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Alan Sillitoe
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Saturday Night And Sunday Morning (The Seaton Novels)

3.83  ·  Rating Details ·  2,467 Ratings  ·  137 Reviews
Alan Sillitoe’s bestselling debut novel about debauchery, infidelity... and the morning after

Arthur Seaton, a ladies’ man and factory-worker extraordinaire, has just downed seven gins and eleven pints at his local pub. Thoroughly smashed, he proceeds to tumble down an entire flight of stairs, pass out, and wake up again only to vomit on a middle-aged couple. Luckily Arth
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Published (first published 1958)
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Ian B A kind of Loving - also about an 'angry young man'.
Man at the Top - about an ambitious, and not a very nice, young man who sees his life as getting…more
A kind of Loving - also about an 'angry young man'.
Man at the Top - about an ambitious, and not a very nice, young man who sees his life as getting on, no matter who you tread on!! A really good book.(less)
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(showing 1-30 of 3,000)
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Tfitoby
Aug 20, 2012 Tfitoby rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: lit
"Don't let the bastards get you down" - Arthur Seaton
“For it was Saturday night, the best and bingiest glad-time of the week, one of the fifty-two holidays in the slow-turning Big Wheel of the year, a violent preamble to a prostrate Sabbath. Piled up passions were exploded on Saturday night, and the effect of a week's monotonous graft in the factory was swilled out of your system in a burst of goodwill. You followed the motto of 'be drunk and be happy,' kept your crafty arms around female waist
...more
Vit Babenco
Aug 20, 2016 Vit Babenco rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
“For it was Saturday night, the best and bingiest glad-time of the week, one of the fifty-two holidays in the slow-turning Big Wheel of the year, a violent preamble to a prostrate Sabbath. Piled-up passions were exploded on Saturday night, and the effect of a week’s monotonous graft in the factory was swilled out of your system in a burst of goodwill. You followed the motto of ‘be drunk and be happy’, kept your crafty arms around female waists, and felt the beer going beneficially down into the ...more
·Karen·
Aug 10, 2010 ·Karen· rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Reckless, brash Arthur Seaton could see off any of today's binge-drinking chancers, it takes seven gins and eleven pints to floor him, but he still gets up for more. At twenty two he's the king of his little world, refusing to let anyone impose their laws on him. 'Don't let the bastards get you down' is his motto, and the 'bastards' are anyone who tries to stop him doing exactly what he wants. At some stage or other his life begins to spin out of control, he is on a helter-skelter that will deli ...more
Jakey Gee
Mar 28, 2012 Jakey Gee rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Interesting, and I can see why it was so subversive and necessary (extra-marital shagging, boozing, deeply unpatriotic about the war and about National Service, etc) - but really not what I expected. I thought it was going to be a 'kitchen sink' socialist piece about hardship and hope, in the spirit of Love on the Dole. It isn't: it's almost proto-Thatcherite or proto-punk, even. Arthur ain't no socialist: he hates paying taxes, hates unions (as well as employers), wants to blow stuff up and lov ...more
Riley
Aug 07, 2011 Riley rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This book is a good chronicle of the despair of young working-class England after World War II, but it is also ultimately surprisingly optimistic. Here was one passages I highlighted as emblematic of the main character's bitterness:

"What did they take up for? Bloody fools, but one of these days they'd be wrong. They think they've settled our hashes with their insurance cards and television sets, but I'll be one of them to turn round on 'em and let them see how wrong they are. When I'm on my fift
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John
Feb 08, 2016 John rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
First published in 1958 my edition is the 50th anniversary one. It is set in the years immediately following the second world war, in a working class community which has now largely disappeared. Its central character is Arthur, a 20 year old Lothario who works and plays hard. There's lots to dislike about him: he is a cheat, with a cuckoo's preference for the marital nests of others. But he is a real professional who seduces the reader along with the rest. He should get caught of course?...

I en
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Matti Karjalainen
Vuonna 1958 ilmestynyt Alan Sillitoen esikoisteos "Lauantai-illasta sunnuntaiaamuun" (Otava, 1962) kuvaa 24-vuotiaan Arthur Seatonin elämää ja ajatusmaailmaa Nottinghamissa. Hän työskentelee päivät tehtaassa ja viettää yöt ryypäten tai varattujen naisten vuoteissa.

