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Exiles
 
by
James Joyce
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Exiles

3.34 of 5 stars 3.34  ·  rating details  ·  644 ratings  ·  35 reviews
Exile was James Joyce's only play. Written in 1916 after "A Portrait of an Artist as a Young Man" and before "Ulysses", it is seen by Padraic Colum in his introduction to this edition as a kind of watershed between the work he had done and the work he was to do.
W. B. Yeats turned down "Exiles" for the Abbey theatre and the play received its first major London performance i...more
Paperback, 160 pages
Published October 27th 1973 by Penguin Books Ltd. (first published 1918)
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Simon Mcleish
Originally published on my blog here in May 2001.

Of all Joyce's mature writing, his only play is probably the least well known. It is also one of his least successful pieces, never having had much success on the stage. Displaying an unusual lack of confidence, it shows its influences strongly.

The Exiles manages to simultaneously be dull enough to seem longer than it is and unsatisfying enough to seem shorter. This is because Joyce gives all the real character to the part of Richard; neither he n...more
Yair Bezalel
I was going to start this with a 'Joyce is to English and world literature what x is to y...' but, I'll go one better and just say that Joyce just IS literature. The man embodied so much of what's great and horrible about writers, about the craft, about the simplicity of telling a story versus the herculean nonsense that is the extracting of meaning, new, old, completely invented or absolute truth, from that writing. Joyce was brilliant and revolutionary. He completely shifted the course of Engl...more
John
I'm not a fan of Joyce, which probably explains why I really liked this play. Exiles is much more straightforward than any of his novels, and far more dramatic and interesting than any of the short stories in The Dubliners. I decided to give it a try after hearing that it was by far his most "conventional" work, a term which appeals to me in respect to authors like James Joyce and William Faulkner. If you like stories where you have to wrestle with every sentence in order to appreciate their sub...more
Reza
نمایشنامه تبعیدی ها: جیمز جویس
شخصيت ها
ريچارد روان: نويسنده
برتا: همسر ریچارد
آرچي: پسر آنها، هشت ساله
رابرت هَند: روزنامه نگار
بئاتريس جاستيس: دختر دايي رابرت، معلم موسيقي
بريجيد: خدمتكار مسن خانواده روان
يك زن ماهي فروش
جیمز آگوستین آلوی ژیوس جویس، مشهور به جیمز جویس در ۲ فوریه ( ۱۳ بهمن) ۱۸۸۲ در دوبلین پایتخت ایرلند چشم به جهان گشود. وی در ۱۳ ژانویه ۱۹۴۱ در حالی که از درد چشم و فقر و بیماری رنج می برد، در زوریخ چشم از جهان فروبست.
سیر روایی نمایشنامه :
ریچارد که خود را به تبعیدی خود خواسته وا داشته است...more
Ivana
I feel this play could have been better but I cannot define precisely how. I cannot picture it on stage, but that does not bother me, I've loved many "only to read" plays. Perhaps with some editing and rewriting Exiles could have been really great. ( Here I go with the maybes: If it had been a great success would it have been edited and improved? Ah, questions, questions) It has the potential without doubt, it has some wonderful dialogues but I feel something is missing. It may be that Joyce's t...more
Baiocco
Do you have to read Ulysses? No. But you shouldn't be scared of it either. Just jump right in and quit being a pussy. Joyce was an Aquarius and if the fruit of his labor was Ulysses than it is genuinely the work of the Water Bearer: it just keeps giving, giving, giving to parched lips. Don't expect anything from it and you'll be rewarded 10 fold. But don't try to quantify it either, because it was designed to reject that kind of thinking--a truly unique spirit. There is a lot going on in there,...more
H
Oct 29, 2009 H added it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: drama
"I have wounded my soul for you -- a deep wound of doubt which can never be healed. I can never know, never in this world. I do not wish to know or to believe. I do not care. It is not in the darkness of belief that I desire you. But in restless living wounding doubt. To hold you by no bonds, even of love, to be united with you in body and soul in utter nakedness -- for this I longed. And now I am tired for a while, Bertha. My wound tires me."
Frederick
Jan 15, 2008 Frederick rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Actors
Shelves: plays, joyce
I am recommending this for two reasons.
The first is that the introduction is by Conor McPherson, a playwright whose works (among them THE SEAFARER, which is currently on Broadway) take a cue from Joyce and Yeats.
The second reason is that this volume contains a twelve-page set of notes by Joyce himself.
It's handy to have EXILES by itself. I've only noticed it previously contained in THE PORTABLE JOYCE, which, I think, has gone out of print. [It hasn't. It's even been corrected to show dashes ins...more
Jenny
Jag kan förstå de kritiker som hävdar att Exiles är Joyces mest misslyckade verk. Pjäsen jämförs med Ibsen och, till viss del, kan jag hålla med om det. Exiles har onekligen en likartad utformning men saknar Ibsens anspel på människans inre liv. Pjäsen har även jämförts med Joyces egna verk och man menar med detta att den saknar mycket av hans riklighet, bredd och förtrollning. Det är jättetrist men jag kan inget annat än att hålla med. Exiles är en intressant pjäs, naturalismen var en mycket sp...more
Cody
Not entirely coherent. The dynamic of the two couples unbalanced, and Richard takes center stage. Unfortunately, we relate more to the intuitiveness of his wife, Bertha, than we do in any way to him. She spends the majority of the play dutifully following his wishes, though she finally reveals her own personal thoughts on the last few pages--similar to Molly Bloom in "Ulysses"--and leaves the reader with a somewhat satisfactory conclusion, but you still wish she'd spoken up much earlier. The pie...more
§--
Disclaimer: I hate Ibsen.

