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The Second Scientific American Book of Mathematical Puzzles and Diversions
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The Second Scientific American Book of Mathematical Puzzles and Diversions

4.25 of 5 stars 4.25  ·  rating details  ·  76 ratings  ·  2 reviews
This delightful collection from the magician of math introduces readers to magic squares, the Generalized Ham Sandwich Theorem, origami, digital roots, an update of the Induction Game of Eleusis, Dudeney puzzles, the maze at Hampton Court palace, and many more mathematical puzzles and principles.

"Gardner is often the clown prince of science. . . . His Mathematical Games c
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Paperback, 256 pages
Published August 15th 1987 by University Of Chicago Press (first published January 28th 1901)
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Jim Razinha
More topography, but also more fun diversions. The chapters came from columns he wrote in the late 1950s and it's funny what a generation later turned out: back then, the only other popular die than the standard six-sided cube was an octohedron (he was talking about Platonic solids). The 1970s introduced the world to Dungeons and Dragons and the eventual standardization of D20 games. Dice packs still come in the five Platonic solids. I remember playing Bridge-it a lot at a friend's house and lov ...more
Mike
Excellent, as always!
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Martin Gardner was an American mathematics and science writer specializing in recreational mathematics, but with interests encompassing micromagic, stage magic, literature (especially the writings of Lewis Carroll), philosophy, scientific skepticism, and religion. He wrote the Mathematical Games column in Scientific American from 1956 to 1981, and published over 70 books.
More about Martin Gardner...
Fads and Fallacies in the Name of Science The Colossal Book of Mathematics Aha! Gotcha: Paradoxes to Puzzle & Delight (Tools for Transformation) My Best Mathematical and Logic Puzzles Did Adam and Eve Have Navels?

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