Nuori ja vihainen mies ei usko sen enempää politiikkoihin, luokkayhteiskuntaan, armeijaan kuin ammattiyhdistysliikkeeseenkään, vaikka työväenluokkaan kuuluukin - hän ei oikeastaan yhtään mihinkään muuhun kuin itseensä. Joku toinen Good
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Terri
This is a hard one to rate. It definitely evokes a time and a place. Arthur is frustrating, and appealing--despite his many shortcomings. Sometimes he's infuriating. Reading this book, I was reminded of Rabbit Run, which I hated. This book isn't nearly as sour as that one. Now and then Sillitoe includes a beautiful, perfect little description. In the thick of the book, I felt like the story got slightly mired and slightly repetitive--like maybe 20 pages could have been sliced off somewhere in th ...more
Nicola Mansfield
This is sort of the British equivalent of the depressing Irish novels. I like those Irish books better. Obviously somewhat biographical this short novel takes a couple of years in the life of young 21yo Arthur Seaton. The majority of the book contains Part 1 Saturday Night and tells of Arthur's life as a man about the neighbourhood. He works in a bicycle factory; is good at his job and gets paid well, spending his money on classy clothes. He's a drunk and a ladies man. Most of the action takes p ...more
Owain Lewis
Nov 14, 2012 Owain Lewis rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This was a cracker. A bona fide work of blue-collar existentialism, full of unrefined rebellion and working class whit. I generally don't go for this kind of stuff - English novels about the working classes always make me feel a tad claustrophobic and/or depressed - but this had a real and palpable energy to it. Yes, it does have the slightly ragged feel of a first novel but that's part of what makes it great.
Marija
Apr 18, 2016 Marija rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Modern readers may probably readily associate Alan Sillitoe’s 1958 novel with the 1960 film starring Albert Finney. Interestingly, both novel and film are notable contributions to British literature and film. Saturday Night and Sunday Morning is categorized as being part of the Angry Young Men movement of the 1950s-early 1960s; the movement which also spilled into filmmaking with the British New Wave—those black and white “mod” films filled with real locations and real people, in essence challen ...more
Joe Stamber
Apr 06, 2011 Joe Stamber rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: read-2000s
Wondeful illustration of northern working class life in the 1950s, as we follow the adventures of a young man who spends his days working in a factory and his free time drinking, living it up, or recovering. AS writes with dark humour in this gritty tale. It's worth looking beyond modern fiction to discover treasures like this.
Sandra
Mar 28, 2016 Sandra rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: read-2016
Brimming with an honesty and energy which must have been a breath of mind-blowing fresh air when it first appeared in 1958, and not in the slightest dated now. A thoroughly absorbing tale and an opportunity to revisit a time when I was observing and aiming to absorb such attitudes.
Jared
Feb 18, 2008 Jared rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: novels
Black and Tan swillin' blokes is where it's at! gin-soaked abortions and falling down the stairs at the Publick? Yes, please!
Tash Berbank
Feb 13, 2015 Tash Berbank rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Don't let the bastards grind you down.
McNatty
Jul 15, 2013 McNatty rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Sillitoe captures the life of a 24 year old perfectly here. Living day by day, working to pay for his drinks on Friday night, hanging out with his mates and chasing birds. Its easy come easy go for Arthur and I remember feeling like that. Arthur is bullet proof and goes against all the rules and conventions of the day. He's not angry he just doesn't want to be told what to do and doesn't want to be cornered. I think Sillitoe has a real knack of writing about the working class and I remember feel ...more
Mel
May 17, 2010 Mel rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition

Some great phrases that speak to the truisms of the working man's life: "For it was Saturday night, the best and bingiest glad-time of the week, one of the fifty-two holidays in the slow-turning Big Wheel of the year, a violent preamble to a prostrate Sabbath. Piled up passions were exploded on Saturday night, and the effect of a week's monotonous graft in the factory was swilled out of your system in a burst of goodwill. You followed the motto of 'be drunk and be happy,' kept your crafty arms a
...more
Simon
May 08, 2016 Simon rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Whatever happened to these people? The unskilled young man on the make. The world was full of them when I was a boy but now they're gone. A reminder that the world may have changed as significantly during our lifetimes as it did before we were around. (I was born about a month after it was published). Yet strangely still relevant.

A cracking read and like all Nottingham writers Sillitoe gives us a detailed tour of the city and surrounds. You could draw maps from these novels.
Fianna Dalton
Dec 18, 2014 Fianna Dalton rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: a-list
wow Artic Monkeys 'Whatever people say I am, that's what I'm not' is based on 'Saturday night and sunday morning'. this is a nice dimension to my favourite AM album, awesome book too. It's the best thing I've read in the Angry young men genre! ...more
Mandy
Mar 19, 2016 Mandy rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
One of the greatest novels of working class life ever, Alan Sillitoe’s best novel packs as much of a punch today as it did when first published in 1958. It’s the story of young Nottingham factory worker Arthur Seaton, who works hard and plays hard and is determined not to be beaten down by “the system”. But when he gets involved with a married woman his life is complicated in ways he could never have envisaged, and his hedonistic lifestyle is curtailed. It’s a vivid and authentic portrayal of 19 ...more
Jade Moore
Feb 03, 2015 Jade Moore rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Being a resident of the city of Nottingham, I really loved reading this book and being familiar with the places that the main character,Arthur, travels to. As a general thing, I like to read a book before watching any film version of it, but with this, I had seen the film a while ago, due to media/film studies. So I had the film in mind as I read, but the book gave me more out of it. Overall I enjoyed the character of Arthur, his outlook on working life, women, marriage etc. He is very memorable ...more
Lahierbaroja
Oct 09, 2015 Lahierbaroja rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Lo tuve que dejar a medias, me resultó pesado.
Stephanie Griffin
Pretty good for a first novel. Unlikeable character lives by his own rules until suddenly he doesn't. The problem is that we don't get inside his head enough to understand his conversion.
Kent Miller
May 29, 2016 Kent Miller marked it as to-read  ·  review of another edition

