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The Mighty Avengers, Vol. 1: The Ultron Initiative
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The Mighty Avengers, Vol. 1: The Ultron Initiative (The Mighty Avengers #1)

3.42 of 5 stars 3.42  ·  rating details  ·  802 ratings  ·  59 reviews
The wait is over - the Mighty Avengers have assembled! They have been gathered together to be the greatest Avengers team ever, but who picked them - and why? And which A-list Avengers villain returns, revamped and reloaded for the ultimate revenge?
Paperback, 168 pages
Published September 3rd 2008 by Marvel (first published April 2nd 2007)
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Nicolo Yu
The events of Civil War split the ranks of the Avengers and formed opposing sides with warring political beliefs. With Captain America’s death, the now leaderless anti-registration heroes coalesced into a guerilla superhero squad in New Avengers. Iron Man, the face of the pro-registration camp, handpicked his own team in Mighty Avengers with Ms. Marvel as the nominal team leader. These two titles couldn’t be more different and this hardcover collected the first 11 issues of Mighty Avengers and i ...more
It was ok. The team representing the Avengers here is less than inspiring. The story itself seemed lackluster to me. Weather control? No thanks. The complete and total lack of damage control by the Avengers was interesting to me. I'm not sure if it was a conscious decision or not, but it seemed to me like an accurate reflection of the screwed up priorities Civil War gave the "official" heroes. And Bendis really needed to tone down the thought bubbles. They got distracting, and most of them were ...more
Iron Man gets to pick his own Avengers team (of heroes that were all on his side of the Civil War) and he picks Ms. Marvel to lead Wasp, Wonder Man, Black Widow, The Sentry... and Ares. It's not quite the all-star lineup the New Avengers had, but the team works. The team fights a new, Braniac-like Ultron that's causing lots of natural disasters.
The whole first issue is dedicated to selecting the team, and Iron Man/writer Brian Michael Bendis get it right. Wasp and Wonder Man get on a little t
I'm not sure how I feel about Brian Michael Bendis. I dig his dialogue, and he handles action well, but there seems to be an underlying lust for military that rubs me the wrong way, particularly when it informs characters I love, altering them in fundamental ways. Yet that seeming lust for military models makes perfect sense in the state of the contemporary Marvel Universe, reflecting as it does our own reality, so perhaps it is an unfair criticism.

Besides, whatever the reason, Bendis' engageme
Brian Poole
The Avengers franchised for the first time in years with the launch of this second ongoing series. Iron Man established a new team with Ms. Marvel as field leader and a membership comprising Wonder Man, Wasp, Black Widow, Sentry and, in a surprise choice, Ares.

The newly minted team struggled to gel as the Mole Man attacked the surface world with a horde of monsters and various natural disasters assailed the planet. That paved the way for a very different Ultron invasion that jeopardized Iron Man
Jeff Lanter
I often say how much I love Bendis, but he writes so many books that not all of them can be his best work, right? Mighty Avengers has some pretty cool ideas, but also some strange decisions. The first is the team. Ares, Carol Danvers, Wasp, Iron Man, Black Widow, Wonder Man, and The Sentry is a really odd combination of well-known and pretty obscure characters. In this first volume, Ares, Wonder Man, and the Sentry are poorly fleshed out. Ares is pretty close to a superhero cliche of someone who ...more
A team that has Iron Man, Carol Danvers, Janet van Dyne and the Black Widow in it should be enough to make me really enjoy a title. The interactions between Tony and Carol alone should have been enough to make me happy and reasonably entertain me. (With Ultron and Doom as villains this should have guaranteed four stars...)

