To Crush the Moon (The Queendom of Sol #4)
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To Crush the Moon (The Queendom of Sol #4)

3.9 of 5 stars 3.90  ·  rating details  ·  83 ratings  ·  5 reviews
In the conclusion to this epic interstellar adventure by Nebula Award nominee Wil McCarthy, humanity stands at a crossroads as the heroes who fashioned a man-made heaven must rescue their descendants from eternal damnation….

TO CRUSH THE MOON

Once the Queendom of Sol was a glowing monument to humankind’s loftiest dreams. Ageless and immortal, its citizens lived in peaceful s...more
Paperback, 400 pages
Published May 31st 2005 by Bantam Spectra (first published January 1st 2005)
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Daniel Roy
To Crush the Moon is part 4 of Wil McCarthy's Queendom of Sol series. The first three novels in the series are: The Collapsium, The Wellstone, and Lost in Transmission. If you haven't read any of these, I would strongly recommend you'd stop reading this review right now, and pick the first novels. Myself, I read Lost in Transmission first, and fell in love with the wonderful mix of character development and hard SF that Wil McCarthy provides.

That being said, is To Crush the Moon as good as Lost...more
Mike
This book answered questions the first two books in the trilogy raised in their first and last chapters.

I was totally hooked by this book and could not put it down. The ending reminded me a little of Orson Scott Card's Ender's Game, but that may have been me. Mind you I was also slightly disappointed with it. A little bit of a cop out in some ways and in others a big build up that left me wondering is that it? Oh...

Having said all that I want more, I will try to find more Wil McCarthy.
Richard
The author's creative imagination appears to exceed his skills as a storyteller and writer. This story line is inconsistent in all of his books. In addition, he has a penchant for introducing details that are not, later, tied into the story line. I regard these as "loose ends," and there are way too many of them in McCarthy's books.
Mike Ehlers
Good conclusion to the series, and the idea to crush the moon was interesting. Over time, I remember that this was a nice conclusion after the other books, but specifics don't stand out.
Rob
Interesting concept, compact the moon so its surface gravity is high enough to hold an atmosphere and let people live on its surface. If only it were that simple...
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Science fiction author and Chief Technology Officer for Galileo Shipyards


Engineer/Novelist/Journalist/Entrepreneur Wil McCarthy is a former contributing editor for WIRED magazine and science columnist for the SyFy channel (previously SciFi channel), where his popular "Lab Notes" column ran from 1999 through 2009. A lifetime member of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, he has been...more
More about Wil McCarthy...
The Collapsium (The Queendom of Sol #1) Bloom The Wellstone (The Queendom of Sol #2) Lost in Transmission (The Queendom of Sol #3) Hacking Matter: Levitating Chairs, Quantum Mirages, And The Infinite Weirdness Of Programmable Atoms

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