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Traditional Japanese Poetry: An Anthology

4.42  ·  Rating Details ·  57 Ratings  ·  5 Reviews
This anthology brings togethere in convenient form a rich selection of Japanese poetry in traditional genres dating back from the earliest times to the twentieth century. With more than 1,100 poems, it is the most varied and comprehensive selection of traditional Japanese poetry now available in English.

Ezra Pound called poetry "the most concentrated form of verbal express
...more
Paperback, 536 pages
Published April 1st 1993 by Stanford University Press (first published April 1st 1991)
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Bruce
Feb 11, 2016 Bruce rated it it was amazing
I found this anthology to be fascinating. When he published the book in 1991, Steven Carter was Professor of Japanese at the University of California, Irvine. He is the translator of the poems (more than 1100) in this volume and has written a very helpful introduction, summaries of various historical periods, and annotations of individual poems. The sections and individual poems are arranged chronologically, and usually a particular poet’s works are grouped together. The organization of the boo ...more
Kitty
Feb 14, 2010 Kitty rated it really liked it
Overview of Japanese poetry with the original and notes on translation. I have a better understanding of Haiku and the traditions surrounding it. I enjoyed very much the black and white drawings sprinkled throughout which capture a mood or time period. This is a book to be enjoyed multiple and endless several sittings.
Farah SA
Apr 26, 2011 Farah SA rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A must-read for students of Japanese and anyone who is interested in Japanese, especially the poetry. This book tells us about (brief) history of Japanese poetry, not only haiku but also other form of Japanese poetry.
Gary
Sep 05, 2011 Gary is currently reading it
Shelves: poetry
Just now diving in!
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6897287
Arakida Moritake (荒木田 守武, *1473) was a Japanese poet who excelled in the fields of waka, renga, and in particular haikai. He studied renga with Sōgi. He was a Shintoist, and the son of Negi Morihide and grandson of Fujinami Ujitsune. At the age of 69, he became head priest of the Inner Ise Shrine.
More about Arakida Moritake...

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“A fallen blossom
returning to the bough, I thought --
But no, a butterfly.”
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