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La Isla Mágica: Un Vi...
 
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William B. Seabrook
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La Isla Mágica: Un Viaje Al Corazón Del Vudú

3.67  ·  Rating Details  ·  58 Ratings  ·  10 Reviews
1929. The author's West Indian mail boat lay at anchor in a tropical green gulf. At the water's edge, lit by sunset, sprawled the town of Cap Haitien. Among the modern structures were the wrecked mansions of the 16th century French colonials who imported slaves from Africa and made Haiti the richest colony in the western hemisphere. In the ruins was the palace built for Pa ...more
Published (first published January 1st 1929)
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Malini Sridharan
The Magic Island supposedly introduced the zombie to the west, which is why I decided to read it.

The early zombie flicks definitely reflect the racial tension and American paternalism of Seabrook's travelogue. There is weird mix of disregard and respect for Haitians in his tone. The illustrations are horribly racist, so much so that I had to fold the pages because I felt really gross for looking at them. Seabrook supports the idea of overall white superiority and condescends to black Haitians.
...more
ein Leichter
Unlike vampire movies, which can all be said to owe their existence to the novel Dracula, there never was one major zombie novel. However, this book was very influential, and inspired many early zombie films, such as White Zombie (starring Bela Lugosi). Exactly how accurate the book is, is a separate issue.
cs
Nov 13, 2014 cs rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I found this book at a library book sale and was delighted to read about the author's descriptions of a little-written-about part of the world during the 1920s. I wouldn't judge it on it's "political correctness" as the term didn't even exist in the 1920's (did it??). What's fascinating is the idea that this book introduced the concept of zombies to western culture! Think about that next time you watch Walking Dead. The author himself was a fascinatingly bizarre character who tragically ended up ...more
Aaron Meyer
Nov 18, 2010 Aaron Meyer rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: occult
This is a really good book if you are in to travel literature type stuff. The book covers a long trip to Haiti by Mr. Seabrook and his various adventures upon the island. In the first part of the book you get alot of good first had account of voodoo rituals and songs. In the second major part of the book you get the rest of his adventures throughout the island with a variety of people American and Haitian with stories which cover politics, history, and just everyday life. Nothing in the book is ...more
Aaron the Pink Donut
I have read a number of editions of this book. This edition doesn’t have the photos (quite interesting) or the horrifically racist illustrations of the late 20’s and early 30’s editions. The book has also has been reprinted a number of times under several different titles (jungle magic..Etc). The major flaw with this book is the inherently racist slate and its leanings on the sensational. A great read but take the anthropology information with a grain of salt. This is not a definitive text or ev ...more
Aaron the Pink Donut
I have read a number of editions of this book. This edition doesn’t have the photos (quite interesting) or the horrifically racist illustrations of the late 20’s and early 30’s editions. The book has also has been reprinted a number of times under several different titles (jungle magic..Etc). The major flaw with this book is the inherently racist slate and its leanings on the sensational. A great read but take the anthropology information with a grain of salt. This is not a definitive text or ev ...more
Alexandra
An enjoyable and engaging read about Haiti in the 1920's. Some of the essays are more realistic, some sensationalistic, calling into question the reliability of the account, despite the author's repeated claims that they are true. Less sensationalistic than many other books on Voudou. Contains exciting travel, political and adventure writing. Seabrook veers far off the political correctness trail, but it could have been much worse for 1929. Appalling illustrations.
Marcy Reiz
Nov 18, 2009 Marcy Reiz marked it as to-read  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: books-i-own
I have the 1929 edition of this book (recently acquired...it was my great-grandfather's) and it definitely has some very interesting illustrations.. can't wait to read it
Purple Iris
Nov 25, 2010 Purple Iris marked it as to-read  ·  review of another edition
I am not looking forward to reading this, but probably should as I begin the whole revision process. I'm sure there will be a review!
Randy
Jul 08, 2008 Randy is currently reading it  ·  review of another edition
Seabrook introduces a new word to the English language: "zombie".
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William Buehler Seabrook was a journalist and explorer whose interest in the occult lead him across the globe where he studied magic rituals, trained as a witch doctor, and famously ate human flesh, likening it to veal. Despite his studious accounts of magical practices, he insisted he had never seen anything which could not be explained rationally.

His book on witchcraft is notable for its thought
...more
More about William B. Seabrook...

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