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How to Write the History of the New World: Histories, Epistemologies, and Identities in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World
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How to Write the History of the New World: Histories, Epistemologies, and Identities in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World

3.69 of 5 stars 3.69  ·  rating details  ·  26 ratings  ·  3 reviews
In the mid-eighteenth century, the French naturalist Buffon contended that the New World was in fact geologically new—that it had recently emerged from the waters—and that dangerous miasmas had caused all organic life on the continents to degenerate. In the “dispute of the New World” many historians, naturalists, and moral philosophers from Europe and the Americas (includi ...more
Paperback, 488 pages
Published April 16th 2002 by Stanford University Press (first published April 16th 2001)
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Ess Kay
In the sixteenth century, Spain was treated as a liminal European entity, an humilis civitatum on the world stage, lagging behind the perceived intellectual prowess of the French and the English, yet somehow a major player on the world stage, conquering and exploiting the New World. It is unsurprising that when historical reports of the Amerindians began to circulate in Europe, that their authority was questioned by the larger Northern European intellectual community; without their direct intera ...more
Romina
Honest Review: Did not dig it. If you are interested in intellectual battles about epistemology by privileged dudes, this is for you.

My academic review:
In How to Write the History of the New World, Jorge Cañizares-Esguerra argues that Spanish scholars during the 18th century constructed an epistemology for writing history that matched Anglo-Germanic methods of the 19th century. According to Cañizares-Esguerra, the historiographical content that was debated throughout the 1700s about how to write
...more
Lauren
This was a textbook for an Atlantic History graduate course, and while it was quite thick tome to read in the alloted amount of time (3 days?) it was fascinating. Going far beyond the general accounts of the Europeans coming to the New World, the book focused on court cases and a large amount of archival material to reconstruct a more comprehensive look at the New World (broadly defining South America, the Caribbean, and North America) in the 1700s.
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