An Intimate History of Killing: Face-to-Face Killing in Twentieth Century Warfare
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An Intimate History of Killing: Face-to-Face Killing in Twentieth Century Warfare

3.62 of 5 stars 3.62  ·  rating details  ·  82 ratings  ·  4 reviews
The characteristic act of men at war is not dying, but killing. Politicians and military historians may gloss over human slaughter, emphasizing the defense of national honor, but for men in active service, warfare means being - or becoming - efficient killers. In An Intimate History of Killing, historian Joanna Bourke asks: What are the social and psychological dynamics of...more
Paperback, 544 pages
Published November 27th 2000 by Basic Books (first published 1999)
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Hadrian
From the ethics of war, I now turn to violence in war. I read this, hoping for a little supplement to David Grossman's 'On Killing', and came away disappointed.

A blurb on the back claims that this is 'revisionist history', and yet I found nothing particularly revealing or new about this, especially after Grossman's book. War is primarily about killing the enemy, and this is a shock to some people! On several instances, I found that several of the sources are novels, which were interpreted and an...more
John
The author covers the evidence from four nations in four wars to document some elements that are obvious when you think about them and some the are counter-intuitive. On the obviousl side: killing is a tiny proportion of the act of war, as almost all the people and energy in involved are focused on transporting people and food from one place to antoher. On the counter-intuitive side, the tiny fraction of soldiers who actually kill people (as opposed to they large group involved in buying, transp...more
Işıl
it's one of those books that make you go "tell me something I don't know!" Such a huge dissappointment.
Caroline
Joanna was my old history professor and supervisor at Uni. A very happy time
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Joanna Bourke (born 1963 in New Zealand) is an historian and professor of history at Birkbeck, University of London.
More about Joanna Bourke...
Rape: Sex, Violence, History Fear: A Cultural History What It Means To Be Human The Second World War: A People's History Dismembering the Male: Men's Bodies, Britain, and the Great War

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