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A Book of Remarkable Criminals
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A Book of Remarkable Criminals

3.27  ·  Rating Details ·  266 Ratings  ·  14 Reviews
The silent workings, and still more the explosions, of human passion which bring to light the darker elements of man's nature present to the philosophical observer considerations of intrinsic interest; while to the jurist, the study of human nature and human character with its infinite varieties, especially as affecting the connection between motive and action, between irr ...more
Paperback, 176 pages
Published December 15th 2006 by Echo Library (first published 1918)
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Priya
Sep 16, 2013 Priya rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
When I first stumbled upon this book, I was hoping for something on the lines of understanding the psychology of criminals. However, this one turned out to be a plain documentary listing of a collection of crimes in the 19th century. Given the era, the nature of crimes by themselves were plain vanilla; a sequel with 20th century incidents would be good with the level of sophistication being higher. Overall, an okay read.
Doreen Petersen
All in all not a bad book. The crimes committed were all in 1800s but still a decent read.
Rajiv Chopra
Jan 11, 2014 Rajiv Chopra rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Anyone interested in old crimes
Recommended to Rajiv by: No One
Shelves: history
This is an excellent book, and very well researched. I like it because it covers the life and crimes of criminals who were all, in a way, small criminals, but each remarkable in his or her own way.

They were not all remarkable as criminals, but their life stories are remarkable, and some of them really were remarkable in the manner they turned to crime.

The book is well-written and easy to read. I found the stories to be fascinating. Many years back, I read a book on the deadliest murderers of th
...more
Paul Trembling
Not for everybody, but if you have an interest in criminology and in history, you may well find it fascinating, as I did! Not only do you find out once notorious but now almost forgotten villains, but you also get insights into the times and cultures they lived in - not so far from ours in time, but already so different in many ways.
Ams78
Apr 17, 2013 Ams78 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This was a very interesting book of murders committed in the late 19th century. I found it to be quite fascinating, though some passages were a bit hard to understand. There were several discussions of court proceedings as well, which were intriguing. All things considered, a very good read.
Tazar Oo
Oct 21, 2009 Tazar Oo rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Online က ေဒါငးလုတရတဲအတြက ၀မးသာပါတယ။ ဖတခငသူေတြဆီ ပို႔ေပးလို႔ရတယ...။ ရာဇ၀တမမားအေၾကာငး။ ကဴးလြနသူ တရားခံေတြရဲ႕ စိတၱဇျဖစစဥ၊ ခံစားမ...၊ ကဴးလြနပံု.. စတာေတြကို အေသးစိတေလလာျခငး။ ကမၻာေကာ မခငးေတြနဲ႔ တူပါတယ...။ စိတကူးယဥဇာတလမးေတြထကစာရင ပိုဆြဲေဆာငမရွိမယထငတယ..။ ...more
Rabid Readers Reviews
I got this book as a freebie with the .mobi reader on my Blackberry. I'm a fan of true crime and had not read about any of the very interesting cases (between 1850 and 1910) before. I very much enjoyed the telling and the old fashioned morality tone and speculation of the work.
Bob
May 20, 2016 Bob rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Dry

The stories were interesting but the writing was a bit stuffy for my taste. Obviously British. It was a free download, and worth every penny
Zane Sterling
Interesting

Definitely a very unique book. Some very interesting stories that are really different, strange and many border on the bizarre.
Suzanne
Jul 13, 2013 Suzanne rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: abandoned
All i wanted to say was it would be an idea to take a breath and use a few full stops. Couldnt carry on is I was alwaus loosing interest.
Eric
Jan 25, 2017 Eric rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
This was like watching a series of Forensic Files episodes taking place in the 19th century. I wouldn't call many of these criminals remarkable but the cases were entertaining.
Vishal Parashar
Good book. Simple language easy to understand. The author grasps attention of the readers in each case, though i found most of the cases to be from france(paris).
Zoe
Zoe rated it liked it
Mar 14, 2012
Nizohonie
Nizohonie rated it it was amazing
Feb 14, 2017
Janet McDaniel
Janet McDaniel rated it liked it
Jul 17, 2014
Josephine Boorman
Josephine Boorman rated it it was ok
Nov 22, 2016
Lauren Blenkinsop
Lauren Blenkinsop rated it liked it
Aug 04, 2014
Kimber
Kimber rated it liked it
Jun 29, 2013
Costa
Costa rated it did not like it
Jun 16, 2013
Win Powell
Win Powell rated it liked it
Apr 19, 2016
Lynn Mcclelland
Apr 14, 2017 Lynn Mcclelland rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
I am usually the person who won't give up on a book ... I have to read it to the end. It once took me four years; the book was over 700 pages long, but four years .... In this case, however, I had to make an exception. While the author must have done quite a bit of research, the criminals described were somewhat 'unremarkable.' There wasn't anything t0 pique my interest -- nothing exciting to encourage me to continue reading. The other problem I had was the number of typos or grammatical errors. ...more
mary
mary rated it really liked it
Apr 12, 2017
Danielle Nola
Danielle Nola rated it really liked it
Jun 05, 2014
Sarah Renfrow
Sarah Renfrow rated it really liked it
Jun 15, 2016
Marisa Raymond
Marisa Raymond rated it liked it
Jul 07, 2014
Zac
Zac rated it really liked it
Oct 18, 2012
Anne Oliver
Anne Oliver rated it did not like it
Feb 01, 2016
Andrea Plouffe
Andrea Plouffe rated it did not like it
Jan 31, 2016
Ruth Johnstone
Ruth Johnstone rated it really liked it
Jan 18, 2014
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“The silent workings, and still more the explosions, of human passion which bring to light the darker elements of man's nature present to the philosophical observer considerations of intrinsic interest; while to the jurist, the study of human nature and human character with its infinite varieties, especially as affecting the connection between motive and action, between irregular desire or evil disposition and crime itself, is equally indispensable and difficult."—Wills on Circumstantial Evidence.” 0 likes
“But do not let us flatter ourselves. Do not let us, in all the pomp and circumstance of stately history, blind ourselves to the fact that the crimes of Frederick, or Napoleon, or their successors, are in essence no different from those of Sheppard or Peace. We must not imagine that the bad man who happens to offend against those particular laws which constitute the criminal code belongs to a peculiar or atavistic type, that he is a man set apart from the rest of his fellow-men by mental or physical peculiarities.” 0 likes
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