And the action was entertaining enough, the adventures felt a bit silly and had the potential for more, but it feels that most of the opportunities were wasted. With the right
So what could make Bendis' extremely verbose storytelling even more unbearable, and yet help stretch the issues to pad a trade? It would appear that would be the return of thought balloons. Seriously, did no editor just have the moxie to stop and tell him it was overdoing it? One panel could have a character speak/think/speak/think/speak, and have it so each ballon connects to the next. Horrible idea. As for padding, I know it's a common complain amongst Bendis bashers, and it's one of the reaso ...more
After finishing Civil War, I was eager to get back into more traditional story-telling, where the heroes weren't fighting each other. I decided to start with the new Mighty Avengers, as distinct from the Avengers who are still rogues from the Registration Act, because it leads into the next Marvel crossover, Secret Invasion. Tony Stark gives Ms. Marvel clearance to put together a new team – a hand-picked team as opposed to the previous Avengers who had come together before. I like the team, but ...more
I find Brian M. Bendis to be an amazing story teller; however, I've noticed that through out the Mighty Avengers series, he places too much emphasis on the thought bubbles with his characters. It appears that after a character says anything, a thought bubble follows with what that character is really thinking. It got to be a little tedious for me. That aside, two thumbs WAY up!
Valery Tzvetanov
After the Civil War the Avengers are splitting up and we have two teams now. The “original” New Avengers are now outlaws and Iron Man is assembling a new team called the Mighty Avengers. This time he wants to select the best (from the registered superheroes). His team is total powerhouse. He has the Sentry, Wonder Man, Ares, Ms. Marvel (the new field leader), the Wasp and Black Widow. I only didn't understand what Natasha is doing in this company of mega-humans. The only logical reason is that B ...more
Like practically every other reviewer here I was left wondering one thing as I read this: What the hell is the deal with the thought bubbles? It's obviously Bendis trying to find a new way to inject humor into the conversations, but generally it falls flat. It works for pretty much only Ares. And that is because he has two kinds of thoughts: Things he is about to say and chauvinist thoughts about women.

This is a rough start and I know that I stuck with Mighty Avengers through Siege so it has to
Thought bubbles. There were thought bubbles everywhere. Slowed the story down, ruined Bendis' usually stellar pacing of dialogue and the art in the second half of the collection did little to help.

Another new Avengers team is introduced; this time assembled by Iron Man, lead by Ms. Marvel and composed mostly of pro-registration heroes (and Ares, God of War). I enjoyed the assembling of the team, even though most of the member I have little knowledge of. The fight with the new version of Ultron was well done, and showed off many of the characters abilities and personalities.

And apparently, unlike many other reviewers, the thought bubbles didn't bother me. Yes, there are a lot of them, but
Holden Attradies
With the new Avengers becoming "outlaws" and the tone of that series becoming more street level and gritty I find that the addition of The Mighty Avengers being almost the total opposite of that a great addition to the Marvel Universe. Like I said, New Avengers became gritty and centered more on street level crime and the underworld lead by the Hood. Mighty Avengers is much more colorful and centered MUCH more on big overblown world threats. The characters are all colorful ones, both in personal ...more
Following the events of Civil War, Brian Michael Bendis assembles yet another Iron Man assembles his own, pro-registration team of Avengers. Because as we all know there's enough former Avengers members out there to make at least 5 more teams, and people really can't wait to read about their adventures. NOT!

Anyway, back to the review of this new series' first story arc: The Mole Man must've taken a wrong turn in one of his dark tunnels because he ends up fighting the Avengers instead of his trad
I could picture the Avengers sitting around a conference table while Jarvis serves tea, and Janet looking up and saying, "Okay, folks, we're stuck in this stupid post-Civil War storyline, now what do we do?" Oh well... The new line-up is not bad, though a couple of characters were obviously chosen to be weak-links just to advance the plot. Carol Danvers does pretty well as team-leader, and her obvious friction with Tony is well portrayed, though why she chooses to fight in a black leather thong ...more
A lot has happened in the world protected by the Avengers, prior to this series being introduced. Without going through the full back story, this comic offers plenty of witty repartee, great action and an eclectic array of characters ("we need a Wolverine/Thor character"...cue Artemis, God of War - or "Thor Lite" as he is irreverently described at one point...) I probably won't rush out to buy the full series but with Bendis on board, it will be a run I will follow with great interest.
What were they thinking with this one? Apparently that we wanted to know what every character was thinking at all times. I've not seen so many unnecessary thought balloons in a long time. Also this is a weird team, including Wonder Man, Ares, and Sentry; a very D-list grouping. Also we get a sexy half-naked, silvery, Wasp lookalike version of Ultron. Frank Cho's typically curvy art is a stand out here. While nowhere near great, this one is goofy enough to be entertaining.
The Mighty Avengers are a team of supposed "A-listers" chosen by Tony Stark and Carol Danvers in the wake of the Civil War as the officially sanctioned team. It's the first group that did not come together by fate like Cap always liked, a deliberate distinction in leadership. Overall, I felt like the team didn't have a lot of chemistry. I'm not a fan of Ares, or "Thor-Lite" as Pym thought sarcastically to himself. Sentry has never felt fully fleshed out to me. One interesting dynamic is there's ...more
2nd Reading, Feb '13: I'm still hovering between a 3 and a 4 for this one. There are a few things I love: the characterizations are excellent. Ares, in particular--how could you not love his brash, out-of-touch idiocy by the end of this story. How can a character I know nothing about suddenly become my favorite Avenger?) Cho's art is gorgeous, and the color work accents it perfectly. The plot is solid but not quite revolutionary, and there are some things I'd like explained, but it certainly isn ...more
My Brief Bookshelf Overview: awkward-or-cheesy-writing, exciting-premise, hell-of-a-ride, playful, story-not-intriguing-enough, top-notch-artwork, unrealized-potential

