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The Winter of Red Snow: The Revolutionary War Diary of Abigail Jane Stewart, Vally Forge, Pennsylvania, 1777
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The Winter of Red Snow: The Revolutionary War Diary of Abigail Jane Stewart, Vally Forge, Pennsylvania, 1777 (Dear America)

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3.83 of 5 stars 3.83  ·  rating details  ·  4,373 ratings  ·  191 reviews
Through diary entries, 11-year-old Abby Stewart, whose family lives near Valley Forge, records what it must have been like to live among the soldiers. This realistic look at the Revolutionary War is rounded out with lengthy historical notes, as well as an epilogue that reveals the fates of these fictional characters.
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Published January 1st 2006 by Live Oak Media (NY) (first published September 1st 1996)
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Jess
Feb 01, 2009 Jess rated it 3 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Dear America Fans
Recommended to Jess by: Revolutionary War Booktalk
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Madeline
This book was amazing! It was very touching and had lots of joyful moments.
Heather
As a kid I loved reading the Dear America diaries although I only read a few of them back then. I have recently found myself interested in them again (of course after I gave away all of mine and when the majority of them are still out of print!). However, as of 2010, Scholastic has begun to reprint many of the books as well as release new ones.

The Winter of Red Snow was my second read in this series (however it is the first I am reviewing at this time). I have to admit that I never spent much ti
...more
Rebecca
Abigail Jane Stewart, called Abby by her family and friends, is eleven years old and living in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania when the American army arrives there in December 1777. Abby is mostly worried about her mother and her new baby brother, because five of her brothers died in infancy and she is afraid for this new baby. She thinks war is an adventure and doesn’t understand how serious it is.

However, when Abby, her mother, and her two sisters get a job doing laundry for General Washington, Abb
...more
Brennan H
I have recently been reading The Winter of Red Snow, by Robert Waguespack. Abigail Stewart is living in Valley Forge, Pennaylvania with her two sisters, baby brother, and parents. They clean general Washington"s shirts and have acutally met him and his wife! Unfortunately, it is a time of great tragedy and loss. Her family is doing all they can for the soldiers, but it's hard to help sombody who steals you sheep, hens, pigs, and even fences. They sneak into peoples barns to sleep and don't both ...more
Nielson
A part of the Dear America series, this particular book focuses on the Revolutionary War as seen through the eyes of eleven year old Abigail. The entries describe the grim realities of the war that freed us from England's rule. These books are a wonderful way for students to learn more about these specific times in American history. The writers' stories make past events come alive for the readers and help instill a greater appreciation for our predecessors. Also included at the back of each book ...more
Shannon
Hands down the coolest thing about this book is the built in ribbon bookmark. Red snow refers to blood. Anything else about this book I completely forgot.
Anabella
i love this whole series

Amanda
I admit that I bought this book in large part because I wanted to see whether the Dear America books were ever actually good, or whether I imagined that they were good, or whether they only seemed good because I was so young when I read them.

I generally enjoyed this book. I like the diary format and snapshot of every day life. Also, I enjoyed the imagined interactions between the Stewart family and the Washingtons.

Things I didn't like as much: the lack of depth that comes with a child's diary a
...more
Geraldine Orlik
This story is about eleven year old,Abigail Jane Stewart. She and her two sisters, baby brother and parents live in Valley Forge, PA. circa 1777. She keeps a journal of the events that unfold when General George Washington tries to form his Continental Army near her home. Her family and the surrounding neighbor's lives become consumed in assisting the general and the army through a tough winter. Though the book is fictional it revolves around real people and real events. This book surprised me. ...more
Mundie Moms & Mundie Kids
Kristina Gregory captures the innocence of childhood and growing up during Amercia's Revolutionary War. America just gained it's independence from England, but the fighting hasn't ceased. The years are 1776-177, and winter is a brutal one. Abigail's story is one that will capture the heart and attention of young readers and adults alike who want to gain an understanding of what it was like to live in Valley Forge, PA during 1777.

Abigail and her family are just trying to get by when General Geor
...more
Jadalynn
This book is historical fiction and it would be good for intermediate readers. This book is the diary of a young girl growing up in the middle of the revolutionary war. It’s a somewhat dry book, there’s not much to it. I remember reading it for the first time, probably in 6th grade, not really enjoying it, and reading through it again I still didn’t really enjoy it. It’s not a bad book, but not all that fascinating. Kids could learn a lot from it, but only if they read it. I like to encourage ch ...more
Purlewe
My 3rd Dear America book.

