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Pierre Bayard
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Who Killed Roger Ackroyd?: The Murderer Who Eluded Hercule Poirot And Deceived Agatha Christie

4.29  ·  Rating Details  ·  855 Ratings  ·  27 Reviews
Penzler Pick, August 2000: Edmund Wilson, the famous literary critic, once inquired disdainfully (in an essay explaining his inability to develop the mystery-reading habit), "Who Cares Who Killed Roger Ackroyd?" In a single sentence, with its reference to the notorious plot of Agatha Christie's sixth novel, The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, he struck deep at the collective spir ...more
Published (first published 1998)
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Ebtihal Abuali
هذا الكتاب هو ترجمة القول ان القراءة عملية ابداعية منتجة.

يبدأ بيار بالحديث عن فن القصة البوليسية، ما الذي يجعل منها قوية وناجحة، قبل ان ينطلق في تحليل النموذج.

ولا يكتفي بيار بقراءة رواية أجاثا كريستي (مقتل روجر اكرويد)، بل انه يشكك ويطرح التساؤلات فيما يحللها، ويستفيد من مساحة التأويل الموجودة فيها ليعرض وجهة نظر جديدة عن امكانية حل آخر للقصة. انه يستفيد من العلامات في القصة، ومن اصول الرواية البوليسية (وخرق أجاثا لها)، لكنه يضيف ايضا لمسة التحليل النفسي ليصل الى جوابه الخاص (من القاتل). وقد ك
...more
Corey
Aug 09, 2014 Corey rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This is truly a find. I recently recommended Bayard's other book (How to Talk About Books you Haven't Read) and am equally enthusiastic about this one. In this short but dense text, Bayard deconstructs one of Agatha Christie's most famous Hercule Poirot novels The Murder of Roger Ackroyd. (It helps to re-read Christie before embarking on Bayard.) Spoiler alert: for those of you who haven't read Christie--which is a mistake and you should add it along with The Mysterious Affair at Styles and The ...more
Ed
Jan 20, 2014 Ed rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
A really interesting re-evaluation of the Agatha Christie book "The Murder of Roger Ackroyd" in which Bayard suggests that another character is actually the murderer, not the character accused by Poirot and accepted by posterity. Bayard compares "Ackroyd" to similar Christie novels ("Endless Night" and "Curtain") as well as other works such as "Oedipus Rex". He examines the nature of delusions, Freud's psychoanalysis and the act of reading. A fascinating evaluation of both the classic book and t ...more
Bev
Mar 05, 2011 Bev rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Prakash
May 26, 2014 Prakash rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
April
Nov 29, 2014 April rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
This short book is really a thought exercise. What if Hercule Poirot got the solution wrong in The Murder of Roger Ackroyd? Bayard walks through every step and clue in the mystery, and he logically explains an alternate ending. I don't have a strong opinion on which ending is "correct;" the best argument is that the one Christie wrote is correct because it's canonical and that's all that matters. Regardless, I enjoyed reading it and putting my mind through the paces. This book is best when Barya ...more
Cathy Houston
the disection of the text of the Christie's classic mystery is wonderful to read; but I can't accept his premace that Poirot's deduction of Dr. Shepherd as the murderer is a psychotic delusion. I trust Poirot's little grey cells. but an interesting read all the same
Catherine Carpenter


Reads like a Doctoral Thesis in psychology. Filled with spoilers of almost the entire Christie oeuvre. And his new solution (I won't spoil it) is fairly lame and, like Christie, comes only in the final few pages. Christie, however, is entertaining.
Mark
Feb 28, 2015 Mark rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
No one I have read combines tongue-in-cheek interpretation with deadly serious analysis quite like Pierre Bayard. I think that Bayard's alternative solution to this mystery is a bit delusional; nevertheless, I had fun reading his spin despite some pretty turgid literary theory that gets in the way. I"ve now read the three Bayard books that have been translated into English - all have been worth reading. Definitely start with How to Talk about Books you Haven't Read

