Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Socrates and the Three Pigs” as Want to Read:
Blank-133x176
Socrates and the Three...
 
by
Mitsumasa Anno
Rate this book
Clear rating

Socrates and the Three Pigs

3.5 of 5 stars 3.50  ·  rating details  ·  18 ratings  ·  7 reviews
A wolf's attempt to figure out in which of five houses he is most likely to find one of three little pigs introduces such mathematical concepts as combinatorial analysis, permutations, and probabilities.
Hardcover, 44 pages
Published April 18th 1986 by Philomel
more details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about Socrates and the Three Pigs, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about Socrates and the Three Pigs

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 39)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  rating details
Robin
Socrates the wolf enlists the aid of his friend Pythagoras the frog in deciding which of five houses the three little pigs might be in. Lots of math in this book that not all readers will get, but presented in a way that they can -- thought it will require a bit of effort. Love Anno's artwork and charactization of the thin, philosophical wolf and plump, charming pigs.
J-Lynn
This book is an odd retelling of the Three Little Pigs nursery rhyme that incorporates discussion of mathematics and probability. I don’t understand enough math to know if the formulas are sound, but there is an extensive author’s note that goes in depth into the math concepts.
Ali
Brilliant! The concepts of Permutation & Combination are not easy to explain to beginners. This book does it in an interesting way of storytelling. The philosophical touches are good. :) I liked Socrates' impatient wife's character
Prateek Goel
Brilliant! The concepts of Permutation & Combination are not easy to explain to beginners. This book does it in an interesting way of storytelling. The philosophical touches are good. :) I liked Socrates' impatient wife's character. :P
Wendee
Great visual way to teach probability and patterns. Socrates is the wolf, who over-analyzes... really funny, engaging story.
Elizabeth
The illustrations are beautiful but the math concepts are still confusing to me.
Catherine
A little boring. LOL!
Steven
Steven added it
Nov 26, 2014
Kate
Kate added it
Aug 05, 2014
Martin Skate
Martin Skate marked it as to-read
Nov 18, 2013
Libby
Libby marked it as to-read
Sep 27, 2013
Lydia Bozeman
Lydia Bozeman marked it as to-read
Mar 28, 2013
Lisa Redmond
Lisa Redmond marked it as to-read
Mar 22, 2013
Heathermcpheewalter
Heathermcpheewalter marked it as to-read
Jun 26, 2012
Andrea
Andrea marked it as to-read
Jun 24, 2012
Rose
Rose marked it as to-read
Apr 16, 2012
Junko
Junko added it
Dec 11, 2011
Marilyn
Marilyn marked it as to-read
Sep 26, 2011
Jill
Jill marked it as to-read
Sep 01, 2011
« previous 1 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »
72077
Mitsumasa Anno (born March 20, 1926) is a Japanese illustrator and writer of children's books, known best for picture books with few or no words. He received the international Hans Christian Andersen Medal in 1984 for his "lasting contribution to children's literature".

Source: Wikipedia.
More about Mitsumasa Anno...
Anno's Journey Anno's Counting Book Anno's Magic Seeds Anno's U.S.A. Anno's Alphabet

Share This Book