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Hometown Appetites: The Story of Clementine Paddleford, the Forgotten Food Writer Who Chronicled How America Ate
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Hometown Appetites: The Story of Clementine Paddleford, the Forgotten Food Writer Who Chronicled How America Ate

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3.63 of 5 stars 3.63  ·  rating details  ·  83 ratings  ·  26 reviews
The rollicking biography of Clementine Paddleford: �a go- anywhere, taste-anything, ask-everything kind of reporter who traveled more than 50,000 miles a year in search of stories. . . . matched as a regional-food pioneer only by James Beard.� (R. W. Apple , Jr., The New York Times)

In Hometown Appetites, an award-winning food writer and a leading university archivist come
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Hardcover, 352 pages
Published September 18th 2008 by Gotham (first published 2008)
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(showing 1-30 of 271)
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Susan
This book about Clementine Paddleford, mid-20th century food critic/observer, is a fascinating study of a driven woman creating the beginnings of the modern food revolution. I started reading this out of interest in the "food revolution" but quickly became engrossed in Paddleford's life and travels. I recommend this for anyone with an interest in food writing, an interest in American journalism, or an interest in strong women.
Jen
An informative and fascentating biography of a woman I had never heard of, but am now completely obsessed with. (Wish I could afford her famous book, now out of print.) Any self-respecting Food Network fan MUST read this book!
Elevate Difference
In 1960, Clementine Paddleford published How America Eats, a compilation of twelve years of her columns in the New York Herald Tribune and This Week magazine. During her lifetime, Paddleford traveled over 800,000 miles in pursuit of recipes from home cooks, restaurant owners, and small family businesses. Paddleford gathered stories and advice from home cooks all over the United States and documented her pursuits.

During her time at the New York Herald Tribune, Paddleford’s readership reached twel
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Jeweleye
Hometown Appetites is a fairly interesting bit of Americana about Clementine Paddleford, the "forgotten" food writer from the 1920s to the 1960s. Paddleford wrote about food and the people who prepared it in Studs Terkel style. Every recipe she published in her column had a story to go with it. After 12 years and 800,000 miles, she published the recipes and the stories in a book called How America Eats.

