Raised on Radio
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Raised on Radio

3.83 of 5 stars 3.83  ·  rating details  ·  24 ratings  ·  5 reviews
In the late 1920s radio exploded almost overnight into being America's dominant entertainment, just as television would do twenty-five years later. Gerald Nachman, himself a product of the radio years, takes us back to the heyday of radio, bringing to life the great performers and shows, as well as the not-so-great and not-great-at-all. Nachman analyzes the many genres tha...more
Paperback, 544 pages
Published August 23rd 2000 by University of California Press (first published 1998)
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Johnny
Reading Raised on Radio was simply supposed to be a pleasant diversion. I would be reminded of all of those old radio programs I used to listen to when KGO re-ran them as part of a regular late-night nostalgia show. I had been too young to experience “The Whistler,” “Mr. Keen, Tracer of Lost Persons,” or “The Fred Allen Show” when they were originally on the air and had only discovered “The Life of Riley,” “Father Knows Best,” “The Lone Ranger,” “Gunsmoke,” “Dragnet,” and “Sgt. Preston of the Yu...more
William
The 30-year meteoric rise and fall of radio's influence on our lives may not appeal to readers who have not actually had the opportunity to listen to old time radio. For those OTR fans, however, this book is encyclopedic in its coverage. The "thematic" coverage for each chapter (comedians, soaps, news, etc.) helps avoid a confusing chronological description of radio's entire gamut of stars and events.
Mike Jensen
Informative and entertaining survey of Old Time Radio programs and how they came together. The book is marred by some copy editing misses, a couple of muddled statements, and a few factual errors. It is good enough to render previous surveys unnecessary.
David
What starts as personal reminiscences about old time radio and the roll it played in the author's life turns into a very informative survey of the history of OTR.
Scott
Wonderful insights into the golden age of radio beloved the book
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