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Dominance Without Hegemony: History and Power in Colonial India
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Dominance Without Hegemony: History and Power in Colonial India

3.9  ·  Rating Details ·  40 Ratings  ·  3 Reviews
What is colonialism and what is a colonial state? Ranajit Guha points out that the colonial state in South Asia was fundamentally different from the metropolitan bourgeois state which sired it. The metropolitan state was hegemonic in character, and its claim to dominance was based on a power relation in which persuasion outweighed coercion. Conversely, the colonial state ...more
Paperback, 268 pages
Published January 15th 1998 by Harvard University Press
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Malcolm
This has had more impact on my own work than most other texts. Guha has, in this book, drawn together and reworked three previously published (long) essays to build a case for viewing history from below, for seeing the way colonised peoples see through and resist the colonisers' claims to legitimate dominance, and of the importance of the colonised to break the mould of colonial history to make history their own. Complex, demanding, sophisticated – he grapples with and unpacks ...more
Shane Avery
Mar 03, 2014 Shane Avery rated it it was amazing
To summarize in one sentence: a post-colonial study of the configurations of power, and its idioms, within a tradition of South Asian colonial historiography, where dominance was never hegemonic; “the colonial state is the barrier at which the universalist urge of capital must stop…”

Brilliant and inspired analysis...
Courtney Homer
Oct 29, 2014 Courtney Homer rated it liked it
An interesting look at the power structure of a colonized state. Written from a Marxist perspective and assuming you have a background in the history of India and prominent thinkers, Guha argues that the accepted Indian historiography is inadequate and unhistorical.
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Ranajit Guha was a historian of South Asia who was greatly influential in the Subaltern Studies group, and was the editor of several of the group's early anthologies. He migrated from India to the UK in 1959, and currently lives in Vienna, Austria.
His Elementary Aspects of Peasant Insurgency in Colonial India is widely considered to be a classic. Aside from this, his founding statement in the firs
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