I first heard about Paddleford when NPR interviewed one of the authors of this biography. Tha
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Shippseattle
Nov 10, 2008 Shippseattle marked it as to-read
The rollicking biography of Clementine Paddleford: �a go- anywhere, taste-anything, ask-everything kind of reporter who traveled more than 50,000 miles a year in search of stories. . . . matched as a regional-food pioneer only by James Beard.� (R. W. Apple , Jr., The New York Times)<...more [close] The rollicking biography of Clementine Paddleford: �a go- anywhere, taste-anything, ask-everything kind of reporter who traveled more than 50,000 miles a year in search of stories. . . . matched as ...more
Cathy Farrell
I picked this up off the bargain table, just for the heck of it. (Besides, who could resist the name Clementine Paddleford?) It surprised me how much I enjoyed it. I'd never heard of Clementine, who was really the first nationwide foodie star (WAY before the word "foodie" had been coined). She kind of amazing, traveling the country and describing food to people all over.
Since reading this, I periodically check for some of her books when I'm in used bookstores, since she's long since out of prin
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Karen
Along with some great recipes from mid-century America, Hometown Appetites chronicles a fascinating and almost lost personality who was key to the food scene. Unlike chefs Child and Claiborn, Paddleford was almost like a food archeologist, traveling around America to find what people were really eating. Less appealing here is some of the writing, which feels repetitive at places, as if the authors feel the need to remind us what happened in the last chapter. Still, this is entertaining and enjoy ...more
Alison
I had vaguely heard of Clementine Paddleford, but hadn't realized the scope of her influence in the food writing world, especially from about 1940-1955 or so. This was a well-written, interesting biography of her life and career, and makes me want to read her major book, America Eats. There's no Kindle edition unfortunately and used copies are a little pricey. The book does include recipes from time to time, illustrating the kind of food that Paddleford specialized in - American regional cuisine ...more
Elise
Boy, I really wanted to like this book. But it was just so uninteresting. Not a biography I would recommend. What Paddleford did was extraordinary. Her personal life is very veiled, however, and her cutting of corners--like her enthusiastic endorsement of ready-made products, her occasional fibbing on a story--is glossed over. Of course, those two aspects would have added a lot of interest to this boring, steadfastly chronological story.
Aubree Bowling
This book was really interesting--it grabbed my attention because I liked that Paddleford is from my hometown. And she wrote about food, which I love to read about and find interesting. But I also found it to be a good picture of the life of a career woman that began working in the 1920's. I found it a bit sad that in that era a woman who wanted to work at a promising career couldnt' really "have it all" and be married, too.
Shauna Mckelly
I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in the history of food, food criticism or the lives of interesting female journalists. Before Rachel Ray, Emeril Lagasse, James Beard or Julia Child became household names, there was Clementine Paddleford. This book not only delves into her extensive and impressive resume, the book also includes more than fifty recipes from Paddleford's files.
Damon
America's curiosity about food & recipes from all over the country was practically founded by this woman, Clementine Paddleford. On it's own, it's a tale of a strong willed woman from Kansas, determined to make it in the all male world of newspaper writing. Plus the recipes and you have a tribute to generations past and a peek into the kitchens of your grandmother and her peers.
Carrie
This book was a great introduction to someone I knew nothing about - Clementine Paddleford, a smart and ambitious Kansas farm girl, who grew up to be a journalist with the New York Herald-Tribune, travelling the world and writing about food. Pretty amazing life, she had.
Lisa Kelsey
Oct 25, 2008 Lisa Kelsey rated it 4 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: Anyone interested in the history of food writing, regional cooking or even early women journalists
I really enjoyed rediscovering Clementine Paddleford. It's always nice when someone this interesting gets rescued from obscurity. Anyone interested in the history of food writing, regional cooking or even early women journalists would enjoy this well-written biography.
Rob Banks
Fascinating story about some I'd never heard of before reading this book. Because she started near me in Kansas, it was of special interest. Amazing the impact she had on what became a national obsession with food and yet was almost forgotten.
Meg
A delightful look at a little-known American character. Excellent role-model, career writer and great human being. Clementine was amazing, glad to "get to know her" through this book. Wish someone would make a movie about this gal!
Andrea
Clementine was a very interesting lady, at a time when women were still expected to stay at home, she was a career journalist who championed the housewives and farmwives of America. The writing is journalistic, but a fast read.
Gina Bégin
Dec 28, 2008 Gina Bégin marked it as to-read
Heard about it from an NPR show (the Splendid Table?)- talks about how Americans ate in the first half of the 20th century. I love old-fashioned food, so I'm looking forward to reading this.
Hlry
this book was just okay. got some interesting recipes out of it. there was something a little too midwestern about the writing style for my tastes (sorry any midwesterners--you know what i mean)
Karen
Very easy to read fun book about the first superstar foodie. Extremely accessible non-fiction for my friends who claim non-fiction is work not pleasure.
Redhead
Wonderful true story of Kansas girl who made it to the top. Made me wish I had known this remarkable woman who conquered the odds in so many ways.
Christiane
This kind of thing is right up my alley, but, as with most biographies, I found it a little on the dull side, prose-wise.
Michelle
very facinating and factual story about a food writer you may not know...
Beth
This book was written by a professor I had in college. Congratulations, Kelly!
Cynthia
Apr 05, 2012 Cynthia rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  (Review from the author)
I am the co-author of this book, so I am bias.
Jrabach
Started off great, but it petered out.
Laura
Laura marked it as to-read
Nov 17, 2014
Erin Duffy
Erin Duffy marked it as to-read
Nov 15, 2014
Wendy
Wendy marked it as to-read
Nov 08, 2014
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An Person marked it as to-read
Nov 07, 2014
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