At the Mountains of Madness
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating

At the Mountains of Madness

by
4.02 of 5 stars 4.02  ·  rating details  ·  9,028 ratings  ·  646 reviews
Introduction by China Miéville

Long acknowledged as a master of nightmarish visions, H. P. Lovecraft established the genuineness and dignity of his own pioneering fiction in 1931 with his quintessential work of supernatural horror, At the Mountains of Madness. The deliberately told and increasingly chilling recollection of an Antarctic expedition's uncanny discoveries -- an...more
Paperback, definitive, 224 pages
Published June 14th 2005 by Modern Library (first published 1936)
more details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper LeePride and Prejudice by Jane Austen1984 by George OrwellThe Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. TolkienJane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë
1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die
223rd out of 1,304 books — 3,086 voters
Frankenstein by Mary ShelleyIt by Stephen KingCryonic by Travis BradberryDracula by Bram Stoker'Salem's Lot by Stephen King
Best Monster Books!
18th out of 289 books — 348 voters


More lists with this book...

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 3,000)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  rating details
Stephen
ATMOM intro

6.0 stars. As I was experiencing Lovecraft’s supremely awesome, nightmarish masterpiece, At the Mountains of Madness (ATMOM), it really struck me for the first time that he was a tremendously literate writer. I have been a fan of Lovecraft for a long time and have always been gaga for his bizarre imaginative stories. However, what jumped out at me on this reading of ATMOM was how impressively Lovecraft enhances the sense of dread that hangs over his stories through the colorful, melodramatic la...more
Forrest
This is as close as one will get to an epic adventure quest by H.P. Lovecraft. If you're an < a href="http://forrestaguirre.blogspot.com/20... role-playing game geek like me, this will appeal to the dungeoneer in you. Plenty of delving and mystery in this one!

If you're a fan of the movie Prometheus, you'd do well to hark back to the origin of many of the movie's tropes. They are similar, at least on the surface: An impossibly old alien race creates life on earth for the purpose of enslaving i...more
Jamie
never before has such an exciting story been told in such a dull way.
Erin
May 26, 2009 Erin rated it 2 of 5 stars
Shelves: 2009
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Jennifer
Imagine: Your friend goes to Antarctica with a team of scientists and discovers the remains of a before-the-dawn-of-time alien civilization AND then finds the ripped up bodies of some team members lying around AND then was chased by the lost alien forms. Cool. Except, your "friend" doesn't want to tell you about any of that. All he wants to do is describe the icy, mountainous, eerie, tunneled landscape that Roerich built:
So you're like, no, go back to the part about the ripped up bodies.

And he'...more
Sean
At the Mountains of Madness is a spine chilling story about an exploration team who travel to Antarctica to explore and collect various geological specimens. What they actually found was something far more mysterious and sinister.

In this short novel, one of the most impressive elements is the exceptional quality of Lovecraft’s writing. What he lacks in character development and plot, he more than makes up for in imagery and mood. The obvious omission of dialogue enhances the experiences and shi...more
Joseph Pinchback
Here's the thing about Lovecraft: he doesn't write great stories. People love the whole mythos thing, and I don't blame them, because the Lovecraftian mythos is awesome. But I don't particularly enjoy actually reading Lovecraft because his actual stories simply aren't very good. In this novel, for example, the story is basically a framework for him to do some world building. There's no real plot, character development, or dramatic tension. Lovecraft is clearly more concerned with building a hist...more
David
Mar 03, 2014 David rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition Recommends it for: Antarctic explorers, Old Ones, people who like "Happy Feet"
Either you dig Lovecraft or you don't. The guy had issues and his prose was the purplest, like most pulp writers of his time. But all American fantasy and horror written since the 1930s has been influenced by Lovecraft. Lovecraft himself was heavily influenced by others, of course, and At the Mountains of Madness, one of his most famous works, made explicit reference to Edgar Allen Poe's The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym.

