A Moveable Feast
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A Moveable Feast

4.03 of 5 stars 4.03  ·  rating details  ·  55,650 ratings  ·  4,030 reviews
"If you are lucky enough to have lived in Paris as a young man, then wherever you go for the rest of your life, it stays with you, for Paris is a moveable feast."

- ERNEST HEMINGWAY, to a friend, 1950

Published posthumously in 1964, A Moveable Feast remains one of Ernest Hemingway's most beloved works. It is his classic memoir of Paris in the 1920s, filled with irreverent po...more
Paperback, 181 pages
Published September 6th 2012 by Vintage (first published 1964)
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Jeffrey Keeten
”If you are lucky enough to have lived in Paris as a young man, then wherever you go for the rest of your life, it stays with you, for Paris is a moveable feast.” Ernest Hemingway

 photo Hemingway-in-Paris_zps43d437ec.jpg
Hemingway in Paris

I hadn’t planned to read this book until I read this great article in the The Atlantic that was published recently by Joe Fassler that consists of a conversation he had with Daniel Woodrell. This article which whether you care one wit about Woodrell or for that matter Ernest Hemingway is still an insp...more
Ellen
Though often containing gorgeous prose, Hemingway’s A Moveable Feast has a clear agenda. The book treats Hemingway’s life in Paris from 1921 to 1926. Although the book clearly is autobiographical, in the Preface, Hemingway, after explaining that several items were left out of his memoir, then suggests, rather coyly, that “If the reader prefers, this book may be regarded as fiction” and adds, “But there is always the chance that such a book of fiction may throw some light on what has been written...more
Julie
If you haven't been to Paris, you just won't get A Moveable Feast...
If you aren't already a fan of Hemingway, don't bother reading A Moveable Feast

Look, I'm struggling to get a start on this review and those were the first two statements that popped into my head. I don't know if they are true. I don't know if they are fair. What I do know is this work - fiction, memoir, sketches, a polished diary - whichever of these it may be - wouldn't exist without Paris. Obviously, right? No, that's not wh...more
Kirk
Whenever a friend/Roman/lover/countryman/debtor/student/
jackass bar brawler tells me that Hemingway lost it after THE SUN ALSO RISES or (being generous) A FAREWELL TO ARMS, I say: read this book. There are moments of vile approbation. It saddens me infinitely to hear EH bang on Gertrude and Scott, and some of the dialogue is transparently punchdrunk. But when I want to read a book by someone who lost his shit and knew he lost it spectularly, this be the one. There are few passages more self-recr...more
Larissa
Reading A Moveable Feast was a strange combination of pure pleasure and pure torture for me. On one hand, what could be better than reading a pseudo-memoir written by the unabashedly self-absorbed, and yet enduringly charming, Hemingway--all white wine, manliness, and burgeoning craft, with an excess of anecdotes and remembrances (often unflattering and unfair, god bless him) of his eccentric and luminous contemporaries? Not much. Especially with such memories: of Gertrude "Aldous Huxley writes...more
Diane
To paraphrase ol' Hem, "This is a fine and true book. It is honest and good, and the stories are important and just."

Hem, as I shall forever call him now, wrote this memoir just a few years before he died in 1961. It's about Hem and his first wife, Hadley, when they were young and poor in Paris in the '20s, and Hem would borrow books from the famous Shakespeare & Co. bookstore, and he would go to cafes to write.

While there are stories about other writers in Paris at the time -- such as F. S...more
Eric
I decided to bail after his visit to the indoor bicycle races, like dance marathons one of those frantic displays of recreational endurance so popular in the 1920s. A quick comparing look at Joseph Roth’s account of a night at Berlin’s tracked bicycle races, in What I Saw, convinced me that I was wasting my time with Hemingway. There are better books. Hemingway’s style will always strike me as more or less mannered and ridiculous, but what I read of A Moveable Feast was especially bad—solemn, po...more
Brad
A Moveable Feast is a beautiful book. Gorgeous. The prose is Hemingway-crisp, concise and evocative, but even with the Ezra Pound love fest midway through the book (fascinatingly against the grain in an America predisposed to loathe the poet for his ties to Nazism), A Moveable Feast isn’t A Moveable Feast until Scott Fitzgerald and Zelda appear on the scene.

Fans of Fitzgerald’s probably cringe at Papa’s descriptions of the Scott’s sad debasement. Zelda is a mad bitch; Scott is a drunken man-chi...more
Sue
Read immediately after The Paris Wife, this is like a book end on the 1920s in Paris, a photo of a writer's life in writing, as a husband and father, as a member of the ex-patriot community in Europe. There are glimpses of his writing process, his friendships (or maybe more properly relationships) with other writers, artists and luminaries large and small, his apparent love for his son and wife.

All is masked as fiction but reads as real life. There are quotes upon quotes to mention.


"I thought o...more
Chiara Pagliochini

“Ma Parigi era una città molto vecchia e noi eravamo giovani e lì non c’era niente di facile, neanche la miseria, né i soldi improvvisi, né il chiaro di luna, né la ragione e il torto né il respiro di qualcuno sdraiato al tuo fianco al chiaro di luna.”