Tedious. Please. No one make me read this again. Please. Please.

How could someone make such a juicy soap-opera-type story so boring? There were a couple of good lines, but even Joyce's notes on Exiles in the back are a bunch of nonsense. It's too bad he didn't make this into a novel; it might've been good.

Has he ever heard of editing? Of cutting? I mean, I like Eugene O'Neill--he overwrites. This makes O'Neill look like Beckett. Except if Beckett sucked. It's hard to fi...more
Jason Fritz
Stylistically, Exiles is very different from any of Joyce's novels, but the themes are not. Its ties to Ulysses are most apparent: Richard/Stephen and Robert/Bloom, renunciation, humiliation, physical depravity, etc. This particularly true of the Richard-Stephen-Hamlet relationship.

The exacting setting of the acts by the author cause the play to read almost like a novel, but not a Joyce novel. He rarely played with words as he did in his other works. There characters are (naturally) not develop...more
Wes
Although this play draws upon 'The Dead,' I felt that Exiles had far less of an emotional impact than the stories in Dubliners, in general. I only gradually developed a mental picture of the set and the characters, which I could finally visualize by about halfway through the Second Act; I'd really love to see the work performed.
Maria
Señor que empuja a su mujer a ponerle los cuernos con su mejor amigo, porque dice que no quiere coartar su libertad. Ella parece que sólo quiere hacerle feliz a él y no sabe qué hacer, es como un pelele entre los dos hombres. Al mejor-amigo, que siempre ha estado enamorado de la mujer, le corta bastante el rollo que el otro le de su consentimiento tan superior y tranquilo. Al final nadie es feliz.
Michael
Exiles is worth reading, if you happen to be a James Joyce devotee, but it catches one offguard: written between Portrait and Ulysses, it has none of the stylistic innovation. In fact, it is very plain, perhaps to the point of making it not interesting. But, upon further reflection, it is not bad, so much as different from those grand brackets.
i!
The shameless work of an unabashed fanboy. Made all the worse by Joyce's notes at the end, in which the author backs up his godawful, wooden, overwrought play with arguments from the work of every Western philosopher since Thales.
Omar Shamsi
One of Joyce's least favored works, Exiles is a story of a love triangle and the cat and mouse games that are born of that and the people that were, in fact, exiled on various different occasions. A good work, if not the best.
Cody
It is interesting to see Joyce work within the confines of playwriting, but I found this text inferior to the rest of his body of work. To see Joyce in superior playwright form, seek out the "Circe" episode in *Ulysses.*
Garrett Cash
I'm not a huge fan of Ibsen, I'm even more so not a fan of really bad imitations of him. This play was groan-inducing.
Everett Darling
A decent play in its own right, though apparently a nod to Ibsen and with that in mind, it doesn´t stand close to that kind of genius for capturing life´s simple and complex circumstances.
Greg
After reading Ulysses, this was a calm reading from James Joyce. The story is compelling and the impact from the characters is resounding. A great play by a great author.
Martin
Fairly simplistic concept and limited overall, but definitely enjoyable and good for avid readers od Joyce. Links in well with stories from 'Dubliners' especially.
David
Much of James Joyce's literature is based on his own life and/or memories of his life in Ireland while he "self imposed exile" on himself, living in Paris or Trieste.
Jacob
Aug 15, 2007 Jacob rated it 2 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: completists
With Exiles, Joyce worked out his debt to Ibsen by writing an awful play. Read the fiction; this is not of interest to anyone but students and scholars of Joyce.
Emily
I really liked this short "play" by Joyce. It's his easiest read. While the play is unstageable, it's a good story, and the dialogue is well done.
Jackee
I really enjoyed the play, even though it was really different from the other Joyce writings I've read.
Caroline
got a rare book edition from my brother for my birthday, Joyce always good
Soodaroo
Too idealist, too much good for thinking . . . or Mr. Joyce own life?
david blumenshine
no surprise joyce didn't make it writing plays. gah
Nicolas Brannon
He imitates Ibsen. Just read Ibsen instead.
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Librarian Note: There is more than one author in the Goodreads database with this name. See this thread for more information.

James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish novelist, noted for his experimental use of language in such works as Ulysses (1922) and Finnegans Wake (1939). Joyce's technical innovations in the art of the novel include an extensive use of interior monologue; he used a complex network of s...more
More about James Joyce...
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man Ulysses Dubliners The Dead Finnegans Wake

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