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The Collected Poems

4.11  ·  Rating Details ·  53 Ratings  ·  5 Reviews
Arguably the greatest African-American poet of the century, Sterling Brown was instrumental in bringing the traditions of African-American folk life to readers all over the world. This is the definitive collection of Brown's poems, and the only edition available in the U.S.
Paperback, 267 pages
Published April 8th 1996 by Triquarterly (first published 1980)
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Joe
Mar 14, 2015 Joe added it
Shelves: poetry
Father Missouri, in his dotage
Whimsical and drunkenly turbulent,
Cuts away the banks, steals away the loam,
Washes the ground from under wire fences,
Leaves fenceposts grotesquely dangling in the air;
And with doddering steps approaches the shanties.

Reading Brown for his allegorization of the river in Southern Road as a sharecropper's landlord/creepy old man waiting to swallow the work of the African American communities on its banks, how they chart systems of property which make these communities m
...more
Gerry LaFemina
Mar 27, 2015 Gerry LaFemina rated it really liked it
Sterling Brown brought the voices of African Americans and the blues to poetry. What he does with capturing diction and voice and form is powerful, and just when you think you have his aesthetic pegged, he does something different. Gritty, observant, biting, and emotionally relevant, these poems are a powerful testimony to an important strand of American literature.
Frank
Feb 01, 2015 Frank rated it it was amazing
Wonderful poems—bluesy, ironic, funny, shocking at times in an understated way, evocative of the long sweep and diversity of African American history and experience.
Meg Goss
Nov 16, 2014 Meg Goss rated it really liked it
For Modern American Poetry FA 2014
Scott
Jan 07, 2009 Scott rated it really liked it
I wish this were taught in schools instead of Langston Hughes.
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