Do Try to Speak as We Do: The Diary of an American Au Pair
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Do Try to Speak as We Do: The Diary of an American Au Pair

3.06 of 5 stars 3.06  ·  rating details  ·  313 ratings  ·  52 reviews
It seems like the perfect job: an upper middle class English family desperately needs a nanny. The father is an aspiring novelist, the children are well-heeled, and the mother's accent radiates with charm over the transatlantic phone. So young Melissa jumps at the chance to travel overseas and live an aristocratic life of tea and crumpets. But her romantic notions are shat...more
Hardcover, 320 pages
Published March 12th 2001 by Thomas Dunne Books
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Marie
"The Nanny Diaries" in the UK, "Do Try to Speak As We Do" (the title on my copy of this book) is about a milktoast of a young woman, Melissa, who takes on a job as an au pair in Britain, sight unseen.

It's generally known that au pairs are abused and less regulated than nannies. They also tend to be less experienced.

Melissa expected England and Scotland to be right off the screen of a Merchant Ivory film and was gravely disappointed to meet her snobby and verbally abusive employer, Mrs. Haig-Erei...more
Karen Hansen
I was given this book over four years ago at a Bookcrossing meet up ( a really fun one at Bob's Big Boy in Burbank) and it has sat on my bookshelf ever since. I've been battling a terrible virus and decided that I needed a light read, so I plucked it off the shelf.

I rated Marjorie Leet Ford's "The Dairy of an American Au Pair: A Novel" four out of five stars, not because it's a great book, but I think for it's genre (definitely pulpy chick-lit) it was decent. It's a quick, fun read.

The story is...more
Katharyn
Overwhelmed with her life Melissa leave sunny San Francisco to be an Au Pair in the clement United Kingdom, in hopes of gathering her thoughts and regaining some happiness. Nothing is as she expected it to be, and though she’ll ultimately look back on the experiences with fondness much of her time is spend frustrated and confused. Yet somehow Melissa does find herself, and is surprised to find she’s not exactly the person she thought she was.

I love to read books written in a diary format, fictio...more
Lisa (scarlet21)
Second time of reading and I still enjoyed it. The Diary of an American Au Pair is exactly that - Melissa is the American Au Pair, previously employee of an Advertising company who decides to take some time out in England, finding herself after her wedding to Tedward is called off.
Through her writing we discover that Melissa always seems to just fall into things with no planning, she is a bit of a drip, a doormat, taken for granted by her un-endearing boyfriend in America, treated like a complet...more
Jennifer
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Dee
This book was very interesting as a contrast between current (2001) Britsh and American cultures. Upper class British - MP's family - need Au Pair for their three children, one of whom, a 3-year-old, is deaf. The young American (23?) just fired from her job in San Francisco, and running away from a wedding she does/doesnot want, takes the job. The wife/mother/ Priscilla haig-Ereildoun, is a monster --- demanding rediculous levels of precision in ironing! and cleaning, preparing meals, etc., that...more
Elizabeth K.
This was quick and mostly fun, a first person novel about being an American nanny for an English family. A good deal of it is indeed that voyeuristic trend of finger-wagging at mothers behaving badly. The aspects I liked the most were the general "fish out of water" parts, I think the author did a great job of describing the experience of being a young person working in a different country -- the times when it's great, the times when it's educational, the times when it's maddening, and the times...more
Lize
This one was recommended by Nancy Pearl in "Book Lust to Go", and it charmed me. On the surface, it looks like a "Nanny Diaries in London", as early 20-ish Melissa, newly laid off from a San Francisco advertising job and fighting a severe case of 'post-engagement cold feet', takes a post as an au pair for the three childrean of a Scottish MP and his wife (who is horrid enough to give "Nanny Diaries" Mrs. X a run for her money). But the writing is good enough ("Another day, glutting my sorrow on...more
Ann
I honestly don`t know what to say about this. Melissa travels to the UK to take on a job as a nanny. She is introduced to a family with three kids. Melissa has a fiancee, Tedward and Simon, friend?

I bought this book, because it takes place in Scotland and England. I liked to get to know more about differences in use of English in the UK and the US.

