The Drawing of the Three (The Dark Tower, #2)
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The Drawing of the Three (The Dark Tower #2)

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4.19 of 5 stars 4.19  ·  rating details  ·  94,481 ratings  ·  2,661 reviews
In 1978, Stephen King introduced the world to the last gunslinger, Roland of Gilead. Nothing has been the same since. More than twenty years later, the quest for the Dark Tower continues to take readers on a wildly epic ride. Through parallel worlds and across time, Roland must brave desolate wastelands and endless deserts, drifting into the unimaginable and the familiar....more
Paperback, 463 pages
Published August 5th 2003 by Signet (first published 1987)
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The Stand by Stephen KingIt by Stephen KingThe Shining by Stephen KingMisery by Stephen King'Salem's Lot by Stephen King
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Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 3,000)
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Stephen
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Dan Schwent
Roland Deschain, fresh from the events of the Gunslinger, lies exhausted and poisoned on the shores of the ocean. In his delirium, he finds three doorways leading to our world and his new ka-tet. Will Roland survive long enough to bring his new ka-tet?

This is when the Dark Tower really started coming together. The first thing that happens really shocked the crap out of me. Damn lobstrosities! I had no idea what Roland was going to go through when I first opened this one.

The new characters are in...more
Kemper
Mid-World General Emergency Room - 9:19 PM

“Step in here, please. What’s your name?”

“Roland Deschain.”

“And do you have any allergies, Mr. Deschain?”

“No.”

“And when…..wait a second. Roland Deschain? The last gunslinger? The guy who is on a quest to find the Dark Tower?”

“That’s me.”

“Wow. This is an honor. I mean, I see a lot of scum and mutants come through here. Especially since the world has moved on and all that, but to get Roland the gunslinger in here as a patient? That’s just crazy! I can’t wa...more
Seak (Bryce L.)
"...There's going to be shooting."
"There is?"
"Yes." The gunslinger looked serenely at Eddie. "Quite a lot of it, I think."

And so begins the coolest, most intense gun fight I've ever read.

Ever since I put down The Stand 300 pages in, I thought I'd never read another Stephen King novel. You could say I was even proud of the fact. Everyone seems to love King and I'm the only one who doesn't. I'm unique... I also don't like Katy Perry.

Well, then he had to go and write The Dark Tower series. The pre...more
Amanda
May 28, 2013 Amanda rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to Amanda by: Everyone at Shelf Inflicted!
Shelves: blog
"What the hell was that?!!?" basically sums up my response to The Drawing of the Three. And I mean that in the best possible way.

As I opined in my review of The Gunslinger, I have avoided The Dark Tower for so long because it's a series and usually series books serve up a formulaic reheating of what happened in previous books. I usually enjoy the first book, like the second book, and begin to get that deja vu feeling that I've read all of this before somewhere around book three. Not so with thi...more
Lou
The epic journey, the pilgrim continues his journey In searcheth of The Dark Tower. The Gunslinger Roland enters new dimensions, new doors three to be exact in search of The Three individuals which he his fated to be with.
The story is mix of many settings starting in The western seafront with The Gunslinger and dangerous Lobstrosities and then to 1980's a heroin addict and mobsters in P.O.V mode for The first of The Three 'The Prisoner'.
Roland The Gunslinger also pays a visit to the other 2 cand
...more
David Sven
THE GUNSLINGER
Roland Deschain – Of the line of Eld – all the way back to Arthur Eld
“Merlin and Arthur and the knights of the Round Table,” Jake said dreamily.
The gunslinger felt a nasty jolt go through him. “Yes,” he said. “Arthur Eld, you say true, I say thank ya.


Roland continues his quest for The Dark Tower where he intends to do
...whatever it is I’m supposed to do there, accomplished whatever fundamental act of restoration or redemption for which I was meant,...

THE TOWER
We learned from the...more
Terry
The Drawing of the Three is the second book of Stephen King’s magnum opus The Dark Tower. So far it hasn’t been bad, but I have to admit that I’m not fully a believer yet. It’s a good story, taking up where we left off in The Gunslinger with Roland on the beach after having confronted the Man in Black and pondering his next move. After being attacked and wounded by a lobstrosity (wtf?! couldn’t King come up with something better? I mean it kind of makes Roland look like a dweeb that he was overc...more
Tfitoby
Gunslinger was a strange little book, a surreal tale of some kind of dystopia with a protagonist straight out of a classic noir. It was interesting and entertaining and didn't really inspire me to finish a series that might just keep getting longer whilst I work my way through it. Turns out Stephen King got the Dark Tower bug back and after finishing the series he wrote another instalment. Ordinarily I'd be against such behaviour but after ploughing through this second episode in record time who...more
Robin Branson
Moving on in the Dark Tower series, we come to the quintessential suspense fantasy of Stephen King's legacy. You've made it- trudged through three hundred drawn-out, dense pages of Roland's quest and its beginnings. You may not be expecting what you're about to get from this read. Take my advice: wait until you don't have work in the morning, find a quiet small room with no distractions, dive in, and prepare to be amazed. My only problem with The Drawing of the Three was its length; it might hav...more
Jonathan Cullen
Jan 31, 2011 Jonathan Cullen rated it 5 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: those with shellfish allergies
The Drawing of the Three deserves my five stars not simply for being a kick-ass book but for a more important reason: it rescued and defined the entire Dark Tower series.

