Sharpe's Regiment (Sharpe, #17)
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Sharpe's Regiment (Sharpe #17)

4.11 of 5 stars 4.11  ·  rating details  ·  3,182 ratings  ·  57 reviews
A corrupt political plot threatens to put an end to the South Essex regiment and the life of Major Richard Sharpe when he investigates and discovers an illegal recruiting ring selling soldiers like cattle to other divisions.
Paperback, 304 pages
Published June 1st 2001 by Penguin Books (first published January 1st 1986)
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Jason Koivu
This is not exactly a prototypical Sharpe novel in that there is no pitched battle to be had against Napoleon's forces. Instead, Major Richard Sharpe is back on English soil and his enemy is the British army itself. The wheres and the whos matter little in a Bernard Cornwell book, because you're going to get pretty much the same thing every time, and if you like/love it once, you'll like/love it again and again. Cornwell knows his winning formula inside and out. He excels at action sequences. He...more
Graham
I've been reading the Sharpe series for around seven years now (starting at the very beginning) and I'm finally getting towards the end - only four more books to go after this one! Not that I'm planning to rush the final few, in fact I'll draw them out and savour them as I have always done.

SHARPE'S REGIMENT offers something a bit different to the usual Peninsular action. This one's more of a conspiracy book (a la SHARPE'S PREY or GALLOWS THIEF), with Sharpe returning to England to investigate a...more
Deanne
Getting toward the end of the Sharpe series of books, not far from Warterloo and the end of the Napoleonic wars. Sharpe has waged war across India, Portugal and Spain and is now about to enter France, but first a trip back to Blighty to pick up some men. Don't seem to be getting any recruits from home, but that's because there's someone up to some shenanigans. Sharpe also manages to work his way through the female population of any country he's in. Wonder if he's an ancestor of James Bond, only...more
R.D. LeCoeur
I've read quite a bit of Mr Cornwell's stuff, although I've avoided the Sharpe series as I watched the tv series which was very enjoyable. However, as this book was on offer at Asda(wallmart) for only £1.00 I decided to give it a go!
First up I never realized how miscast Sean Bean was. He's a northerner with a pronounced northern accent and it appears from this book that Sharpe was from the slums of London and should've sounded more like an early Michael Caine.

Anyhow back to the book.
I thoroughl...more
Bjoern
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Rebecca
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Jane
A nice plot change-up in the series with Sharpe battling corrupt British aristocrats rather than the French. Of course there's a woman or two and a few other predictable elements, but we're getting close to Waterloo and I will keep reading.
Jeff Yoak
Yet again, I've found a new favorite Sharpe novel. This one was unique in that Sharpe's enemies and struggle aren't military or personal and violent per se, but the corrupt organization of his own army.

Sharpe is a great personification of bravery and integrity throughout the series, but one can imagine being brave in a battle. The sense in which being brave is in your immediate self-interest is accessible. It is entirely another to go out of your way to find trouble with your own command, commit...more
Joyce Lagow
No. 17 in the Richard Sharpe series.[return][return]Sharpe and Sgt. Harper are sent back to England to discover the whereabouts of promised recruits for their battered South Essex regiment. What they discover is an illegal recruiting ring that auctions off newly-trained soldiers to regiments that have a hard time obtaining volunteers, such as those regiments that serve in the fever-ridden West Indies. Sharpe and Harper go undercover and � steal� back a newly-formed group of soldiers and through...more
Mick
Sharpe's Regiment in an oddity among the generally formulaic long running Sharpe series, in that it takes Sharpe and Patrick Harper away from the action in Europe, and sends them to England for the majority of the book.

The year is 1813. Across Europe, the tide has turned against Napoleon. In Spain, after years of hard fighting, Wellington's army finally stands ready to cross the border and invade. Major Richard Sharpe, acting commander of the South Essex, will not be joining his mentor in the v...more
Kathy Davie
On April 10, 2009, I did a VERY short review: "Love the battle, tactics, camaraderie, and the history. "

This time, I got into it a bit more, LOL:

Seventeenth in the Richard Sharpe fictional military history series and revolving around Major Richard Sharpe and the South Essex. This one takes place in England. Funny place to do battle with the regiment…

My Take
Heart-stopping as always! Richard is so terrifyingly naive. He scares me to death.

I love Cornwell's descriptions, and the way in which he de...more
Dark-Draco
It is a close run thing to decide whether this or Sharpe's Honour, is my favourite story. Like the previous novel, this one isn't about a single big battle, but actually takes place back in England. Sharpe and the rest of the army are on the verge of marching into France, but Sharpe's regiment has had no new recruits for months and the few men left are going to be split up amongst the other battalions gathering for war. Sharpe returns to England with Harper, intent on finding out what is going...more
Stephen
The year is 1813, and the Allied army stands upon the Pyrenees awaiting the invasion of France and victory. Napoleon's empire is shrinking: he once stood as master of Europe, but Wellington's army and shrew diplomacy have stripped the Iberian peninsula from his influence, and the eastern members of the allied Coalition are increasingly restive. Now even Austria seems ready to enter the war against Napoleon. For Richard Sharpe, this should be a proud, happy moment. Wherever Wellington has triumph...more
Elizabeth
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Phil
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Barbara Ghylin
This was one the those that I had to keep reading and I had to finish. It was one of the best Sharpe books I have read yet. Richard Sharpe has learned the art of being an officer in a time when what he has accomplished is not appreciated at all. His men will follow him anywhere he takes them knowing he is leading from the front. Very much a soldier's soldier.
Joel Larmour
Another satisfying Sharpe adventure. Sharpe has help to save his regiment's future and gets properly married this time to a woman he may actually have a long term future with. The baddies and how Sharpe outwits them along with some good fortune keeps the reader hooked in this series.
Peter Hall
This book is one that not only has espionage but also includes battles and political corruption. Sharpe and Sargent Harper are sent back to England to find out where the promised reinforcements are and discover a illegal recruiting ring that auction off soldiers to other regiments. This illegal recruitment ring threatens to end the existence of Sharpe's beloved Regiment the South essex. To save the South Essex Sharpe and Harper steal back a battalion of soldiers and send them off to join the res...more
Ed
Jul 22, 2009 Ed rated it 5 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: Historical fiction fans
Another great book in the Richard Sharpe series.