This is a novella about a scientific expedition to Antarctica. The Antarct...more
Jesse Dixon
Tediously painful. So much detail, so little action, and almost no emotion in the book. The first sentence of chapter 6 'It would be cumbrous to give a detailed, consecutive account of our wanderings inside that cavernous, aeon-dead honeycomb of primal masonry' Unfortunately the rest of the book described the cumbrous, detailed, consecutive account of their wonderings inside the cavernous, aeon-dead honeycomb of primal masonry. I found the writing too dry and dull.

This is a summary of the whole...more
Silvia Chenault
Jul 07, 2007 Silvia Chenault rated it 5 of 5 stars Recommends it for: chill seekers
Shelves: classics, fiction, horror
This is my first taste of Lovecraft and I am hooked. This story takes place in the Antarctic and the story is told by a unnamed geologist who is part of an expedition team. They split into two teams, one stays at the base camp (the narrator being part of that team), and the other team flies through the harsh weather to higher ground.

The later team finds an undiscovered range of mountains that send awe and fear through the men. Their plane fails and they make an emergency landing among these mon...more
Oscar
Hace unos veinte años que leí 'En las montañas de la locura' por primera vez y la verdad es que mis recuerdos eran bastante vagos al respecto, por no decir casi nulos. Mi memoria no es demasiado mala, pero con los libros y del tema del que tratan, olvido muy rápido, algo que no sé si es bueno o malo en este caso. Y es que si tuviese que hacer memoria sobre un libro en concreto ahora mismo, dudo que pudiese dar apenas un mínimo retazo sobre argumento y personajes. Y es que son tantos los libros y...more
John
Some quickly jotted down thoughts after finishing Madness...

At the Mountains of Madness works surprisingly well as SF rather than horror or fantasy or weird tale, though it is all of those things.

The focus is heavily on the science (as Lovecraft understood it, of course) and on reason and on the limits of the same when our faculties are challenged and our certainties are undermined.

After reading At the Mountains of Madness, I'm not sure whether Lovecraft has any room for the "supernatural" at al...more
Evan Leach
”In the whole spectacle there was a persistent, pervasive hint of stupendous secrecy and potential revelation; as if these stark, nightmare spires marked the pylons of a frightful gateway into forbidden spheres of dream, and complex gulfs of remote time, space, and ultra-dimensionality. I could not help feeling that they were evil things—mountains of madness whose farther slopes looked out over some accursed ultimate abyss.”

img: Antarctica

H.P. Lovecraft’s tale of antarctic adventure is widely considered one of...more
Teresa
Este pequeno romance relata uma expedição à Antárctica, onde um grupo de cientistas se depara com vestígios de uma civilização desaparecida – Os Antigos, que existiram no princípio da Terra – e o que levou à sua extinção.

Um livro estranho!
Enquanto o lia cansou-me um pouco, no entanto, após o terminar dei por mim a reler certas partes.
Não me assustou enquanto o li. Fiquei assustada após o terminar, quando reli o prefácio de Clara Pinto Correia.

Um romance imprescindível para os apreciadores de fic...more
Hadrian
Boo!

(view spoiler)
Jamil
from the China Miéville introduction:

"Lovecraft's is not a fiction of carefully structured plot so much as of ineluctable unfolding: it is a literature of the inevitability of weird.
"'My reason for writing stories,' Lovecraft says, 'is to give myself the satisfaction of wonder, beauty, and adventurous expectancy...' Story is not the point: the point is wonder, which for Lovecraft goes hand in hand with horror, because, he claims, 'fear is our deepest and strongest emotion.'
"He believes this be...more
Ben Babcock
I will be brief, since I don't read much horror and am generally ignorant of Lovecraft's work, so I won't try to make a general statement based on this one story.

At the Mountains of Madness itself was OK, not great. Lovecraft is far more concerned with describing the extinct society of the Old Ones and their struggles with surviving Earth than injecting genuine dread into the story. It left little impression on me.

I liked the introduction by China Miéville better than the actual story. Likewise,...more
Daniel
I have finally read Lovecraft, and must admit it was worth the effort. There were so many Eureka moments where connections to literature both before and after clicked into place. It became increasingly obvious to me why Lovecraft is considered such an influential and pivotal author in certain circles. Just as you could look at a faded picture and see marked similarities between a grandfather and his living progeny, so too the influence of Lovecraft on authors like Gaiman and Mieville is blinding...more
Banner
This was my first Lovecraft. (That I remember). It seems highly improbable that as much pulp and science fiction that I read as a kid that I have not read one of his stories. However I enjoyed this and plan to read more. His style has that Victoria feel without all the emotional drama (a little drama). He does remind me of the masters of the past and rightly belongs on the same shelve.

