Dansatoarea din Izu
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Dansatoarea din Izu

3.81 of 5 stars 3.81  ·  rating details  ·  927 ratings  ·  56 reviews
Povestirile lui Kawabata au frumusetea unor stampe japoneze, delicatetea si echivocul lor incarcat de semnificatii subterane. Textul care da titlul volumului - Dansatoarea din Izu - este considerat la piece de resistance; singuratatea si prima dragoste, cautarea de sine, granita precara dintre inocenta copilariei si constiinta propriei sexualitati - acestea sunt temele pre...more
Paperback, 224 pages
Published 2008 by Humanitas Fiction (first published 1953)
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Praj
"As death approaches, memory erodes. Recent memories are the first to succumb. Death works its way backward until it reaches memory's earliest beginnings. Then memory flares up for an instant, just like a flame about to go out. That is the "prayer in the mother tongue."

A string of solemn words sprint from my mind onto my lips at slight picture of a funeral that passes on the street. With my hands pressed palm to palm; expressing gratitude to the death a prayer in the mother tongue, “Bless the de...more
Ema
I'm hovering between 3 and 4 stars for this book and I can't decide, because I liked some of the stories, others depressed me, while one in particular was horrifying. I mostly feel like a superficial and uninitiated reader who stood at the foot of a complex work, but was not able to grasp it. Moreover, I let my personal weaknesses flood my perceiving of Kawabata's writing, judging it and condemning it for the uncomfortable and unbearable feelings he aroused inside me.

I don't even know whom to re...more
David
Five stars for "The Dancing Girl..." Classic Kawabata in many respects, but there's also sobbing on a random schoolboy at the end.

The rest of the stories were lacking in sustenance, I felt. Shikoku had a few mentions, about which I was a faintly excited, but they've rather put me off the other Palm-of-the-Hand Stories. And without them I'll never achieve "Kawabata Completion"! Is it just me, but does "palm-of-the-hand" sound like they're supposed to be a bit raunchy?
Emeraldia Ayakashi
5 new exemplary beauty, sometimes tight and will require breaks and reflection (or even several readings) to understand the full meaning. 5 news that we speak of love with subtlety and unspoken, old age and beauty of death exacerbates sensations and feelings.
5 new contemplative and poetic that emphasizes the impermanence and transience of happiness in life.

"The danseuze Izu" is the first publication of Kawabata. This new, published in 1926, made him famous man who would become one of the greates...more
Terri
For anyone who has watched a loved one slip away from dementia, old age, or illness, the autobiographical story "Diary of My Sixteenth Year" contained in this book will be both painfully familiar and oddly comforting. The other stories are also beautiful and haunting - I especially like the Money Road. The collection of short, short stories at the end are all challenging - their meaning isn't always clear, but they are beautiful and will stay with you for a long long time.
Sus
"The Izu Dancer" is really good, but the Yashashi Inoue stories are somewhat disappointing. (Is it just me, or is it excessively misleading to title a book "XXX And Other Stories," without mentioning in the title that the three "other stories" are by a completely different, stylistically distant, and much less well-known and well-respected author than that of the title-story "XXX"? Yeeeeah. Classy marketing move there, Tuttle. Seriously, WTF -- if you think you need to _deceive_ people into read...more
Gertrude & Victoria
This collection of short stories by Kawabata Yasunari demonstrates his meticulous attention to detail. The Dancing Girl of Izu and Other Stories are an exquisite blend of artistry and imagination. The popular title story, set in a rustic landscape between sea, mountain and sky, The Dancing Girl of Izu is beautiful look into the world of a dancing troupe and their customs of work, rest and play.

