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The Norton Anthology of World Literature, Volumes D, E, F: 1650 to the Present

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4.19 of 5 stars 4.19  ·  rating details  ·  2,262 ratings  ·  85 reviews
A legendary bestseller for more than forty years, this is the classic survey to the field from the Middle Ages to the twenty-first century.

With 274 authors, the Eighth Edition deepens its representation of essential works in all genres, ranging from Seamas Heaney's award-winning translation of Beowulf, Milton's Paradise Lost, and More's Utopia to the great poets and prose
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Paperback, Second Edition, 976 pages
Published July 1st 2003 by W. W. Norton & Company (first published 1962)
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Jessica
I am required by my department to teach from these anthologies, and I detest it. These anthologies would be fine for high school, but I resent not being trusted to select my own texts at the college level. More to the point of reviewing them: beware, young readers, beware! World Literature does not come from an anthology. Are we really to believe that on p.900 we can "read" a Native American chant? What are the problems inherent in selection? Let's include a few women, but not too many! A few no ...more
Quirkyreader
This was my father's book when he read literature at university.

It was a great introduction to English Lit. Especially since I lived in a rural farming community and TV and radio reception was spotty. Mum and Dad would tell us stories from the book and read aloud many of the poems.

It was a very important book to me. I used it when when I was at secondary school and university.

Ana Mardoll
The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vol. 2 / 0-393-95043-3

If you are looking at purchasing this book, you've either been required to purchase it for a college course, or you are considering investing in an English literature anthology for your own library and you want to know if this anthology is worth your money. If you are required to buy this book for a course, my review won't matter to you much one way or another, so this is slated towards the latter group.

This is an excellent resour
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Zafer Sattouf
Illuminating Passiveness: the Ultimate Wisdom in Nature
William Wordsworth is universally known as a great poet whose poems played a tremendous role and was one of most influential and leading figures in the emergence of Romanticism. He published his collection of poems, known as the Lyrical Ballads, in 1798, which was around the beginnings of the Romantic era of the British literature. One of his poems in the Lyrical Ballads is called Expostulation and Reply, in which Wordsworth emphasizes on
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Helen Murray
I've marked this book as read (on the basis that I've spent hours and hours of study time going through the notes, essays and references, and have probably dipped into every text in the book at least superficially). However, I don't actually think this is the kind of book you ever really finish.

First of all, it is a textbook. A literal book of texts. An attempt to encompass a literary canon, or rather three literary canons, the Romantic, Victorian and Modern eras. It is, therefore of a monstrou
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Gary Mesick
Criticize the Norton if you dare. For value in teaching (and studying) a survey course, there just isn't anything better. And I think their passages from longer works are generally right on the money. The only problem is that, without the context of the larger work, the passages sometimes don't make sense. Still, this is it. The required reading, in condensed form. Good luck.
Christina
I rely heavily on all my Norton Anthology volumes. They have chicken scratches throughout the pages, are falling apart but I cherish them.
Danica Page (One Page at a Time)
I actually really liked almost of all the works in this anthology. I love the Norton Anthologies.
Saba10002
Jul 27, 2007 Saba10002 rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: every body who wants to know
My Holy Book
Rhesa
Apr 09, 2009 Rhesa is currently reading it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: literature
While Volume 1 of this awesome Norton Anthology of English Literature primarily covers the Middle Ages, The 16th century, the early 17th century & The 18th century, this 2nd volume deals with Romantic Period [Blake, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats etc), The Victorian Age (Carlyle, Cardinal Newman, Bronte, Huxley etc) and the 20th century (Hardy, Shaw, Yeats, Joyce, T.S Eliot, Orwell, Beckett, Morrison etc).

I bought this book back in 2002 in Borders Bookstore for only S$12! Isn’t
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Melinda Belle Harrison
I finally finished this big textbook. I did skip a few at the end, like James Joyce and a couple of others. It took me two months plus a week to read through most of the selections. I'd say I read 85% of them this time around, more than I would have read in a classroom.