Sono sempre stata una persona di facili innamoramenti e di odi inspiegabili, repentini, istintivi. Ma giacché sono anche molto lunatica o debole di carattere o democratica, è facile che i miei odi si trasformino altrettanto inspiegabilmente e repen...more
James Spina
Oct 10, 2008 James Spina rated it 1 of 5 stars Recommends it for: Ernie's great and not-so-great grandchildren
I'm heading for Paris on a work related trip in a few weeks so I thought I'd get in the mood by dipping into papa. BIG MISTAKE. I guess you had to be there. This is nothing but a bunch of mundane moments strung together by some boring name dropping and squalid hygiene habits.
I've never really been a fan of anything other than Ernie's shorter stories and now I remember why. He didn't write briefly for effect. He did it because he didn't really know enough words. It always sounds like he's peeking...more
Teresa
This memoir (Hemingway coyly says in the preface that the reader may consider it fiction), with its idyllic tone, surely romanticizes Hemingway's life in France with his first wife and their child. It includes rather unflattering portraits of Stein, Madox Ford and the Fitzgeralds, while certainly leaving out things that would've made Hemingway himself look bad. But, perhaps, it is as he says here of his fiction writing: what is omitted is what strengthens the story.

I enjoyed the style, the stor...more
Kim

In this slim volume, originally edited by Hemingway's fourth wife and widow Mary Hemingway and published after his death, Hemingway relates stories from his years in Paris in the 1920s, when he was married to his first wife, Hadley. The narrative features Hemingway's friends and acquaintances, including F Scott Fitzgerald, Gertrude Stein, Sylvia Beach, Ezra Pound and Ford Madox Ford. The details of this time in Paris include the names and locations of bars, cafés and hotels, as well as details o...more
Cait
It's official. I'm a gossip whore. Try as I might to deny it, I love hearing the dirt on other people. It should come as no surprise then that my favorite sections of this books were about Hemingway's relationships with Gertrude Stein and (especially) F. Scott Fitzgerald. Holy crap, who knew Hemingway was a gossip whore too? The man can really dish it out. I'm embarrassingly unfamiliar with the Stein christened "Lost Generation" though, so I don't know whether to take what he says with a grain o...more
David Lentz
During the early days of Hemingway's career Paris was was the most prolific writer's colony on the planet. The cost of living was cheap, the wine and food were good, and Paris attracted the talents of James Joyce, Ezra Pound, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ford Maddox Ford among others. Paris was truly a moveable feast in his day and, although Hemingway was poor at age 25, he was devoted to a career in which his primary objective was to capture a true sentence and then to follow it with another. This s...more
Evan
To say that Hemingway writes clear, declarative sentences would be far too simplistic and inaccurate. I actually find his sentences twisty and harder to read oftentimes than more flowery and "correct" prose written in a more classical parallel fashion. I do miss the breather commas, for instance, in places where the conjunctions separate what are actually different clauses, which sometimes causes me to have to read the sentences twice. Honestly, I've never been a great fan of the way Hemingway w...more
Marco Tamborrino
«Ecco cosa siete. Ecco che cosa siete, voialtri» disse la signorina Stein. «Tutti voi giovani che avete fatto la guerra. Siete una generazione perduta.»

Io e il signor Ernest Hemingway, chiamato da tutti - amici e non - soltanto col nomignolo di Hem, ci siamo seduti ai Lilas per berci un po' di whiskey in santa pace mentre parlavamo dei rispettivi romanzi. Hem mi ha detto che scrivo da cani, che mi metto a parlare di cose che non c'entrano un cazzo e che i personaggi non potranno mai pensare. Io...more
Diane D.
I am not finished yet, but I love this book. I am googling many names as I read this (Ezra Pound, Ford Madox Ford, Ernest Walsh, Gertrude Stein). Honestly, I never would have picked this up if I hadn't read The Paris Wife, and I think this book is a wonderful companion to it. I also like the order in which I read them: The Paris Wife first and this one second.

This book is a memoir, with the vignettes written by Hemingway himself. Here is a favorite part I just read (Bumby is his and Hadley's ch...more
Gary aka Grasshopper

Ernest Hemingway is a very good writer; his recollections of his early days in Paris have become the stuff of legend. What he is not, is a good husband, father or friend. Overall this is a mean-spirited attempt to assuage his guilt about dumping his first wife and to win some imaginary competition between himself and F. Scott Fitzgerald. He succeeds at neither but that doesn't change the fact that this is always entertaining and intermittently very funny. I intend to read more things by him. He...more
James
A Moveable Feast is a set of sketches Hemingway wrote about his days in Paris, when he was getting his start as a writer. Some of the more interesting pieces cover his friendships with Gertrude Stein, F. Maddox Ford, Evan Shipman, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ezra Pound. He also portrays his life with his first wife Hadley in a somewhat rose-tinted fashion, making them both seem a bit too flawless compared with their older, more weathered ex-pat friends. But that’s Hemingway’s way, I guess. The subtl...more
Cheryl
Remember where and when you were most satisfied intellectually and physically, stimulated to just the right measure, and your talents seemed limitless? In Hemingway's case, all this and more came to fruition in Paris in the 1920s.