If you read, or read between the lines of most reviews of The Gunslinger, you'll find that many people enjoyed it but were not blown away. The style is inaccessible, there are no answers to questions and you don't really understand what's going on. Then read what people say when they hit Drawing. They are catapulted into the ser...more
Kathryn
I am going to give The Drawing of the Three 4.5 stars.

Whew! What a wild ride! The beginning for me, when Roland meets Eddie, was a little boring. But, wow, does it surely pick up! The whole idea Roland could inhabit someone else by opening a door is a really interesting concept. There were some questions I had as I read TDOTT: What determined who Roland would open a door to? Does the person have to be good, bad, a saint, or evil? In the end, those questions were kind of answered, but not withou...more
Richard
8.5/10

A really good second novel in the series where things seem to hit their stride and the promise of the first book becomes even more evident here. For me to only rate it 4 stars was really hard as it’s as high as a 4 star book will ever be from me. There were just a couple of things that prevented me from giving it that highest of high ratings.

The story is split into three after a crazy opening where straight off the bat things go downhill for Roland and his quest is put in jeopardy. The lo...more
Sesana
I really liked The Gunslinger, but this, the second Dark Tower book, turns it all up a notch or twenty. Sometimes surreal, vividly imagined, tightly plotted, with memorable characters and some really great lines and more great lines than I could possibly quote. Considering that I've already started listening to The Waste Lands, you could safely say that this is the point where I got hooked on The Dark Tower. But I will say that I'd had enough of Detta Walker fairly quickly, though I wouldn't dou...more
Victor
Time for the real review!

This book blew me away! There was no slow parts and tons of unexpected things going on! The part where Roland was in the third door and Detta and Eddie were together was amazing! the shoot out in Eddies door was awesome and the whole thing was just awesome! I can't wait to read The Waste Lands!

1.the Drawing of the Three
2. The Gunslinger

Currently my favorite book in the Dark Tower series!
Becky
This is a re-read for me a couple times over. This time I listened to the audio version read by Frank Muller, which I enjoyed immensely. I didn't care for Muller's reading much in The Gunslinger, but this time around, he has really grown on me. Perhaps it was due to the fact that there are so many more characters that actually stick around for a while, it took a lot of the focus off of the Gunslinger-voice that I felt was a bit much in The Gunslinger, and let a more natural feel come through.

On...more
Rob
Executive Summary: In the second of the Dark Tower epic, Mr. King ratchets up the action, the conflict and most certainly the weird.

If anyone reads The Gunslinger and wonders “why do people like this series?” I advise them to continue on to this one, and find out. If after this book they still don’t get it, then this series is not for them.

Audiobook: I listened to the revised edition of The Gunslinger, which is read by George Guidall, who took over starting with Wolves of the Calla. With this b...more
Marc
Well, I liked the first one clearly better. He has some nice ideas and especially daring one right at the start. But there also some ideas that just don't add up for me. The new characters aren't bad, but act strangely sometimes and sometimes get annoying. I have to say that I am not a fan of the concept to pull charcters from the real world into his fantasy realm. But we will see how it pans out.
Another main complain is the length. Yes, you can read quickly through it, but I ahve to say that I...more
Edward Lorn
THE DRAWING OF THE THREE Review The second book in Roland's quest for the Dark Tower is my second favorite in the series. That being said, it's far from perfect. I'm going to start this review of my third read-through of this novel with the things that either broke my suspension of disbelief or made me cringe.

First and foremost: Like many readers, I cannot stand Insta-Love. Eddie and Odetta's immediate coupling always throws me, no matter how many times I read this book. This relationship strike...more
Chris
The Drawing of the Three is the novel where the Dark Tower story goes from being a cool gunslinger action adventure of the weird west to being a true epic. We still have elements of that otherworldly western flavor, but we get a huge mixture of reality when Roland, the gunslinger anti-hero of the first book, opens a door into “our” world.

