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Campaigning With Grant
 
by
Horace Porter
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Campaigning With Grant

4.15 of 5 stars 4.15  ·  rating details  ·  60 ratings  ·  13 reviews
In 1863 Horace Porter, then a captain, met Ulysses S. Grant as Grant commenced the campaign that would break the Confederate siege at Chattanooga. After a brief stint in Washington, Porter rejoined Grant, who was now in command of all Union forces, and served with him as a staff aide until the end of the war. Porter was at Appomattox as a brevet brigadier general, and this
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Hardcover, 560 pages
Published March 1st 1991 by BDD Promotional Books Company (first published November 1st 1985)
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Eric
A staff officer’s readable and occasionally absorbing memoir of Grant’s patient, painstaking, year-long destruction of Lee's army. Porter says “Grant’s combativeness displayed itself only to the enemy” – a remark reflected in the book’s structure, in which anecdotes of Grant’s uxoriousness, easy relations with difficult subordinates, and courtesy to hostile Southern women alternate with accounts of his predaceous cunning in the field – the feints, the bluffs, the savage pounces! Porter is the so...more
Mark
I really enjoyed this memoir of the Civil War. Horace Porter was an aide to Ulysses Grant, and his account, while almost worshipful of Grant, was highly literate and full of good stories and pacing. Porter went on to become American ambassador to France and played the key role in finding the body of Revolutionary War hero John Paul Jones, who had been buried in a pauper's grave in Paris, and getting it exhumed and transported back to the U.S.
Read1000books
Horace Porter, the author, was one of the members of Civil War Union General Ulysses S. Grant's staff, so this is, for the most part, an eyewitness account. The memoir begins in October of 1863 when Porter joins the staff, goes through the major campaigns which Grant oversaw, and concludes with the celebratory parades in Washington D.C. just after the surrender of the Confederate armies. We meet famous commanders such as Meade, Sherman, Sheridan, and Custer as well as details of battles such as...more
Joyce Lagow
This is a well (if somewhat formally) written memoir of Horace Porter, who was an aide-de-camp to Ulysses S. Grant from early 1864 to the end of the Civil War. Porter participated in all of Grant's campaigns and battles, from that of the Wilderness to Lee's surrender at Appomatox; Porter was present during the meeting of lee and Grant for the surrender. It's an eye-witness account, from the point of view of command headquarters, of the crucial last 15 months of the war. Porter gives many details...more
Kathleen
The author, Horace Porter, was on General Grant's staff during the last year plus of the Civil War. His memoirs, "Campaigning With Grant," was written after the war from his notes taken during the war. Mr. Porter in many instances relates the original dispatches written by General Grant and others. As I was reading the book, I often noticed stories I had seen in other books. I believe these later writers used Mr. Porter's memoirs as an original source. The anecdotes he relates of General Grant,...more
Monte Lamb
This is an excellent book. Horace Porter was first in his class at West Point and was on Grant's staff during the last year and half of the Civil War. He took very good notes and wrote a very clear and informative book on what happened during the time he was on Grant's staff. He had access to most decisions to see how they were made and the book has many personal anecdotes about Grant as well as President Lincoln.

This is one of the very best personal histories written about the Civil War and is...more
Chuck
Horace Porter was an aide to Grant during the Civil War, and this is his memoir of that time, originally published in the 1890's. It's pretty much a hagiography. To read it, one would think that Grant had no flaws in his person at all. For example, there is no mention of Grant's drinking. This book seems to be the source of many of the anecdotes that I've read in other authors, like Shelby Foote. If one is particularly interested in the Civil War, I would recommend this book. If not, one might f...more
Daniel
It is always fascinating to read a book written in 1897 if for nothing else than the way they wrote back then. Grant's story is one of the most compelling in American history. In essence, imagine one of the most mediocre people you knew who had not been particularly driven or successful at anything, suddenly emerging as a national hero, almost overnight. Porter does cover the period of the Virginia campaigns and also gives alot of personal insights into life in camp in those days.
Douglas Karlson
I went through a period where I only read first person memoirs of the Civil War. Horace Porter, who was an aide to General Grant through the Wilderness Campaign and on to the end of the war, is one of the best, though I still haven't read Grant's memoirs.
Chuck
Horace Porter was an aide to General Grant during the latter part of the war and provides an excellent insight into his commander's mind. It also explains how Grant got to be such a cigar smoker and how the decision was made to have Sherman march to the Sea.
Gary Baughn
Only for the Civil War nut. Porter served on Grant's staff for the last 1.5 years of Civil War, and anything else you read about Grant quotes this book. It is the original source. Takes his time but does tell some good stories.
Wayne
Horace Porter was Grant's aide during the war so he onviously is not an unbiased author. However, taking that into consideration, he does provide an illuminating and well written account of what life was like with Grant
Hanny
Oct 15, 2009 Hanny marked it as to-read  ·  review of another edition
(In Patriotic Gore, Wilson cites this as one of the first non-romantic accounts of a war, and a major source for Bernard Shaw's "Arms and the Man")
Armen Chakmakjian
This was fun although very long.
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Horace Porter served in the American Civil War and was Ulysses S. Grant's personal secretary during his presidency.

He was Ambassador of the United States to France 1897-1905.
More about Horace Porter...
Our Young Aeroplane Scouts in Germany or, Winning the Iron Cross by Horace Porter Campaigning with Grant Vol.1 Our Young Aeroplane Scouts in Germany Campaigning with Grant Vol.2 Campaigning with Ulysses S. Grant (Illustrated)

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