Last Orders
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating

Last Orders

3.66 of 5 stars 3.66  ·  rating details  ·  6,038 ratings  ·  212 reviews
Winner of the 1996 Booker Prize, and now a major new film starring Bob Hoskins, Helen Mirren and Michael Caine. Four men once close to Jack Dodds, a London butcher, meet to carry out his peculiar last wish: to have his ashes scattered into the sea. For reasons best known to herself, Jack's widow, Amy, declines to join them. On the surface the tale of a simple if increasing...more
Paperback, 352 pages
Published December 7th 2001 by Picador (first published January 1st 1996)
more details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.
Life of Pi by Yann MartelThe God of Small Things by Arundhati RoyThe Remains of the Day by Kazuo IshiguroMidnight's Children by Salman RushdieThe Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood
Booker Prize Winners
31st out of 48 books — 1,238 voters
The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. TolkienForrest Gump by Winston GroomThe Hunger Games by Suzanne CollinsThe Godfather by Mario PuzoHarry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by J.K. Rowling
Books made into really good movies
139th out of 389 books — 135 voters


More lists with this book...

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 3,000)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  rating details
Jane Odgers
Characters

Jack Arthur Dodds (deceased) - "Dodds and Son Family Butcher, since 1903".
Vince Dodds (Vincent Ian Pritchett) - "son" of Jack and Amy. "Dodds' Autos"
Ray "Lucky" Johnson - "...if you want to put a bet on, he's your man".
Lenny Tate, Grocer - "Gunner Tate, middleweight. Always pissed. Always late".
Vic Tucker, Funeral Director - "...at your disposal".
Amy Dodds - Jack's wife, mother of June (mentally disabled). "...it was hop picking that started it....It's all pickings."
Mandy Black -...more
Tony
This begins: “It ain’t like your regular sort of day.” Not exactly “Call me Ishmael” but you have to start somewhere. A little workshoppy, but there’s some promise there. Perhaps it could turn into a one-day, colloquial journey through themes and characters.

But then again, maybe not. In a few brisk chapters we have encountered (the word met suggests more purchase than we are given) Ray, Jack, Sue, Sally, Vince, Vic, Lenny, Amy, Bernie, Brenda, Joan, Mandy, Carol and Charlie. Was there any need t...more
Kerfe
"I'd like to be all kinds of people....but I can't because I'm me....I don't want to be like me, I want to be like them but I can't I can't I can't."

It took me about one third of the book to straighten out the characters in my mind. I was thinking I should go back and re-read the beginning, but now I think it was better that all the stories were jumbled and then clarified. Or somewhat clarified. The characters themselves have not sorted out their relationships or their pasts either.

Each short ch...more
Frederick
I won't describe the plot here. You can find that in the Goodreads description. I will make some observations, among them my idea that, whether by design or not, LAST ORDERS is Joycean. It is also accessible. The reason I think it may not be a conscious imitation of Joyce is that I suspect Joyce, fundamental innovator though he was, wrote in a tradition. Somebody once said you could go to any bar in Dublin and hear the sort of conversations you'd read in ULYSSES. Graham Swift's Englishmen (and w...more
carri farrand
let's stop in for a pint. jack would've wanted it. jack would've expected it.



brilliant.
Ellen
What a beautiful, beautiful book. Graham Swift has got to be one of the greatest writers of our generation. This is not a large book, but one should take his time reading to savor his language, his great skill in crafting amazingly simple stories of everyday people. Swift brings his characters--in this book, butchers, junk dealers, used car salesmen, funeral directors, housewives--great dignity.

Four friends set out to scatter the ashes of a mutual friend, at his request. Not an original plot de...more
Tudor Ciocarlie
Unfortunately I couldn't connect to this book..the language, the words, the English working class just could not engage with my 2011's mind in any way.
Karen
As with Waterland, Swift has, again, bypassed my brain and gone straight for my heart; that is, I felt this rather than understood it. And, as with Waterland, I'd feel dishonest giving it four stars but don't doubt that it'll get there on a second reading. He has a real talent for making the mundane beautiful.

