I was confused, and looking for more pages to clear up the confusion, but alas, I had come to the end of the pages.

What is they say about not with a bang, but with a whimper? Yeah, that.
Kate Musselman
I've enjoyed Hoffman's in the past but this one was just problematic. The writing was sloppy and the plot held together only loosely. Teere were some good characters and concepts, but it didn't feel fully realized, and ultimately I just wasn't invested in the characters or the story.
Well-written but slow. Somewhat disappointing for NKH, though I think her short stories are way better than any of her novels anyways (except maybe for The Thread that Binds the Bones, which is fantastic)
Before I began this novel, I reread the first LaZelle book, A Fistful of Sky. Afterward, I found I had to wait a bit, because I had to get over my disappointment that this title, a sequel of sorts, did not feature Gypsum LaZelle, but instead centered on her older sister, Opal. I didn't want Opal. I wanted more Gypsum! So I gave it a little breathing room so it wouldn't suffer by comparison. Opal is the sister who left. While her siblings are tightly bound to their mother and home, Opal broke awa ...more
Katharine Herndon
I've loved Nina Kiriki Hoffman since "The Thread that Binds the Bones" and the short stories she used to write for "Fantasy & Science Fiction." But I don't think I've really connected with her last several books. I was excited when this came out, because it was a continuation of one of the characters from "A Fistful of Sky."

But it turned out to be unsatisfying in the same way "A Fistful of Sky" was, but more so. It's a coming of age story about older sister Opal, and since she has left the
Jeanne 'Divinae'
Usually it takes me less than a day to read a book. This book took me over a month. I was givin this book to proof read to see if it was (young adult) age appropriate. I usually like these types of books.

It was the most slow moving book, I have ever read. In fact, if I wasn't asked to read it, I would have just put it away and never finish it. It really didn't start to pick up until it was halfway through. Then it seemed to me they tried to add all this extra details in really fast. Then at the
Rena McGee
Fall of Light is an indirect sequel to A Fistful of Sky; it involves Opal LaZelle, Gypsum’s older sister, who works as a makeup artist. She uses her magical talents to enhance the effects of her work, and her talents are very much in demand. She’s working on location in Oregon for a horror movie, transforming her romantic interest Corvus Weather into the main monster/villain of Forest of the Night, a horror movie of the “secret witch-cult” variety which is deeply amusing, consider that Opal is f ...more
Nina Kiriki Hoffman's excellent fantasy works are about people who have unusual psychic powers. Within this setting, her work is perennially concerned with questions about the ethical use of power, and about how the use of power influences relationships among family, friends, and strangers. (Other SF/Fantasy authors who investigate these questions in interesting and startling ways include Zenna Henderson, Octavia Butler, and Sarah Zettel.) This book fits into her overall fascination with the use ...more
I only realized partway into Nina Kiriki Hoffman's Fall of Light that this was actually a sequel to a previous book: A Fistful of Sky. I elected to keep reading anyway, but I can't help but wonder if I'd read the other book first, whether this one would have made more sense.

This one's premise was promising, I thought: Opal LaZelle is a makeup artist working on a movie set, and she's got a thing for the man who's playing the monster of the movie. Only something awakens to possess him when Opal go
This is a sort-of sequel to A Fistful of Sky, focusing on Gyp's sister, Opal, who is a special effects makeup artist in the movie industry.

Unfortunately, it's widely different from the first book. Instead of having a strong family element, it focuses entirely on Opal and her co-workers, leaving the family (mainly Flint and Uncle Tobias) to appear in a couple of brief cameos. To compensate for the lack of family to talk to, it seems like nearly everyone figures out Opal is a witch. The lack of se
Warning, this book finishes really abruptly, and a stopping place rather than an ending place. For me, a less satisfactory ending than in A Red Heart of Memories, but I'm now hoping for a sequel to tie up the loose bits.

This follows but is not a sequel to Fistful of Sky, starring makeup effects artist Opal. It takes a while to find her story, which is similar to other women in Hoffman's world who have locked away a part of themselves and need to choose again and change into who they really want
I loved "A Fistful of Sky" so was excited to read this book set in the same world and the same family. However, I was a little disappointed with the flow of the book and Opal's character. I enjoyed learning more about the different types of magic, how Opal came to be the way she is now, but I felt that her actions fell flat. At one point, she asks herself how she has handled her issue (the possession of her love interest and star in the movie they are recording). She realizes she hasn't done wel ...more
I wanted to enjoy this book more than I dd. it had great potential but always seemed to be lacking in something. Either I didnt feel the emotions it was trying to convey or I felt like I had missed important details as I read. It is too bad, I feel the story had great potential.
My initial impression of this book turned out to be accurate. It just didn't grab me at all. I didn't feel like I had a good sense of the characters, and by and large the book felt weirdly incomplete, almost as though it was missing a few introductory chapters and a chapter or two of conclusion. It almost felt like a massively expanded short story.
This is disappointing, because I normally really enjoy Hoffman's novels, even the ones that don't seem entirely promising at first blush. This was sor
This is one of those times where I wish I'd glanced over the reviews before purchasing the book. The writing was mediocre. The plot meandered everywhere. The dialog between characters was unfocused and often just functioned as filler. And very little actually happened in the book to further the storyline, such as it was. In fact, what it reminded me of was my college days the night before a ten page paper was due and I had to BS my way through. I jimmied the margins a little, messed with the fon ...more
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Logan England
As much as I loved some of Nina Kiriki Hoffman's previous books, it almost causes me physical pain to admit that this is the second of hers in a row that I didn't really connect with. Too much was left unanswered, and Opal, the POV character, was infuriatingly passive through most of the book. This is the second book of Hoffman's in a row that I have to say, I don't have any idea what message we're supposed to take away from this story. The characters didn't grow or learn, and Opal's inner confl ...more
I wanted to like this book more. The hideous cover design certainly didn't help, but of course I don't hold that against the author--she had little or no say. Opal just didn't catch my sympathy very much, and the plot wandered into such strange territory that the somewhat abrupt ending didn't seem to fit and wasn't really satisfying. I liked Opal's explorations of her interior "rooms" and her interactions with Other Opal, who was so much more than her evil doppelganger. But I had recently reread ...more
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Nina Kiriki Hoffman’s first solo novel, The Thread That Binds the Bones (1993), won the Bram Stoker Award for first novel; her second novel, The Silent Strength of Stones (1995) was a finalist for the Nebula and World Fantasy Awards. A Red Heart of Memories (1999, part of her “Matt Black” series), nominated for a World Fantasy Award, was followed by sequel Past the Size of Dreaming in 2001. Much o ...more
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Other Books in the Series

LaZelle (2 books)
  • A Fistful of Sky  (LaZelle, #1)

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