After the briefest introduction with a promise of horror to come this read like a scientific travel journal thro...more
Petertpc
I don't know why I have never read H.P. Lovecraft before but I absolutely loved this book. I loved the writing style, the mythology, the descriptions and the story itself. This is a new favorite author of mine and I seriously recommend that everyone read this guy.
Kibisis
Una ricerca continua. Col pretesto di una spedizione in Antartico Lovecraft ci accompagna negli angoli più angusti e inesplorati della coscienza umana. Si scende in luoghi oscuri... "Avevano scoperto una caverna. All'inizio della perforazione, l'arenaria aveva ceduto il posto a una venatura di calcare comancico, pieno di minuti cefalopodi fossili, coralli, echinoidi e spirifere, più qualche sporadica traccia di di spugna silicea e di ossa di vertebrati marini, quest'ultime probabilmente di teleo...more
Lorina Stephens
I’ve come to H.P. Lovecraft (1890 to 1937) rather late, driven to his work by a colleague who insisted my own writing style mirrored Lovecraft’s.

The novella in question, At the Mountains of Madness, ranks among the elite of the pioneering cannon of horror literature, and indeed Lovecraft is said to be the inspiration behind such modern day horror-writing greats as Stephen King.

At the heart of this story is the discovery of a race of aliens so ancient it belies belief, by a group of scientists w...more
Seth Madej
I can't quite figure out why so many people consider At the Mountains of Madness to be H.P. Lovecraft's masterpiece when it's such an overstuffed and under-warmed reheating of what he did so well in his short stories. This novella is just a modified haunted-house story: some busybodies explore a creepy pad and discover it possessed by something scary. Except in this case the busybodies beat feet as soon as the frightening thing pops into view, so really At the Mountains of Madness is more like a...more
Linda
An expedition is sent to the Antarctic region to bore for samples deep in the ice with a newly developed equipment. When there, they split up and one of the teams makes a tremendous scientific discovery, before radio contact is suddenly broken. The main character, William Dyer, is worried and fly over to the other camp, with his comrade Danforth to investigate what happened, and the sight which greets them is total madness.


Spoilers!

Dyer wasn't especially well developed and I didn't get the feeli...more
Michael
I've been aware of Lovecraft as a cultural phenomenon for quite some time - as a meme, the ideas of Chthulu and the Old Ones, and the Lovecraftian conception of madness, have been kicking around the internet for years now, so I decided to pop into the actual source text to see what the fuss was about.

I found Lovecraft, as a writer, to do so many things that writers today are trained not to do. I don't, for instance, believe there is a single line of narrative dialog uttered in this book. The pe...more
Andrew Hill
What a great story. A scientist discovers an ancient and unnameable evil buried in the Antarctic. It is a setup familiar to anyone who has read Campbell's "Who Goes There?" (or seen the two very good movies based on that story), but Lovecraft's approach is both more subtle and more broad. The drama of the story does not come from confronting or overcoming a specific threat. Instead, it is built up through discovery--almost pure exposition, in much the same way that Arthur C. Clarke uses discover...more
Henry Avila
William Dyer, is the leader of a scientific expedition,(set in the early 1930's )from Miskatonic University,what you never heard of it!Researching the Antarctic continent, in the summer time, when temperatures soar above zero Fahrenheit.Everythings going well,they even find the tallest mountains on Earth.But while a group is digging under the ice, they discover a strange organism ,is it animal or vegetable?The sled dogs don't like it and are later proven correct, in their feelings.These are Alie...more
Stacia
Up to now, I had avoided reading (or in this case, listening to) Lovecraft, mainly because I thought he probably fell into the 'cheesy' &/or grisly horror genre. True, he writes horror, but I was very pleasantly surprised at how erudite his writing is. I know he is traditionally well-loved among geeky circles & now I see why -- his writing is smart, filled with scientific references (making the horror of his stories seem scientifically-authenticated), & quite compelling. I thoroughly...more
Claudia Piña
Decir todo lo que esta mal de este libro es básicamente describir el estilo de Lovecraft. Ya sabemos que hay prosa púrpura, ya sabemos que no suele respetar esa bella regla del show, don't tell. Ya sabemos que leer a Lovecraft da un poquito de dolor de cabeza, en especial a personas poco pacientes.