I am a big fan of Victorian novels and I wanted to read some essays, poetry, and see how 19th century British literature evolved. There is an interesting and old group on the Internet, a group of writers who call themselves, Pre-J
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Elisa
As I said for volume A, volume B is one of my textbooks for school and so I only did the assigned readings for the class. I thoroughly enjoyed all of the pieces I read and I have plans to read this volume from start to finish at some point, however, I will say that a lot of fantastic English authors are not represented for the 20th and 21st centuries which makes me a bit sad. Other than that, I think it’s a fairly good survey of writers as far as the lauded Canon goes. I’m only going to do small ...more
Jordan
Sep 16, 2007 Jordan rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Brit Lit fans, Victorian Lit fans
Shelves: literature, poetry
This was one of my textbooks (for my "Victorian Literature" calss in New Zealand), but I think anyone who is interested in great literature would find the investment wise. It covers the time periods from The Romantic Period (1785-1830) to the The Victorian Age (1830-1901) and ending with The Twentieth Century. Obviously, in my class we only covered a touch of the Romantic stuff and the Victorian selections. We didn't touch the 20th Century at all. Like I do with all my Norton textbooks, I'm goin ...more
rebecca
Sep 27, 2007 rebecca rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: everyone who likes books with "words" in them
poems, essays, plays, etc.s from the romantic period, the victorian age, and the twentieth century.

for example (i.e. my bookmarks are at places like)...

"water, water, everywhere,
and all the boards did shrink [can you guess where this is going?];
water, water, everywhere,
nor any drop to drink."

mariana (the tennyson poem)

love among the ruins (the robert browning poem)

lines written in kensington gardens (the matthew arnold poem) (and if you don't know matthew arnold yet, then you should check this o
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Dave
This was my college textbook in the 60's. I despised having to carry it around, but I found an awful lot of good literature in it. I most clearly remember the Victorian poets. Tennyson's Mariana, a favorite among my female classmates frequently comes to mind.

Considering that the contents, aside from critical commentary are long past copyright protection, just about all the volume's numerous contents must be widely available gratis through the technological ether.
Mandy
This was much easier to read than volume one. We were finally able to read something other than ballads, epics, and, poetry this semester. I know it is strange to some, but I just loved reading the works of Wollstonecraft, Coleridge,Shelley, Austen, Browning, and one of my new favorites Tennyson. There is something empowering in taking a work that at first seems impossible to comprehend and then breaking it down and unveiling the absolute beauty of words.
Diana Bliss
I love this anthology. I have been reading it since high school because I love variety and this has an excellent collection of samples from some of the best authors that have ever lived. That alone makes it worth the effort but it also opens doors to genre I might not have discovered otherwise.
Kaethe
This was the text for my second semester senior English class in high school. I understand the teacher retired after that year to take a job driving buses or something. I wouldn't blame him, because I doubt if he got much out of the six of us. But he was the best literature professor I ever had.
sologdin
anthologies suck in general, because their animating concept is just a bad idea--they are in fact the special bearer of the Form of the Bad Idea. (is that even possible? is there a form of an idea, i.e., of a form itself, a metaform? because that'd be fuckin' crazy, yo. or is it just a form of an idea that's merely inside someone's head, and istherefore a copy of a form that inside the form of someone's head, or what?)