But.. There was so much narration. I like dialogues. Melissa had the need to describe everything. Everything. Starting from the houses she lived in....more
Brittany
Sep 15, 2008 Brittany rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Karen
I can see why other people didn't like this book very much, as nothing big really happens. But I really liked it becuase I related to it so well. Other than the engaged to be married part, or the au pair part, or the being skinny part, I was Melissa once apon a time. I'm from Oregon, as she is, and I went off to live in London, as she did, I got confussed with the English lingo (eg bathroom vs wc or loo), as she did, lives for the moment, as she does, and gained 10 pounds off of digestives, as s...more
Sariah
This was a kind of fun, kind of easy read. Very similar to "The Nanny Diaries", but different enough that it didn't feel like I was reading the same story by a different author (I hate that!). I loved the comparisons of life in the US and in Great Britain. I can't get enough of England (yeah, I'm pretty much an Anglophile). I found the main character, Melissa, likable enough, but a little too flaky and/or passive. She made a lot of very spur of the moment decisions and could never stick to her c...more
Stephanie
I enjoyed the narrator more than the plot, which was a little plodding and meandering for my tastes, but it held my interest the whole way through. And the book had a few twists that I did not expect, which was a welcome surprise. Also, of course, as an American who reads and watches a lot of stuff about English and Scottish people, I really liked her position as an American among the Brits. That made for some good anecdotes -- like how everyone thought it was so funny when she said "sure" inste...more
Tori
2004- I guess after reading The Nanny Diaries, which I liked, I expected this book to be similar. It wasn't. Melissa, an American, goes to England to work as an au pair for the Haig- Ereildoun family after loosing her job and calling off her wedding. The writing style is strange (it's not written in a diary format) and it seemed like it was happening many years ago...I actually couldn't tell the exact time period it was set in. There really is no plot, so it's hard to describe it much further. T...more
Rhonda
Why isn't this book more popular? Why is it relegated to "chicklit"? Why would anyone give it less than 100 pp. before they quit? The Observer called Ford a "comparative anthropologist" for her skill at portraying Brit/Am cultural interplay. (My favorite aspect: the breathtaking rudeness of Brits, who claim to be so civilized.) Ford's plotting is SUBTLE, folks, not "slow"! You can't see her doing it for the first half of the book because she's so good at it! And when it all comes together, you g...more
Kelly Brown
Quick easy read. Funny and charming. Much for me to relate to as I am currently an American Au pair in Spain!
Alexis
Not a very good book, but if you are looking for something that you can read without thinking, and if you like all things Europe/Britain, than it may be worth looking into. I was annoyed from the beginning at the choice of the name "Tedward" for the main character's fiancee and was angry throughout the book everytime the name came up. If annoying names don't bother you, you may add another star to the rating ;-) And I appologize to any Tedwards out there who I just offended!
Sarah
As someone who has crossed the pond and lived with Brits, and as someone who has worked as an au pair (though here, stateside) I thought this was a wickedly wonderful look at the life in an upper crust British family. The narrator, Melissa, is shrewd even though she is naive...she skewers the wife in particular, but in a fair way...the cast of characters is varied and interesting and Melissa's growth seems genuine. I loved this.
Rachel Penso
I love books about nannies. I love how people probably think the stories are grossly exaggerated for the sake of humor, but nine times out of ten, either I or someone I know has experienced something shockingly similar. I will admit, though, I was getting pretty frustrated with what a push-over the nanny in this book was. And this book was a little more outlandish than others I have read, but still very entertaining!
Lisa
May 13, 2013 Lisa rated it 2 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: No one
I don't normally do this, but I actually stopped reading this book a little over 1/2 way through, because it was THAT boring.

Like the title indicates, it's a diary of an American Au Pair who goes to England after her personal life falls apart just so she can basically step away from everything for awhile. It started out fine but then I thought it got to be too repetitive and she began to just complain too much.
Laurie
A work of fiction which feels like a memoir, and I wish it really were...the author's bio indicates that she WAS an au pair in England once, and I'd really rather hear of her actual cross-cultural experiences than her to-an-unknown-extent-fictionalized ones. But as an Anglophile American who has raised and cared for children, it was still a very interesting and entertaining read.
NC
Jan 22, 2014 NC rated it 3 of 5 stars
Shelves: fiction
Fun!
Arnold
A relaxing read, but a book that makes you think how you would deal with similar cultural difference of those who speak English and those from whose culture ours has evolved. A friendly book with a good level of tension. Addresses not ultimate questions but questions we all encounter and that have a bit of ultimate-ness about them
Katie
The edition I read was actually called "Do Try to Speak as We Do," and I picked it up on recommendation from Nancy Pearls' "Book Lust to Go." It was a fun, fairly quick read with lots of interesting and amusing moments of British vs. American language, culture, and lifestyle.
Pat
I really enjoyed this story. Of course I was intrigued by some of the details that the main character described. I enjoyed it so much and it bugged me that I could not recall the title. Thanks to a kind person it clicked with, I can actually go back and read it again.
Meredith
Interesting for me to read about someone else's experience as a foreigner in a foreign country...especially having it highlighted to the main character that she's an American! Kind of fun to see the funny quirks that come up that make us different culturally...
Kate
I found this book at St. Vinnie's and decided to pick it up. I liked the Nanny Diaries and hope for a bit of escapism but light hearted reading with this one. This was an interesting read, comparing British and American cultures..
Rachel Cohen
Kind of fun and easy read, but ultimately pointless. And I love chick lit with a good plot, but this wasn't even that. I stopped 40 pages short because I had to return it to the library and didn't care enough to renew it.
Carol
This story of an au pair in a Scottish Family has some nice moments, particularly when the main character works at teaching the family's deaf three year old to speak. I have yet to find the book compelling, but I may get there.
Gemma
Light, fun book i read on the bus over a week of commutes. Some extremely accurate, hilarious and wise observations; you'll relate if you've ever experienced culture shock (be it geographical, generational or gender-based!)
Jen S.
Loved this! Way better than The Nanny Diaries. More genuine and sincere, less complaining and whining.
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