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Tarzan in Color, 1938-1939
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Tarzan in Color, 1938-1939

3.0 of 5 stars 3.00  ·  rating details  ·  2 ratings  ·  1 review
Reprints the Tarzan Sunday page drawn by Berne Hogarth from the last part of 1938 and the first part of 1939.
Hardcover, 64 pages
Published August 1st 1994 by Nbm Pub Co
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Mike Jensen
How the mighty TARZAN Sunday page has fallen! Hogarth's lush art is better than before, but the stories disappoint. The clichés of vol. 7 continue, and the cliffhangers are even worse. 22 of the 52 Sunday pages end with Tarzan in immediate danger and another several end with him captive. Most of the rest show someone plotting against him. This is tedious in a book, and while probably more tolerable when each Sunday page was read a week apart, the structure is a tedious. This book is for hardcore...more
Nigel_s
Nigel_s marked it as to-read
Jul 17, 2011
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85715
Burne Hogarth started young. Born in 1911, he was enrolled in the Chicago Art Institute at the age of 12 and an assistant cartoonist at Associated Editors' Syndicate at 15. At the age of 26, he was chosen from a pool of a dozen applicants as Hal Foster's successor on the United Features Syndicate strip, "Tarzan". His first strip, very much in Foster's style, appeared May 9, 1937. It wasn't long be...more
More about Burne Hogarth...
Drawing Dynamic Hands Dynamic Figure Drawing Dynamic Anatomy Drawing the Human Head Dynamic Wrinkles and Drapery: Solutions for Drawing the Clothed Figure

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