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Last Poems

4.15  ·  Rating Details ·  67 Ratings  ·  8 Reviews
English poet and scholar, whose verse would influence later poets, although only two slim volumes appeared during his lifetime, this being one of them. Partial Contents: Beyond the moor and mountain crest; Her strong enchantments failing; In valleys green and still; Could man be drunk for ever; The night my father got me; The sigh that heaves the grasses; Onward led the ...more
Paperback, 80 pages
Published April 1st 2004 by Kessinger Publishing (first published 1922)
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Feb 17, 2012 §-- rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: poetry
Continuous with A Shropshire Lad, but perhaps more tolerable because it's shorter. Still all the poems are of the same mood, which can be tiring, but it is of a mood which we will all recognize as one we've had at one point or another. It is the mood of feeling cosmically cheated, of disappointment that this is all there is. Housman writes of the athlete dead young, the belle dead young, the soldier dead before he lost his virginity, the old man realizing how irrelevant and uncool he is now who ...more
Michael Palkowski
Aug 26, 2015 Michael Palkowski rated it really liked it
Recommended to Michael by: Peter Hitchens
A. E Housman is underrated as a poet and his negligence within the poetic cannon probably has to do with his lack of output. As an intellectual, he focused more on scholarly translations which gave his writing an archaic feel at times. In this collection, there is a cycle of poems all covering similar themes and ideas, but they strike you with their poignancy and uniqueness. His metaphors are very distinctive and he makes the most of his extensive vocabulary. A good example is his use of the ...more
David
When I was four-and-twenty
I heard a wise man say,
'Give crowns and pounds and guineas
But not your heart away;
Give pearls away and rubies
But keep your fancy free.'
But I was four-and-twenty,
No use to talk to me.

When I was four-and-twenty
I heard him say again,
'The heart out of the bosom
Was never given in vain;
'Tis paid with sighs a plenty
And sold for endless rue.'

And I am three-and-fifty,
And oh, 'tis true, 'tis true.
Richard
Apr 27, 2010 Richard rated it it was amazing
Verse rendering of the same theme (and more) as in "Ender's Game": every level gets harder, and there is no one to help.

Excerpt from Housman: "Oh often have I washed and dressed / And what's to show for all my pain? / Let me lie abed and rest: / Ten thousand times I've done my best / And all's to do again."

God be thanked, that's not life's Full story, but it seems all-to-true of our experience of life, at times.
Marcele
Oct 11, 2014 Marcele rated it really liked it
Really loved the pessimism and descant of his poetry.




Yonder see the morning blink:
The sun is up, and up must I,
To wash and dress and eat and drink
And look at things and talk and think
And work, and God knows why.
Oh often have I washed and dressed
And what's to show for all my pain?
Let me lie abed and rest:
Ten thousand times I've done my best
And all's to do again.
Nullaesomines
Jul 17, 2012 Nullaesomines rated it it was amazing

COULD man be drunk for ever
With liquor, love, or fights,
Lief should I rouse at morning
And lief lie down of nights.

But men at whiles are sober
And think by fits and starts,
And if they think, they fasten
Their hands upon their hearts.

A.E. Housman
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the laws of God the laws of man 1 3 Oct 31, 2011 12:45PM  
38069
Alfred Edward (A.E.) Housman was a noted classical scholar and a poet. To the wider public he is best known for his poem "A Shropshire Lad" (1896), while to his fellow classicists it is his critical editing of Manilius that has earned him enduring fame.

Housman was born on March 26, 1859 in Fockbury, Worcestershire, England, the eldest of seven children. A gifted student Housman won a scholarship t
...more
More about A.E. Housman...

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“I, a stranger and afraid
In a world I never made.”
23 likes
“The year might age, and cloudy
The lessening day might close,
But air of other summers
Breathed from beyond the snows,
And I had hope of those.

They came and were and are not
And come no more anew;
And all the years and seasons
That ever can ensue
Must now be worse and few.

So here's an end of roaming
On eves when autumn nighs:
The ear too fondly listens
For summer's parting sighs,
And then the heart replies.”
6 likes
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