Norton anthologies are double-suck because the editorial policy is horrible as
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Ahmet Uçar
Norton Anthologies are perfectly prepared books. 3 thousand pages stuck in one volume of very thin but great quality paper. A great publication. All the texts within are prepared so professionally. its awesome.
Must have for any English major.
S. Sloan
I read Vol.2 of The Norton Anthology in my English Literature II class. After taking the class and reading both volume 1 & 2, I now have a great appreciation for English Literature.
Kjell-W
Bought this for my English course back in the day. Have read some parts, but I aim to get through this one day.
Julie
Obviously i have not read every page. But i refer to it on occasion to read and re-read some of my favourite poetry. A very comprehensive set, which took me AGES to save up for, and my course was only 6 months from finishing by the time i got my own copies. Ah well. Money well spent. I keep returning to those wonderful Romantics, particularly Keats and Shelley (or is that Sheets and Kelley??), and Blake. I also love Tennyson, and the Pre-Raphaelites--though I don't think there is enough Pre-Raph ...more
Robin
I like this series of textbooks. Each section has a clear, concise introduction to different aspects of that theme. It provides brief, informative biographies on each author. It includes a wide variety of authors and poets to choose from. There is no way you could cover everything in this book in one semester. It has wonderful footnotes to help clarify archaic words and phrases as well. All this is presented without any kind of opinion or critique, leaving the passages open for debate or persona ...more
Monique
I read this book for school.
Hannah
I enjoyed most of the author introductions, though some of the information felt irrelevant. I got a kick out of some of the footnotes. Some were completely redundant, and made me feel like this book caters towards middle or high schoolers. Other than that, this is a relatively comprehensive book about British literature from the Romantic Period to the 20th century (includes many works from important authors).
Kristin
Great collection of texts, though I have to admit that what really tickled my fancy was the footnote by the Norton group within one of Oscar Wilde's plays: "Although Australia had originally been a place to which criminals were banished, it was, by this time [1890s], like Canada, a place to which families might send harmless but useless members, who would be paid an allowance to remain abroad."
Katie
this is actually my textbook for a british lit class, but i have fallen in love with it. the selections are wonderful, and the introductions and footnotes are all clear and useful. i suppose i have a love-hate relationship with most of the romantics, but i found myself leaning towards loving them somehow--though perhaps that had more to do with the class itself.
Noah
I have not, obviously, read this book cover to cover (anyone who has done so has my deepest respect), though I have plowed through it in a concentrated manner these past few weeks while studying for the GRE subject test in literature. I put them up, therefore, just to note that they are very good resources and helped me quite a bit while studying.
Jen (Fefferbooks)
The only university book I ever kept. It covers the Romantic Period (1785-1830; Burns, Mary Wollstonecraft, and Coleridge), which I so loved, through the Victorian (1830-1901; John Stuart Mill, Robert Browning, Wilde), and on on through the Twentieth Century (Housman, Auden, and...not much else. :). Good stuff. I love the Brits.
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Goodreads Librari...: Norton Anthologies - Edition Descriptions 1 28 Nov 27, 2011 06:14PM  
  • The Norton Anthology of American Literature: Volumes A & B
  • The Norton Anthology of World Masterpieces
  • The Norton Shakespeare
  • The Norton Anthology of American Literature
  • The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction
  • The Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry
  • The Norton Anthology Of Literature By Women: The Traditions In English
  • The Norton Anthology of Poetry
  • The Penguin Dictionary of Literary Terms and Literary Theory
  • Perrine's Literature: Structure, Sound, and Sense
  • The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism
  • Contemporary American Poetry
  • The Norton Anthology of Western Literature, Volume 1
  • Romanticism: An Anthology with CD-ROM
  • Literature: A Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, Drama, and Writing, Interactive Edition (12th Edition)
  • The Rise of the Novel
  • Oroonoko, the Rover, and Other Works
  • The Major Works
28115
Meyer Howard Abrams is an American literary critic, known for works on Romanticism, in particular his book The Mirror and the Lamp. In a powerful contrast, Abrams shows that until the Romantics, literature was usually understood as a mirror, reflecting the real world, in some kind of mimesis; but for the Romantics, writing was more like a lamp: the light of the writer's inner soul spilled out to i ...more
More about M.H. Abrams...
The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Volume 1: The Middle Ages through the Restoration & the Eighteenth Century The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vol. B: The Sixteenth Century & The Early Seventeenth Century A Glossary of Literary Terms The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vol. A: Middle Ages The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vol. E: The Victorian Age

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