The story, which takes place mostly in England, has Sharpe uncovering a scheme to "crimp" (auction off) trained soldiers instead of sending them as replacements to Sharpe's regiment in Spain.

There are the usual ups and downs as Sharpe faces political forces he little understands and has little patience for. He, of course, triumphs in the end and wins the fair maiden in the bargain.

The epilogue describes the battle of Nivelle as British troops mov...more
Marko
Another one of the "original" Sharpe series, this was an excellent read. Very different from the rest of the series since this one has Sharpe visiting his homeland, trying to find new recruits for his regiment to replace those who have fallen on Portuguese and Spanish battlefields. But things back home are not as simple as they first seem and Sharpe soon finds himself entangled in politics and finds himself new enemies at high levels.

I've said it before, but it bears repeating that Cornwell's ea...more
John Reas
The Richard Sharpe series continues with this excellent work in which Richard returns to England prior to the invasion of France to retrieve his battalion reserves. What is supposed to be a simple trip to bring more men back to the battlefield turns out to be a struggle in which Richard uncovers a conspiracy that reaches the highest levels of the British government that makes him a marked man. Once again, Bernard Cornwell tells a great story that brings together the events of the Napoleonic wars...more
Rick Brindle
One of the better Sharpe novels from the excellent series. Here, Sharpe's regiment is on the verge of ceasing to exist, and he has to go back to good old Blighty and find the replacements. It's never that simple for our hero, though, and he uncovers all sorts of dastardly deeds along the way. Of course, being Sharpe, he just about manages to win through, even when it seems there is no way, and also being Sharpe, he also manages to get to grips with one or two beautiful women along the way.
Ernie
See Sharpe's Rifles
Ross
This is one of the best books in this large series. Sharpe is sent back to England to find out where the replacements are for his regiment in Spain.
He finds corruption at the highest levels of the government which threatens his life. A different kind of action for Sharpe and a change of pace for the reader.
A couple of years after my first reading I am going through an audio book version. The narrator Fredrick Davidson is a favorite. He really brings the story to life.
Kimberly Chapman
This was a nice break from the continental battles as Richard Sharpe has to navigate his way through England to find and reclaim the men that should have been sent to his forces in Spain. It's got wonderful hefty amounts of Sharpe angst and fury, and while the bad guys are a little too over-the-top bad, that's mitigated by several lesser baddies who have redeemable qualities.

But if you like Sharpe's character - which I absolutely do - you'll like this book.
Dawn
This is the tenth Sharpe book I've read and rather than getting bored with them I am enjoying them more with each adventure.
Sharpe and Harper travel to England to find the recruits they desperately need but who aren't being sent to the regiment, before the South Essex is broken up forever.
Old characters return and new despicable characters are introduced. And what would a Sharpe book be without a love interest or two. This is one of my favorite so far.
Daleb.
Tue. June 19, 2012
Much better than the movie...I hate it when they condense/compact scenes and even more when they combine several characters into one!!
Great read though.
The Library Doesn't have Sharpe's Honor, so I had to skip that to read this one. They also don't have Sharpe's Siege or Waterloo! :o((( So, as i don't have an e-reader and couldn't afford to download 'em anyway, I will have to miss out on Those 3 e-books from My library.
xoDaleB.xo
Margareth8537
Quite interesting to see Sharpe in England again, and exposed to the dishonesty and rapacity of many of the officers at home.
The way in which the common soldier was viewed as simply cannon fodder and scum was shared by many throughout the army who probably had more fellow feeling for their French equivalents than the soldiers they ordered about - or left their NCOs to order while thet drank in the Officers' Club!
Mike Perry
This has to be one of my favorite Sharpe books. Once again Sharpe manages to bloody the French when drastically outnumbered. The Americans play an integral part in this and I don't really like spoiler reviews but I cheered when a brilliant move extricated Sharpe and his men. I loved the surprise. Reminded me of the movie Diggstown for the fact that I jumped up and laughed at his cleverness.
Jansen Wee
While this adventure largely takes place back in England, the excitement level doesn't abate one bit. Instead of the familiar French or "evil Spanish partisan", Sharpe has to put up with enemies of a different kind ...... political and bureaucratic. But Sharpe has friends, and also his belief in his own trusted ways. A step closer to full command for Sharpe.
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12542
Cornwell was born in London in 1944. His father was a Canadian airman, and his mother was English, a member of the Women's Auxiliary Air Force. He was adopted and brought up in Essex by the Wiggins family, who were members of the Peculiar People, a strict Protestant sect who banned frivolity of all kinds and even medicine. After he left them, he changed his name to his mother's maiden name, Cornwe...more
More about Bernard Cornwell...
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