I will say I liked this better than the SC Civil War story. Perhaps it was b'c it is set in Valley Forge, which is very close to where I live. It is someplace I have visited frequently. Perhaps it is b'c I have a large interest in colonial life. Either way I felt that this was a great story for children who are interested in learning about how people lived before the Revolutionary War. How did the soldiers survive that terrible winter of 77/78? How did they become a mil
...more
Shelby
This story is about eleven year old,Abigail Jane Stewart. She and her two sisters, newborn baby brother and parents live in Valley Forge, PA in 1777.Abigail begins her diary during the Revolutionary War, as hundreds of poor, freezing, and starving soldiers spend the winter in Abigail’s hometown. During this time, Abigail and her family work for George and Martha Washington.She witnessed hangings and drumming outs even whippings! Most of the families suffered loss.Abby and her sisters learn first ...more
Ana Mardoll
The Winter of Red Snow (Valley Forge) / 0-590-22653-3

Like almost all of the Dear America books, there's a wealth of fascinating history here, from the big picture look at the American army during the winter of 1777 to the day-to-day life details, like cleaning a chimney by lowering a flapping rooster down it! As is typical for the Dear America books, the author presents a balanced view of a complicated situation: although the narrator and her family are avidly patriotic, they do not fail to noti
...more
Katieb (MundieMoms)
Kristina Gregory captures the innocence of childhood and growing up during Amercia's Revolutionary War. America just gained it's independence from England, but the fighting hasn't ceased. The years are 1776-177, and winter is a brutal one. Abigail's story is one that will capture the heart and attention of young readers and adults alike who want to gain an understanding of what it was like to live in Valley Forge, PA during 1777.

Abigail and her family are just trying to get by when General Geor
...more
Brittany Watts
This book is a historical fiction book intended for middle school aged children. This book is about a girl named Abby who's mother has just had a baby. Abby is worried about this baby because the other 5 her mother had before had died when they where at that age. Abby and her family work cleaning laundry for the army, sewing and visiting the injured men. Abby's and her family hear all kinds of stories about the war while visiting the injured men and really see how horrible the war is. I gave thi ...more
Jennifer Wardrip
Reviewed by Monica Sheffo for TeensReadToo.com

Abigail is a young girl living in Valley Forge during the Revolutionary War. She and her family are enduring great struggles during this hard time, between the birth of a new baby to the battles seemingly taking place right outside their doorstep.

She must get used to the idea that sides must be chosen, loyalties will be tested, and the true reason of what it means to be an American will be realized.

Smart and honest, this story is the perfect read for
...more
April
Great book while we're studying the Revolutionary War. It has a great idea, through Abigail's thoughts of what it was like to live without television, and help make soap and dinner. It also gave an good idea of what the unfortunate sights of war would have been. She witnessed hangings and drumming outs. Some of the families suffered loss. While it had some seriously sad issues to deal with, so you may want to think twice about some younger kids...but my 7 and 12 year old were able to grasp the g ...more
Lauren
Enjoyable read. Like So Far From Home, the epilogue does ignore a lot of important characters, which I think is a small problem. Unlike So Far From Home, the characters it doesn't ignore, it goes into a decent amount of detail, which I consider to be a significant improvement. The characters were relatable and enjoyable, generally speaking, although it does have a tendency to become a bit tedious midway through when there isn't all that much going on. The best parts by far are the ones where Geo ...more
Grant&Mimi
The Scholastic Dear America series is a wonderful way to lightly introduce people of all ages to historical and quasi-historical diarists and this style of writing both for their reading enjoyment and to encourage them to start or re-discover personal journaling.

