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The Free Sea

3.94  ·  Rating Details  ·  31 Ratings  ·  3 Reviews
The freedom of the oceans of the world and coastal waters has been a contentious issue in international law for the past four hundred years. The most influential argument in favor of freedom of navigation, trade, and fishing was that put forth by the Dutch theorist Hugo Grotius in his 1609 Mare Liberum ( The Free Sea ).

The Free Sea was originally published in order to bu
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Paperback, 170 pages
Published March 1st 2004 by Liberty Fund Inc. (first published 1609)
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Josh
May 15, 2014 Josh rated it liked it
i'm amazed anyone gave it more than three stars. this is one of those had to reads, but yeah it gives a good sense of how imperial international law really was / is.
Matthew Raketti
Jan 01, 2016 Matthew Raketti rated it it was amazing
Great book. Enjoyed it for the historical content; enjoyed it even more for its demonstration of excellence in legal argumentation.
Jonathan
Nov 21, 2009 Jonathan added it
Shelves: political, science
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Hugo Grotius (1583–1645) [Hugo, Huigh or Hugeianus de Groot] was a towering figure in philosophy, political theory, law and associated fields during the seventeenth century and for hundreds of years afterwards. His work ranged over a wide array of topics, though he is best known to philosophers today for his contributions to the natural law theories of normativity which emerged in the later mediev ...more
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“There is none of you who would not publicly exclaim that everyone should be moderator and arbitrator in his own matter, who would not command all citizens to use rivers and public places equally and indifferently, who would not with all his power defend the liberty of going hither and thither and trading.” 1 likes
“It is no less ancient than a pestilent error wherewith many men (but they chiefly who abound in power and riches) persuade themselves, or (as I think more truly) go about to persuade, that right and wrong are distinguished not according to their own nature but by a certain vain opinion and custom of men.” 0 likes
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