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Envisioning Ecotopia: The U.S. Green Movement and the Politics of Radical Social Change
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Envisioning Ecotopia: The U.S. Green Movement and the Politics of Radical Social Change

2.0 of 5 stars 2.00  ·  rating details  ·  1 rating  ·  1 review
How do various worldviews, praxis orientations, and preferred future visions differ between the three major subcultures within the American Green Movement? Drawing on his experience as an activist, Kenn Kassman explains the distinctions between the three elements, which he terms "Neo-Primitivism," "Mystical Deep Ecology," and "Social Ecology" What emerges is a perceptive a ...more
Hardcover, 160 pages
Published October 28th 1997 by Praeger
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Matthew
This book could've been so much better. It promised a lot - analyzing the dominant subcultures and praxes within the American Green movement, how they relate to the four pillars/ten key values, how they might achieve loose Green unity and the Green potential to transform American politics - but ends up failing to demonstrate much of anything.

I can't decide if the faults of Kassman's analysis are due mainly to sloppy scholarship (misspells names, confuses Charles Reich and Robert Reich in citati
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Jun 11, 2011
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