Kawabata, the first Japanese novelist to win the Nobel Prize is more like a sculptor than a painter, in...more
mehran memarzadeh
The Dancing Girl of Izu", (Japanese: 伊豆の踊り子, izu no odoriko) published in 1926, was the first work of literature by Japanese author Yasunari Kawabata to achieve great popular and critical acclaim. The short story was first translated into English by Edward Seidensticker and published in an abridged form in The Atlantic Monthly in 1952. A complete English translation of the story was made by J. Martin Holman and appeared in a collection of Kawabata's early literature published as The Dancing Girl...more
Madalina
This was a Christmas present from a friend, that is, I don't usually read this kind of books so I can't compare it to a better one. For me it was a five star. In a very close personal manner you get to know the simple, ordinary workings of a student, of an old wife, of an abandoned lover, of a young wife who lived in innocence, and a naive girl who never knew she'd been in love, of countless other people that you see through the narrator's mind's eye.
Mike
I only like a few of the "palm of the hand" stories that make up the second half of this book, but I still have to give the 4 stars because of how much I love the title story (The dancing girl of Izu), which I've read now maybe 4, 5, or 6 times in the last 25 years. One of my favorite short stories of all time for sure, and I would definitely give it 5 stars if it were published by itself.
Veronika KaoruSaionji
The Dancing Girl of Izu is beautiful story about tender and pure love young boy for young girl. It is so cute! I does not like heterosexual romance, but I very like it. The other stories are similar nice. This and Sound of the mountain is my favourite by Kawabata.
Dini
Ternyata oh ternyata buku ini ada juga di Goodreads. Seingat saya waktu membacanya beberapa tahun lalu cerita-cerita di dalamnya cukup unik (ini cara lain mengatakan kalau saya nggak begitu ngerti ceritanya, hehehe).
Motorcycle
I read some of these stories, including The Dancing Girl of Izu to my students. I like Kawabata, but find his style of confessional autobiography a little unsettling some times. I was once like that.
Michael
Probably closer to a 4.5. This is an interesting collection of 4 short stories. The title story is by Kawabata while the other 3 are by Yasushi Inoue. This book was published in the early 70's, a couple of years after Kawabata received the Nobel Prize for Literature. So I am not that surprised that his name and stories are slapped upon many book of that period. "The Izu Dancer" is magnificently sparse and its reputation as a classic is well founded but i have enjoyed all things Kawabata so far....more
Fajar
Ketika saya melihat buku ini di rak perpustakaan dan berkenan meminjamnya, ada satu hal yang belum saya sadari sepenuhnya : bahwa karya dari Kawabata Yasunari bukanlah sekedar pembunuh waktu ataupun hiburan belaka. Tulisan-tulisannya merupakan buah kerja perenungan yang dalam, kesunyian yang dibutuhkan, demi melahirkan suatu kesan yang menembus sampai kepada perasaan.

Ada lima cerita pendek ( novelet ) yang terangkum, hasil terjemahan langsung dari bahasa aslinya. Setiap cerita di dalam buku ini,...more
Tessa
Have you ever read a book and felt it was more than just a book? Because that is how The Dancing Girl of Izu was/is for me. It's a song, a painting, a fleeting dream, a memory hold dear by someone left behind for me to see and feel.
Yasunari Kawabata is definitely a genius. It's rare to see such simple feelings transcending into one's mind while reading a book. The stories don't concentrate on the action, but more on the people and their feelings, toughs, aspirations and dreams. This books feels...more
Hugo
This is a book about death. Not the most original subject, yet nonetheless it is done here with a startling power. In my view there are two main elements to Kawabata’s success.

The first is brevity. The book is short, the stories in the book are short, the sentences and the words are short. And because the words are so sparse, it is the spaces between the words that engulf the reader, that must be filled by the reader’s own feelings. Kawabata understands that death is an awful gaping thing which...more
Jim
You ever feel when you are reading a book, especially by someone well-regarded in the literary world, as if you are standing before an abstract piece of art (say, a Rothko), and you say to yourself, "I don't get it?" Well, that is how I kind of felt. These short stories were better than being buffaloed by a piece of abstract art, but nonetheless I wasn't overly impressed either. The stories seemed very personal (perhaps autobiographical) and several were insightful commentaries on Japanese cultu...more
Brian
A book of short stories that offers a sampling of two great writers, Yasunari Kawabata and Yasushi Inoue.

The title story, The Izu Dancer is by Kawabata and is about a small troupe of traveling performers and a student infatuated with their young drummer girl. A beautiful little piece.

Inoue's contributions include The Counterfeiter, Obasute, and The Full Moon. All three stories deal with separation, loneliness, and alienation. Inoue takes the isolation, the loneliness of the character... a minor...more
Raul
This collection is more apt for those who are already familiar and fans of Yasunari Kawabata's style and work. Although I didn't really connect with most of it, encountering this striking metaphor from A Prayer in the Mother Tongue made it all worthwhile:

"...a prayer in the mother tongue, far from being an old human convention to which we are inextricably bound, is perhaps a means of emotional support. Humankind, with its long history, is by now a corpse bound to a tree with the ropes of convent...more
Imawan
susunan kalimatnya unik..
Ana
The dancing girl of Izu tells about puppy love, but, as we all now, puppy love is love in its truest and most honest form. It is love without thinking, infatuation that capture a young person`s heart in an instant and, though it may not last long, people tend to have the fondest memories of it in their older days.