I have been close to encountering this story twice in my life. I distinctly remember nearly buying it back in the 90's based purely on the (pint glass) cover, but this was probably more due...more
Jogle
An apparent homage to Faulkner's 'As I lay Dying', a long drawn out funeral entourage is used to outline in falshback the entangled lives of a group of Londoners and their relationship with the dead man, Jack Dodds, whose ashes they are carrying to be scattered on the sea at Margate.
The writng style is plain, reflecting the austerity of the post war setting of a lot of the reminiscence. The story is engaging and was made into a star studded film and yet someting about the book does not quite wo...more
lisa
This book made me cry. Seriously. So you know that it is going straight to the list of best reads of the year. For real. Which is surprising because the narrative structure of the book is one that I typically don't like. The story is told from a multiperspectival point of view, with chapters being named for the person who is narrating that chapter, or, from where the events in the chapter are taking place, in which case Ray is the narrator. This isn't my favorite narrative style, but for this st...more
Kristin
I feel the need with this review to point out that my rating has to do with how much I enjoyed the book/how much I got out of it rather than how I would rate the book as a piece of literature, capable of standing the test of time, etc. This is a technically accomplished novel, interesting characterization, but it just didn't do it for me. It was too straightforward with the narrative to interest me on that score and the characters created, while feeling quite true to life with all their faults a...more
Joanna
I listened to the amazing audiobook version of this (on cassette, no less). Multiple narrators helped to make the frequently-shifting perspectives easier to keep track of while listening. I don't know that one narrator could have really managed it. The book centers on a group of men (and a couple of wives given occasional voice) as they travel together to release the ashes of one of their own. The perspective shifts between the characters and the time frame shifts between the present-day journey...more
Kathy
Four grown men and the follies of their lives and relationships, and the love that ties and keeps them all together. They carry the ashes around from the bar to the meadows to the cathedral and to the end of a dirty old pier and each tells his own story along the way.

It's an easy read, but read the first 50 pages straight through or else you'll get confused about who's who like I did and have to re-read them. The relationships are complex and interwoven and riddled with deceit and disappointment...more
Sunaina Khurana
Meh. Don't get me wrong. The writer is really good. He has to be to be able to get into the skin of so many characters and portray them so distinctively. The plot is interesting too ... or could've been, if it were less convoluted with so many breaks for each character's narrative. But that's just it. It took me halfway down the book to get a grip on the story and the way it ended left me wondering what the point was. And throughout I couldn't wait to get over with it to go on to the next book....more
Darryl
This is a deceptively simple novel. On its face it tells the tale of four Englishmen honoring the last wishes of a deceased buddy. The deceptive part is that through an adroit use of dialect and an insightful presentation of the lives of these men, and their related women, we get a rich psycho-sociological snapshot of the English zeitgeist of the late 20th C. This book apparently caused a stir in some quarters with charges about the author's sources, and some charges of being hackneyed. Don't kn...more
Debra
This is one of those books where I could not decide if I like it until after I had finished reading it and thought about the book. It took me some time to get used to the language and Swift's style of writing. The book is told in various characters point of view. This actually was what I enjoyed most about the book. There are a lot of characters and people to keep track of. It took me some time to figure out who everyone was in relation to other characters in the book. In the end, I liked it but...more
Perry Whitford
A group of friends get together shortly after a funeral in order to act out the final wish of the recently deceased, one Jack Dodds, Master Butcher, which was to scatter his ashes off of Margate Pier. As you would expect, the mourners have a tangled past together, full of shared and separate secrets, life-long grievances and regrets.
Begun during WWII and cemented over the decades, much of the time spent down 'the Coaches' in Bermondsey over a few pints, the friends' lives have impacted on each...more
Calzean
Lovely story about four men who take their mate Jack's ashes to be scattered. Each chapter is written by one of the characters, including Jack and towards the end by Jacks' wife Amy. Jack and Amy have had only the one daughter who was born so disabled she has lived her life in a home and has never spoken.

All of the characters are very likeable - maybe not Vince the adopted son who is a car salesman - and they have lived simple, honest lives but as humans they all have their flaws. The reflexions...more
Notcathy J
Cathy wrote: "won the Booker Prize the week after I stole it out of a box full of comps." (She was working at the UT co-op bookstore, I think. Or else Borders.)
Bookguide
This book is a walk down memory lane for me, a personal road trip to the past. It was wonderful! Margate pier, the jetty and I have a personal relationship. I remember walking up the (metal and wood) jetty as a child, feeling slightly scared looking at the waves through the boards, feeling slightly adventurous. I have walked up that stone jetty with the smells of tar and rope, seaweed and saltwater, watching the boats bobbing in the harbour, the lifeboat and the lighthouse at the end. When the j...more
Yofish
Jan 09, 2009 Yofish rated it 5 of 5 stars
Recommended to Yofish by: From a movie
Shelves: read-fiction
Framed around four guys going to spread the ashes of a dead friend. (It was his 'last orders' to them to do this.) Three are drinking buddies/business friends/army buddies with the dead guy. (The fourth is sort of an adopted son.) Each chapter (short) is told from the perspective of one of them, or sometimes someone's wife. Some are about the actual trip--where they are, why they're there--and some are reminisces about the past. We learn about the conflicts between the adopted son and the dead g...more
Andrew
In a way, the plot of Last Orders is very simple: a group of friends drive to the coast to scatter the ashes of their friend Jack. Yes, that's it. Along the way they have arguments and fights and endless pints of beer, but none of that is really the point. The real action of this book takes place in the past, appropriately enough for a novel about scattering ashes. These are old men remembering not only Jack but also their own former selves.

