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Getting a Job: A Study of Contacts and Careers
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Getting a Job: A Study of Contacts and Careers

3.32  ·  Rating Details ·  25 Ratings  ·  4 Reviews
This classic study of how 282 men in the United States found their jobs not only proves "it's not what you know but who you know," but also demonstrates how social activity influences labor markets. Examining the link between job contacts and social structure, Granovetter recognizes networking as the crucial link between economists studies of labor mobility and more focuse ...more
Paperback, 259 pages
Published March 15th 1995 by University Of Chicago Press (first published 1995)
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William
Jan 29, 2015 William rated it it was ok
The fact that this was the pioneering book that established the field of economic sociology does not change the fact that trying to get through this book is a gruesomely bland process.
rob
Dec 12, 2011 rob rated it liked it
Shelves: networking
The information is mostly useful, but the academic format is tough to slog through. It could have been summarized as:
- You'll probably find out about jobs from people you've worked with before, people who you aren't particularly close to.
- Jobs are usually about 2 connections away.
- You don't have to have a huge list of close personal contacts, just make sure that people in your list kinda remember who you are. That's good enough.
Vaughn
Jul 30, 2009 Vaughn rated it it was ok
conceptually interesting, but what a meandering read.
Tracey Duncan
Aug 24, 2007 Tracey Duncan rated it it was ok
don't read this book if you want to get a job.
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American sociologist and professor at Stanford University who has created theories in modern sociology since the 1970s. He is best known for his work in social network theory and in economic sociology, particularly his theory on the spread of information in social networks known as "The Strength of Weak Ties" (1973).
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“....when it comes to finding out about new jobs - or, for that matter, new information, or new ideas - "weak ties" are always more important than strong ties.” 0 likes
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