The three doors Roland must open each connect to our world, but at different “whens”, different eras. From each of these entry points, there are things that Rol...more
F.R.
Fantasy and science fiction authors of course have a limited canvass on which to paint on. If the author establishes that this is a far away world, or some distant future time, then only the imagination will limit the wonder of the places and worlds visited. There are no problems of geography or historical inaccuracy or deviation from real life. This is a new ‘real’ world and the author can do anything he or she likes with it. That’s why I’m always slightly disappointed when fantasy and science...more
Mike (the Paladin)
The second book in the Dark Tower series we continue to follow Roland in his "quest". Picking up where The Gunslinger (The Dark Tower, #1) by Stephen King left off we find Roland Deschain moving down a beach on "some world". Along this beach he will come to 3 Doors which will open into New York City at different Times and places and from there Roland will...Draw his 3.

If you've read my review of the first book you know that I'm a bit torn as I can't say I "enjoy" these books. The worlds are too full of a kind of "crudity" (a word I've settled o...more
Janie Johnson
What a journey I have started with this series. I can't believe how much there is to absorb having read this before. So many things I did not remember but have been refreshed. I find myself craving more as I read each book. I feel that this one certainly tops the first. Such well painted characters and scenery. The concept of this novel is amazing. I love the idea of the doors. Anyone would have a hard time putting these down.

Roland has such a rich personality, he's hero but at the same time, a...more
Wendell Adams
I'm really torn on this book. While it was enjoyable enough for me to want to continue with the series, I can't say I actually enjoyed the book very much. Roland I love; his history and his world's story I can't wait to read. Eddie and Odetta not so much; honestly, I plodded through their stories in this book, just waiting until King actually got back to Roland. Hopefully, there will be less of the new gunslingers and more of the interesting one in the rest of the books.
Michael Benavidez
Where the first book was set more in the western type pace, this one quickly goes into a King fantasy and even better, into King's normally large cast. Eddie Dean, Roland, Detta, Odetta, and Mort (and some who've I've probably forgotten.
King is clearly more comfortable in these pages than in the last, at least to me that's how it felt. Where in the first book Roland seemed a mystery to even King himself, and didn't know what to do, here King doesn't try to write as Roland. Instead he gives us,...more
Allison (The Allure of Books)
Reading this volume, it struck me that Stephen King really didn't know fully the depth and strain of the story he was writing as he wrote The Gunslinger. Not to say I don't still love that part of the story too, because I do. It is just that with The Drawing of the Three, the story takes a completely different direction and has a totally different vibe.

There was one specific passage I really liked:
No, sugar was not cocaine, but Roland could not understand why anyone would want cocaine or any oth...more
Dawn
When I reviewed The Gunslinger (book one in this series), I gave it four stars, but stated that it was barely getting four stars. While I liked it, it was nothing spectacular. I'm also giving this one four stars, but this time it's actually closer to the five side.

I really loved this book, and am really glad I decided to continue in the series. I can't wait to pick up the next book, and I'm guessing that this series just might become one of my all time favorites.

You get to know Roland a lot bett...more
Jamie
From the very moment I opened this book, I knew I was going to like it. Immediately, I was drawn into the world that King was trying to paint. I wasn’t sure if I was going to like the rest of the Gunslinger Series based upon the first book (let’s be honest, the book is rather boring and, at first, confusing), but I am so glad I kept reading.

The Drawing of Three continues with Roland and his adventure towards the Dark Tower. As predicted by the man in black in the last book, Roland must collect t...more
Christy
I bought the first four books of the series together (because it was cheaper that way) but I'm not sure that I want to keep reading. On the one hand, I hear that the series improves after its beginning and this book was definitely better than The Gunslinger, which I found to be annoying in its attempts at being grand and mythic; however, it took me what felt like forever to get through this book because I just kept putting it down and wandering away to do something else. It comes in short, often...more
Irena
The Drawing of the Three starts a few hours after the ending of The Gunslinger. Roland is still on his quest for the dark Tower.

In the course of this story, Roland gets two companions. He visits their world on three different occasions and times using three doors he finds standing on their own miles from each other. That would be the sum of it, but this being a Stephen King's work, you know you can expect a lot more.
While I hated Detta with a passion and found Eddie's naiveté annoying at times,...more
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Stephen Edwin King was born the second son of Donald and Nellie Ruth Pillsbury King. After his father left them when Stephen was two, he and his older brother, David, were raised by his mother. Parts of his childhood were spent in Fort Wayne, Indiana, where his father's family was at the time, and in Stratford, Connecticut. When Stephen was eleven, his mother brought her children back to Durham, M...more
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“Control the things you can control, maggot. Let everything else take a flying fuck at you and if you must go down, go down with your guns blazing.” 195 likes
“What we like to think of ourselves and what we really are rarely have much in common....” 109 likes
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