There are lots of lies and secrets and betrayals, but m...more
Lisa
Last Orders is a lovely book. It won the Booker Prize in 1996, and was made into a terrific film with Michael Caine as Jack.

It's a deceptively simple story. Four blokes take a day trip to Margate Pier to spread the ashes of their mate, Jack, to the sea. Multiple narrators carry the story through flashbacks to the past and commentary on present events, gradually revealing a complex network of relationships, misunderstandings and betrayals, a fragile web held together by grudging affection and res...more
Kate Z
I lived in London when this book won the Booker Prize. I saw it EVERYWHERE. It's one of those books on my personal list of "I should have read this." Generally speaking I'm a fan of Booker books so that's more incentive for me.

*****

This was a good book but also a difficult book to read. All along I felt like I was reading a movie script. I could almost hear the characters speaking and see the working class suburb that they were from. From that standpoint, the book is excellent. These were real,...more
Ian Mapp
Strangley difficult to read book which is excellent - especially on watching the perhaps superior film, which was wonderfully made.

There are a large number of characters and the story is told in short bursts of chapters from every character's perspective jumping between time frames.

The challenge for the reader is keeping on top of the relationships, points of view and descriptions of the same events from other peolples perspectives.

Again, it is a book that would have really benefited from keepin...more
Seth Rogovoy
This is my first Graham Swift novel. Where the hell has he been? I'm a great fan of contemporary English novelists, and somehow Graham Swift has evaded my radar -- until now. "Last Orders" is a brilliant book. While I may not have gotten the sort of pure enjoyment and pleasure from it that I sometimes get from Zadie Smith or Martin Amis, I did get great pleasure from Swift's command of the English language. In "Last Orders" he's nothing less than a late-20th century James Joyce. The story itself...more
Heather Pearson
Jack Dodds passed away shortly after closing his family butcher shop. Today is the day appointed for dispersing his ashes, and his son and friends have gathered. If they had awaken this morning thinking that it would be an easy task, just open the jar and pour, then they were mistaken.

While his son Vince, and his friends Ray, Lenny and Vic are on their way to the seaside, his wife Amy is visiting their daughter June to break the news to her.

This day, meant to honour Jack, turns out to be one of...more
Tony
LAST ORDERS. (1996). Graham Swift. ****.
Although I found it hard in the beginning keeping all of the characters straight, it soon became a non-issue as I moved through the story. The story is pretty simple. A man has died and been cremated. In a letter he wrote before he passed he put down his request: His ashes were to be cast off the pier in Margate. It fell to the lot of his drinking buddies to carry this request out. We meet them all as they gather for a drink in their usual haunt, and then...more
Nancy Oakes
Well, I must say that at first I thought this was going to be an "iffy" book, but I stayed with it and now I'm really happy I did. What a fine novel! What great writing! Now I must find more by this author.

Let me also say that this book is not for everyone. It is not something you can pick up and expect to finish as quickly as, say, a James Patterson novel. It takes time to read and digest, so if you're looking for something quick and easy, forget it. This book has substance, and you will really...more
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 99 100 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »
  • Saville
  • Holiday
  • Something to Answer For
  • The Conservationist
  • The Elected Member
  • Offshore
  • The Old Devils
  • How Late It Was, How Late
  • Rites of Passage (To the Ends of the Earth, #1)
  • G.
  • Staying On
  • Moon Tiger
  • In a Free State
  • Sacred Hunger
  • Heat and Dust
  • Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha
  • The Siege of Krishnapur (Empire Trilogy, #2)
  • The Ghost Road (Regeneration, #3)
3449
Graham Colin Swift FRSL (born May 4, 1949) is a British author. He was born in London, England and educated at Dulwich College, London, Queens' College, Cambridge, and later the University of York. He was a friend of Ted Hughes.

Some of his works have been made into films, including Last Orders, which starred Michael Caine and Bob Hoskins and Waterland which starred Jeremy Irons. Last Orders was a...more
More about Graham Swift...
Waterland The Light of Day Tomorrow Wish You Were Here Ever After

Share This Book