By the way, there's no point re
...more
Candice
May 02, 2016 Candice rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
g026r
Jan 10, 2011 g026r rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: non-fiction, 2011
Though heavier in the theory department than the subsequent Sherlock Holmes Was Wrong , Who Killed Roger Ackroyd? still shares some of that other works same flaws, in that Bayard occasionally pushes some of his theories and postulations to the near breaking point. Still, enjoyable in its own right, though definitely not recommended for Christie fans who have yet to make their way through the majority of her works (as spoilers aplenty abound).
Jon Frum
Aug 21, 2015 Jon Frum rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
I found this book too tedious to finish. Much of what I did read was just a re-hashing of Christie's book - "and then... and then... and then..." Not enough meat on the bone.
Bayneeta
May 12, 2009 Bayneeta rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: nonfiction
Read this in preparation for mystery book discussion at Addison. It is an academic book, not particularly light reading, and a translation from the French. The author is a psychoanalyst and professor of French literature in Paris. There's quite a bit of Freud and other psychoanalytical background information making this a tough book to skim. And even though it is only 160 pages including footnotes, I truly did want to skim it. The final section with the author's interpretation of who actually mu ...more
Oj
Apr 24, 2014 Oj rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
one of the best Novels of Agatha ever the ending is shocking and mind blowing just what i need and love
Lanea
Dec 31, 2015 Lanea rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
uneven
a lot of other works of christie
a lot of non-christie
Wendy Hellwig
Interesting, but didn't buy his theory.
Harvey
Jul 12, 2015 Harvey rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
- Bayard, a noted French Psychoanalyst, deconstructs Christie's famous novel and suggests, no, declares outright that Christie's solution was wrong. Hercule Poirot's "little grey cells" undergo a "psychic blindness" resulting in him fingering the wrong killer. All of the major characters (and a number of minor characters) have their "psyches" probed - and the result is wonderful. In the end, I entirely agree tat the doctor's wife, and not the doctor himself, most likely killed Ackroyd!
Hope
Jan 11, 2016 Hope rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Fascinating meditation on the mystery genre and the function of mystery plots. I'm surprised that Bayard doesn't compare Caroline Shepherd to Honoria in Murder Is Easy. So many parallels!
Nathan
Jan 08, 2011 Nathan rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: mystery
Way too many spoilers. This is written for an academic audience familiar with the entire Christie canon. I had to skip pages at a time to avoid list after list ruining twist endings.
Mimi
Jul 01, 2012 Mimi rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
French psychoanalyst and literature professor Bayard deconstructs Agatha Christie's famous mystery and comes up with a new, and more believable, suspect!
Meghan
Less dazzling than his later book in the same vein, Sherlock Holmes Was Wrong, but highly readable, clever, and ultimately persuasive
Liz
Jul 13, 2009 Liz rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: mystery
Loved the revisionist conclusion - actually more satisfying than the original! The psychology used to get there was less fun to read.
Paula
Dec 05, 2014 Paula rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I love anything this woman wrote! Whether it's Miss Marple, Hercule Poirot, or Harley Quinn....I will read it.
Britt, Book Habitue
Short but very dense. Maybe a little too dense in some places, but absolutely fascinating.
Quirkyreader
May 05, 2011 Quirkyreader rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Se my book review on my book blog: http://quirkyreader.livejournal.com/2...
Heidi
Some very sophisticated and unusual analysis.
Jilles
Nov 09, 2013 Jilles rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Great alternative solution!
Amie E. Mjos-Reisig
Amie E. Mjos-Reisig rated it really liked it
May 26, 2016
Ann
Ann marked it as to-read
May 26, 2016
Shelbylee
Shelbylee is currently reading it
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Pierre Bayard (born 1954) is a French author, professor of literature and connoisseur of psychology.

Bayard's recent book Comment parler des livres que l'on n'a pas lus?, or "How to talk about books you haven't read", is a bestseller in France and has received much critical attention in English language press.

A few of his books present revisionist readings of famous fictional mysteries. Not only do
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