As far as the Moon over water goes, it is a tale of fear and love, or rather, the fear of loving and being loved, the fear of letting someone see our true beauty, as we are often not aw...more
Juan Carlos
Ya he leido dos libros de Kawabata, sin aspavientos ni gruesos tomos logra narrar historias que quedan como imágenes simples en la memoria, instantáneas de emociones que atraviezan la corteza y dan el blanco en zonas más profundas de nuestro cerebro. Lamentablemente, resulta evidente que la traducción no es una que haga justicia, el fondo queda, se vislumbra, pero la forma se aprecia defectuosa, y no me cabe duda que en el japonés original, estas obras brillan con otros matices, esto es una lást...more
Dyah Setyowati
Berisi 5 cerita penulisnya yang setiap cerita menceritakan tentang kehidupan penari-penari Jepang, yang bermain dalam revue. Semua ceritanya menimbulkan kesan tersendiri yang cukup dalam. Yang paling suka adalah cerita urutan ketiga dalam buku itu yang berjudul “Niji” yang artinya “Pelangi”. Itu cerita paling menoreh di hati. Cerita yang pertama dan keempat juga bagus. Cerita kedua pendek pisan. Cerita kelima aneh dan gak-ngerti-tau-ah.
thegift
another Kawabata that is rated according to the very good title story, if you know what you are reading are prose poems, if you like understated, quiet, allusive work where emotional content comes in momentary flashes of images. not for anyone who likes long, long stories. do not know Japanese so it could be all translation, but do find it sometimes very beautiful...

http://www.michaelkamakana.com/wp-adm...
eti
#68 - 2013

saya banyak berhenti membaca cerita ini. bukan karena bosan. bukan itu. tapi saya banyak membayangkan apa yang Tuan Kawabata tuliskan. saya membayangkan suasana Jepang, membayangkan hutan dan rumah-rumah pedesaan, aliran sungai bebatuan, lembab tanah di jalan setapak, hutan pinus/tusam, bunga sakura, salju, panggung pertunjukkan, bilik rias para penari, dan banyak lagi. juga kesunyian di setiap ceritanya. sepi.
Andrea
~Igračica iz Izua~ i ~Mjesec na vodi~ divne su pripovjetke inspirisane njegovim životom. Čitajući ova djela "prebacila" sam se u Kavabatin voljeni Japan, i stvari posmatrala onakvim kakve zaista jesu. Divno opisani međuljudski odnosi su me očarali, stidljivi pogledi između pisca i igračice koji nisu svjesni svojih stvarnih osjećaja, a tek pejzaž jesenjeg Japana.
Morate pročitati ovu knjigu, jednostavno morate.
Diego CL
El libro me hizo sentir mal. Es un tributo a la muerte y al gran sufrimiento que el autor tuvo en su vida. La descripción de su relación con el abuelo es terrible. Muy buen libro pero muy mala la sensación que provoca.
Ravi Jain
I have never read Kawabata and thought I would pick this up in advance of a trip to Japan. I read the title story and was captivated.

But the translation felt clunky. So I got another translation, this time just of Kawabata's stories, and the translation felt clunkier still.

See my full review at: http://sillyputtyreview.blogspot.com/...
Ellsa Mayo
Kawabata yasunari termasuk sastrawan besar jepang yg meninggal krn bunuh diri. Karya2nya msh dikenal hingga skrg di jepang. Buku ini berisi cerita2 pendek yg mungkin krg bisa ditelaah oleh pembaca. Namun hal itu menurut saya lebih disebabkan oleh karakter orang jepang yang detil dalam memandang dan menilai sesuatu, juga karena didasari imajinasi yg tinggi.

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8550
Yasunari Kawabata (川端 康成) was a Japanese short story writer and novelist whose spare, lyrical, subtly-shaded prose works won him the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1968, the first Japanese author to receive the award. His works have enjoyed broad international appeal and are still widely read.
More about Yasunari Kawabata...
Snow Country Thousand Cranes Beauty and Sadness House of the Sleeping Beauties and Other Stories The Sound of the Mountain

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