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Wonders and the Order of Nature, 1150--1750
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Wonders and the Order of Nature, 1150--1750

4.29  ·  Rating Details ·  129 Ratings  ·  10 Reviews
Winner of the History of Science Society's Pfizer Prize"This book is about setting the limits of the natural and the limits of the known, wonders and wonder, from the High Middle Ages through the Enlightenment. A history of wonders as objects of natural inquiry is simultaneously an intellectual history of the orders of nature. A history of wonder as a passion of natural in ...more
Paperback, 512 pages
Published September 4th 2001 by Zone Books (first published May 22nd 1998)
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Adam
Jul 04, 2015 Adam rated it liked it
Shelves: history, uiuc-library
I was interested in this book largely for discussions of the fantastic in medieval perspective. I definitely got some of that--even the view of medieval life we get in fantasy, which is biased towards magical and interesting objects, seems to underplay the vivid and colorful reality of wonders in the lives of people in the Middle Ages (especially the elite, but even among common people). Princes and prelates hoarded collections of oddities far beyond the expected saints' bones and ersatz chunks ...more
Andy
Jan 21, 2008 Andy rated it really liked it
Fascinating book - it seems everything Lorraine Daston's touches is brilliant. This was my entrée to early-modern science studies, and a compelling and engaging introduction at that. Though I may bicker with some of Park and Daston's arguments - I think they overstate the centrality of the 17th century to the development of modernity - one forgives them the occasional overstretching, and towards the back end of the book, repetitiveness, because as a whole the work is so brillaint.

Fantastically i
...more
Melissa
Sep 12, 2007 Melissa rated it really liked it
Recommends it for: people who like science writing
This is a pretty amazing book - one of my all-time favorites. It's a history of how a sense of wonder (religious, supernatural, whatever) drove scientific investigation in pre-Modern Europe. It's science writing and writing about the history of science, but it's also about the way culture is constructed in the shadow of irrational impulses. Plus it's beautifully written and Lorraine Daston is a badass academic who can actually make a non-academic reader feel connected to what she's writing.
Matthew Rohn
Jul 18, 2017 Matthew Rohn rated it really liked it
Neat concept even for someone less interested in pre-modern history. Major recommendation for anyone interested in history of science\intellectual history
Ben Joplin
May 18, 2012 Ben Joplin rated it it was amazing
Interested in freaks and wonders, but also want to know how they got that way in the first place? Think about how huge the world was, when ostrich eggs and alligators inspired maps that contained dragon-like fish between continents. Read this before you even pick up a book on circuses or so-called hermaphrodites.
Patricia
Sep 02, 2009 Patricia rated it really liked it
It was a pleasure just to leaf through this nicely constructed book. The illustrations alone were entertaining. The argument on the changing meanings attached to wonder, especially in changing cultural contexts, was lucid and informative.
Leah
May 22, 2015 Leah rated it it was amazing
Fantastic pictures, in all senses of fantasy. Worth reading before any trip to the Cloisters (the met Cloisters)
Allison DeVito
Jul 16, 2013 Allison DeVito rated it liked it
Read this for a class, but really enjoyed the examples and the complex philosophy of wonder and curiosity.
Tina.
Feb 12, 2010 Tina. rated it it was ok
Interesting subject, but I just couldn't get into the book itself.
Alastair
Aug 17, 2008 Alastair rated it liked it
This is a spectacular but messy book. Fascinating, but remind yourself when you read it to employ a little common sense.
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Lorraine Daston (born June 9, 1951, East Lansing, Michigan)[1] is an American historian of science. Executive director of the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science (MPIWG) in Berlin, and visiting professor in the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago, she is considered an authority on Early Modern European scientific and intellectual history. In 1993, she was named a f ...more
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