Sin embargo, suele valer la pena. Lovecraft tiene la gracia de conocer miedos muy profundos, en especial el miedo a lo desconocido. No el miedo a subir la escalera a oscuras o a ver bajo la cama, esos...more
Stephen
Classic horror is a thing that I feel is lost on most audiences today. Too many times we equate horror with the latest PG-13 schlock full of mindless T&A and an 'in-your-face-grandma' soundtrack featuring the flavor of the weak in nu-metal. Torture porn and crappy remakes have become the bread and butter in which we attempt to scare ourselves.

But, my friends, true horror is not lost. It's merely lurking beneath the surface, ready to rise like Dread Cthulhu and wreak havoc on the lesser crea...more
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 99 100 next »
topics  posts  views  last activity   
Just Literature: At the Mountains of Madness 1 1 Apr 17, 2014 11:13AM  
Why didn't they radio from the plane? 1 8 Apr 15, 2014 08:26AM  
Eight Public Readings of ATMOM 1 14 Oct 02, 2013 08:56PM  
The Verge Book Club: Podcast: At the Mountains of Madness by H.P. Lovecraft 1 14 Apr 04, 2013 08:14AM  
  • Shadows over Innsmouth
  • At the Mountains of Madness: A Graphic Novel
  • The Great God Pan
  • The Willows
  • Songs of a Dead Dreamer
  • The House on the Borderland
  • One Lonely Night
  • Mulengro/romany Tale
  • The Mask of Cthulhu
  • The Savage Tales of Solomon Kane
  • New Cthulhu: The Recent Weird
  • The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket
  • The Dark Domain
  • Ghost Stories
  • The King in Yellow and Other Horror Stories
  • Ghost Stories of an Antiquary
  • The Children of Cthulhu: Chilling New Tales Inspired by H.P. Lovecraft
9494
Howard Phillips Lovecraft, of Providence, Rhode Island, was an American author of horror, fantasy and science fiction.

Lovecraft's major inspiration and invention was cosmic horror: life is incomprehensible to human minds and the universe is fundamentally alien. Those who genuinely reason, like his protagonists, gamble with sanity. Lovecraft has developed a cult following for his Cthulhu Mythos, a...more
More about H.P. Lovecraft...
The Best of H.P. Lovecraft: Bloodcurdling Tales of Horror and the Macabre The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories At the Mountains of Madness and Other Tales of Terror The Transition of H. P. Lovecraft: The Road to Madness The Case of Charles Dexter Ward

Share This Book

“I could not help feeling that they were evil things-- mountains of madness whose farther slopes looked out over some accursed ultimate abyss. That seething , half-luminous cloud-background held ineffable suggestions of a vague, ethereal beyondness far more than terrestrially spatial; and gave appalling reminders of the utter remoteness, separateness, desolation, and aeon-long death of this untrodden and unfathomed austral world.” 17 likes
“He had read much of things as they are, and talked with too many people. Well-meaning philosophers had taught him to look into the logical relations of things, and analyse the processes which shaped his thoughts and fancies. Wonder had gone away, and he had forgotten that all life is only a set of pictures in the brain, among which there is no difference betwixt those born of real things and those born of inward dreamings, and no cause to value the one above the other. Custom had dinned into his ears a superstitious reverence for that which tangibly and physically exists, and had made him secretly ashamed to dwell in visions. Wise men told him his simple fancies were inane and childish, and even more absurd because their actors persist in fancying them full of meaning and purpose as the blind cosmos grinds aimlessly on from nothing to something and from something back to nothing again, neither heeding nor knowing the wishes or existence of the minds that flicker for a second now and then in the darkness” 6 likes
More quotes…