Alan Sillitoe’s bestselling debut novel about debauchery, infidelity... and the morning after


Arthur Seaton, a ladies’ man and factory-worker extraordinaire, has just downed seven gins and eleven pints at his local pub. Thoroughly smashed, he proceeds to tumble down an entire flight of stairs, pass out, and wake up again only to vomit on a middle-aged couple. Luckily Arthur’s lover, Brenda—a married woman with two kids—lets Arthur escape to her bed. Such are Saturdays in this bachelor’s life. Wh

...more
Piperitapitta
Forse alla fine mi piaciuta di pi l'idea del romanzo che non il romanzo in s.
Trovo molto bella la similitudine che Sillitoe sceglie per rappresentare la vita di Arthur, giovane inglese poco pi che ventenne della Nottingham del secondo dopoguerra, la cui vita si divide tra il lavoro in fabbrica, pi di un paio di birre al pub e qualche relazione sentimentale pi o meno impegnativa; il sabato sera, quello che Arthur aspetta ogni settimana per divertirsi, diventa per Sillitoe il simbolo della giovin
...more
Piperitapitta
Forse alla fine mi piaciuta di pi l'idea del romanzo che non il romanzo in s.
Trovo molto bella la similitudine che Sillitoe sceglie per rappresentare la vita di Arthur, giovane inglese poco pi che ventenne della Nottingham del secondo dopoguerra, la cui vita si divide tra il lavoro in fabbrica, pi di un paio di birre al pub e qualche relazione sentimentale pi o meno impegnativa; il sabato sera, quello che Arthur aspetta ogni settimana per divertirsi, diventa per Sillitoe il simbolo della giovin
...more
Mark Speed
One of these novels I always felt ignorant for not having read.

The life and times of a genuine working-class lad working in a factory in Nottingham, this caused a stir when it was published. The literary establishment was so up its own tail-end that they had no grasp of what real life was like for 80% of the population.

When I was a lad I worked a manual labour job in Northumbria. The lads were mostly from the small villages up the Tyne valley. And this really is a good account of what life was s
...more
Louise
Apr 17, 2014 Louise rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Another book club read which I wouldn't have necessarily come to on my own. I remember hearing about it on BBC Radio 4 last year when they did a British New Wave season but never heard their dramatisation, which is a shame as it no longer seems to be available to "Listen Again" on the website and I would like to hear it now.

Saturday Night & Sunday Morning follows a year or so in the life of Arthur Seaton. Arthur works all day (except for the odd occasion when he stays home "feeling badly") a
...more
Dave Biggus
Feb 26, 2016 Dave Biggus rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
"Born for trouble? Not me. If you want to know summat, I've had a peaceful life. I never did like trouble, or doing people harm. It upsets me too much, like boozing. Only sometimes I can't keep off it. Hold your skirt down, duck, or I'll see all you've got."

I really enjoyed this short read about a young rabble-rouser working in a factory in post-war England. Think "East of Eden" but in Nottingham. Boy can Arthur drink, often a stumble-down drunk, in and out of pubs and the arms of married women.
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Jo
Arthur Seaton works in a factory, goes out drinking at the weekend and sleeps with other men's wives. It's postwar Britain and the working classes have a better life than they did before; work is plentiful, the money is good and the unions look after them. This is a working class novel about working class lives and written in the Nottinghamshire dialect. Inspired by Sillitoe's own experiences, this is a slice of real life masquerading as fiction.
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Alan Sillitoe was an English writer, one of the "Angry Young Men" of the 1950s (although he, in common with most of the other writers to whom the label was applied, had never welcomed it).
For more see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Sil...
More about Alan Sillitoe...

Other Books in the Series

The Seaton Novels (4 books)
  • The Open Door
  • Key To The Door
  • Birthday

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“I'm me and nobody else; and whatever people think I am or say I am, that's what I'm not, because they don't know a bloody thing about me.” 27 likes
“All I'm out for is a good time - all the rest is propaganda.” 22 likes
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