Supported by friends like Sylvia Beach of Shakespeare and Company lending library and book store, mentors like James Joyce, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Gertrude Stein, Hemingway's youth, talent, and curiosity peaked in the City of Light. Sparsely written with the maturity o...more
David
Lost excerpts from A Moveable Feast:

When we were driving, I thought 'Scott is pretty like a woman' and it was true that he was a bit womanlike. He was often moody and irrational, and gave me strange looks and strange pointed questions. Sometimes I thought I didn't like Scott much. Or anyway, not as he seemed to like me, in his way. Though he looked damned good in that hat.

***

It wasn't until we left Paris that I realized what a strange place it was, with such strange people. There was no one quit...more
Fewlas
Per diciotto anni della mia vita (che ne conta fino ad oggi 28) ho avuto sotto gli occhi scaffali su scaffali pieni zeppi di tutto ciò che Hemingway ha scritto. Ogni tanto prendevo a caso uno di questi libri, ne leggevo tre o quattro righe e lo riponevo molto in fretta. Poi me ne sono andata di casa e, manco a farlo apposta, il mio piano di studi all’università non prevedeva nessun esame di letteratura angloamericana, quindi io me la sono studiata da sola, ogni tanto frequentavo le lezioni di qu...more
René
What a fascinating read!

Hemingway’s legend precedes and slanders him. What image we have of him, magnified by the myriad portrayals and caricatures of the man in film and literature, utterly fails to capture the essence of the man as a writer.

Reading ‘A Moveable Feast’, Hemingway’s memoirs of Paris, I was at first frowning at the simplicity of the wording, thinking that the lack of nuance was abandoning much depth of experience, until details thrown out in stark contrast to the canvas started c...more
Becca
May 10, 2008 Becca rated it 5 of 5 stars Recommends it for: all people who appreciate beautiful language
Easily on my top 10 list of all time. Hemingway's memoirs from when he lived in Paris. My friend, who hates Hemingway, loved this one. More beautifully written than anything I've ever read, you'll get a kick out of what he has to say about the other American writers living in Paris at the time. It'll break your heart and make you cry but you'll be a more grateful person when you're through.
Joselito Honestly and Brilliantly
I've had a lot of those, when I was also in my mid-20's like Hemingway here, when everywhere I looked I saw pretty girls in all manner of sparkle. But then five, ten, fifteen twenty years or so thereafter I could only retain a vague generalization: I was young, helpless against the beautiful and constantly tortured by that irresistible pull of attraction. Not a single, specific memory though.

Hemingway wrote here of events thirty-plus years before, when he was young, with his first wife Hadley (s...more
Caris
I always forget just how much I like Hemingway. In my mind, he's this stark minimalist who focuses on deathly serious subject matter. This, of course, could not be much more detached from the truth. A Moveable Feast is an autobiographical work that does a decent job of introducing most of the key Lost Generation players. It's fun to watch them through Hemingway's eyes. In spite of his legend, he seemed to feel inferior a lot of the time. Bigger personalities and talents he perceived to be greate...more
Emma
In this fictionalized memoir, Ernest Hemingway tells stories from his first years in Paris as a blooming writer, spending his days writing in cafes and his nights in love with his first wife, Hadley. With Paris of the 1920’s as the backdrop, Hemingway remembers trying to make ends meet in the City of Lights. One of the Lost Generation, Hemingway tells stories of the people who mattered to him, such as Sylvia Beach and her beloved bookshop, Gertrude Stein, Ezra Pound and Scott Fitzgerald.

I bough...more
James Murphy
I've known of A Moveable Feast a long time. I was attracted, I suppose, to his prose, to his thoughts on writing, and to the idea of true sentences put on the page. The book's seductive in that way, reading his rhythms, crystal clear sentences which roll into the mind with the same regularity and gentleness as waves meeting the shore. He's telling you about Paris in the 1920s. You may not learn anything about Paris during the period, or even about Hemingway, because it's all been said before and...more
Christine
Is it literature just because Hemingway wrote it? True, his name has become synonymous with The Modern Canon, but this gossipy tell-all might give you some inroads to the real person behind the monolith of drinking and literature. And if you're too high-brow to get your rocks off on reading about the bad behavior of whatever vacuous it-girl dons the cover of Life and Style this week, maybe the juicy gaffes of F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ezra Pound, Gertrude Stein and James Joyce will take you there.

I...more
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Ernest Miller Hemingway was an American author and journalist. His economical and understated style had a strong influence on 20th-century fiction, while his life of adventure and his public image influenced later generations. Hemingway produced most of his work between the mid-1920s and the mid-1950s, and won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1954. He published seven novels, six short story collec...more
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