Additional Notes: This collection contains The Mighty Avengers issues #1-6.

Felt vapid and uninspired. Just another one of Bendis' flops.
OK, if it weren`t for the great Frank Cho art in the first half of this book, it would hardly qualify for more than 2 stars.

The stories are pretty juvenile, and the team consists of characters that coud hardly hold their own book - Iron Man gets taken out of the story pretty early on and the team consists of third-tiered characters.

It is one action-packed page after another, but at a certain point you just wanna say slow down why-don`t-cha.

As for the art, it does start out nice with greast Frank
This title isn't bad, but pales in comparison to New Avengers. It seems like an apology from Bendis to all the fans he angered by "ruining" the Avengers and making them... oh, I don't know... interesting and relevant. It's wall to wall action, infused with a fun, old-school superhero vibe. I prefer the more street-level characters to the heavy hitters on this team, but I can see how this would appeal to a lifelong Avengers reader turned off by recent events. Frank Cho's art, while terminally lat ...more
After the Civil War, Iron Man wants to create a team of Avengers that is the best of the best. Unfortuantly their first bad guy is Ultron who is incrediably hard to kill. This is a good introductory book, quite fun, and the team has some interesting dynamics. A good read.
After all the bad reveiws I had read about the Marvel Universe and the "Civil War" I was currious to see if what I had read was true - that the writers and editers at Marvel had gone crazy and were publishing crap. Frankly what I had read of recent Marvel comics supported the idea that comic books no longer had to be even to the level of bad. The new Tony Stark / Iron Man running the world thing is stupid.

I was happy to be wrong about this story line. I was very suprised that I actually liked th
Not exactly a preview of the "Age of Ultron" film, but an interesting alternate take on a similar story. Tony Stark's hubris unleashes a misguided AI against an unsuspecting world. A B-Team of Avengers bickers while they try to stop it.
This was a fun bit of Avengers craziness. Lots of action and a decent story to keep it moving. I'm not a big fan of Ares or Sentry (I like the classic Avengers lineups) but at least their additions to the team are explained in the story. The art is great, and though Matt Fraction's stories tend toward what I call "one panel adventures" and "one panel battles" (no good fight ever goes more than a page or two, unfortunately) he keeps the story moving and the dialogue crisp. Like many readers, I ha ...more
Carles Muñoz Miralles
Decepcionante inicio de la colección, con un grupo que hace aguas por todas partes, que no sabe encontrar su química y un villano (Ultrón) que lejos de parecer temible resulta un poco patético. El dibujo, eso sí, genial.
Mighty avengers are not lacking any might with Ares, ms marvel, and wonder man. Although the story is not very deep it is entertaining. Bendis does a good job just not his best.
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A comic book writer and erstwhile artist. He has won critical acclaim (including five Eisner Awards) and is one of the most successful writers working in mainstream comics. For over eight years Bendis’s books have consistently sat in the top five best sellers on the nationwide comic and graphic novel sales charts.

Though he started as a writer and artist of independent noir fiction series, he shot
More about Brian Michael Bendis...

Other Books in the Series

The Mighty Avengers (7 books)
  • The Mighty Avengers, Vol. 2: Venom Bomb
  • The Mighty Avengers, Vol. 3: Secret Invasion, Vol. 1
  • The Mighty Avengers, Vol. 4: Secret Invasion, Vol. 2
  • The Mighty Avengers, Vol. 5: Earth's Mightiest
  • The Mighty Avengers, Vol. 6: The Unspoken
  • The Mighty Avengers, Vol. 7: Siege

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