AND these editions make excellent uniform bases for an ALTERED BOOK JOURNAL SET when you are finished reading them, about $1 at the local co-op, tons of titles, 19x14cm, about 175 pages each, smooth hard covers in lots of different colo
...more
Callie Stillion
Abigail and her family are working hard together, to be strong during the war. While Abby tries to keep up in her diary, she knows out there the soldiers need her help. She knows that making things will help them, and she goes to see Mrs. Washington once a week. With Elisabeth by her side, Abigail can be strong, and be a helper in the Revolutionary War. Wanting to help, Elisabeth donates a coat. It doesn`t end up on a human, but on a dog, the dog, Arzo. Abby donates her cloak, and uses blankets ...more
Janel
I picked this book as an alternative to My Brother Sam is Dead for struggling readers in our school since it also dealt with the unsavory aspects of war. The story format is simple and it is easy to follow. I thought the depictions of soldier life in Valley Forge were perfect -- just graphic enough to fully disturb elementary students, but not too graphic as to traumatize. The depictions of Martha and George Washington were well done, as well. The rest of the journal that dealt with Abigail's fa ...more
Angela Hutchinson
I enjoyed reading this book. It is written as a journal by a young girl named Abigail Jane Stewart. In this book, she tells about her experience during the Revolutionary War and the soldiers camping at Valley Forge during the winter of 1777-1778. She writes about her family life, the soldiers struggles, and George Washington's headquarters. I like the fact that the Dear America series has historical facts in the back along with historical images. This would be a great book for students that enjo ...more
Megan Trinh
The winter of the red snow was a book I really enjoyed. One of my favorite characters was Lucy, a bold yet brave girl. This book was also a great resource for how life in the winter of 1777-1778 was like. Some characters in this novel also remind me of real people in my life.If you are interested in reading this novel and liked it, you should also read the sequel to see what happens next. Even though I haven't read the sequel yet, I look forward to reading it.In conclusion,I would recomend read ...more
Littlesproutedseeds
We just finished reading this book as part of our American Revolution unit in history. We loved it and cannot wait to get the second book, Cannons at Dawn. The book talked about how it was like to live in those times near/with the Continental Army. It is told in dairy form and makes the book really interesting. This book would make a good addition to any homeschooling unit on the American Revolution. It also falls in line with the Charlotte Mason's method of teaching with living books.
Beverly
The things you will learn! This book will teach you how your great-greats lived. Who would have thought placing eggs in a box of wood ashes would keep them fresh?! You just turn them once a day, as a hen would, pointed side down one day and up the next.

Clean your chimney....just drop a rooster from the top and his fluttering wings will knock soot off the bricks.

The biggest surprise is what they used to brighten white clothes!

Enjoy! !
Hannah
Mar 28, 2014 Hannah rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Children, Young Adults, People Interested in History
As a whole, I love the Dear America series and I would recommend them to anyone interested in history in general. The Dear America series defines my childhood, and The Winter of the Red Snow started my infatuation. I couldn't put it down, it made me cry, and it made me experience what "Ms. Stewart"or people in general were going through during the American Revolution.
Ren
All characters are boring goody two-shoes. And I thought it was meant to be all AMERICA!! and PATRIOTISM!! but all that came across was that Washington and his wife were pricks. Oh wow they deigned to be kind to the hired help after they more or less commandeered a whole valley and supplies, what a bunch of heroes. I liked the author's other books way better.
Linda Callahan
LOL. Okay I am 58 but hooked on this series. The books are easy to read and since they are children's books make a one night read. Great way to see the world through the time period. I personally love American history so it makes a fun evening to just "visit" the time period.
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2015 Reading Chal...: Winter of Red Snow 1 11 Mar 02, 2015 03:55PM  
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10886
Kristiana Gregory grew up in Manhattan Beach, California, two blocks from the ocean. She's always loved to make up stories [ask her family!], telling her younger siblings whoppers that would leave them wide-eyed and shivering. Her first rejection letter at age ten was for a poem she wrote in class when she was supposed to be doing a math assignment. She's had a myriad of odd jobs: telephone operat ...more
More about Kristiana Gregory...

Other Books in the Series

Dear America (1 - 10 of 43 books)
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  • When Will This Cruel War Be Over?: The Civil War Diary of Emma Simpson, Gordonsville, Virginia, 1864 (Dear America)
  • A Picture of Freedom: The Diary of Clotee, a Slave Girl, Belmont Plantation, Virginia 1859 (Dear America)
  • Across The Wide And Lonesome Prairie: The Oregon Trail Diary Of Hattie Campbell
  • So Far From Home: the Diary of Mary Driscoll, an Irish Mill Girl, Lowell, Massachusetts, 1847 (Dear America)
  • I Thought My Soul Would Rise and Fly: The Diary of Patsy, a Freed Girl, Mars Bluff, South Carolina, 1865 (Dear America)
  • West to a Land of Plenty: The Diary of Teresa Angelino Viscardi
  • Dreams In The Golden Country: the Diary of Zipporah Feldman, a Jewish Immigrant Girl, New York City, 1903 (Dear America Series)
  • Standing in the Light: The Captive Diary of Catharine Carey Logan, Delaware Valley, Pennsylvania, 1763 (Dear America)
  • Voyage on the Great Titanic: The Diary of Margaret Ann Brady, R.M.S. Titanic, 1912
Cleopatra VII: Daughter of the Nile - 57 B.C. (Royal Diaries #2) Across The Wide And Lonesome Prairie: The Oregon Trail Diary Of Hattie Campbell Eleanor: Crown Jewel of Aquitaine, France, 1136 The Great Railroad Race: the Diary of Libby West (Dear America) Catherine: The Great Journey, Russia, 1743

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