The Gods Are Not To Blame
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The Gods Are Not To Blame

4.12 of 5 stars 4.12  ·  rating details  ·  154 ratings  ·  23 reviews
The Gods Are Not To Blame: Classical Analogy on the Post-colonial Stage
Samenvatting-Eng The proposed research focuses on the use of classical analogy in post-colonial dramatic texts from Ireland, South Africa, Nigeria and the West Indies. By way of a comparative study Weyenberg aims to identify the factors that determine whether or not a playwright, in appropriating Greek...more
Hardcover, 72 pages
Published January 1st 1971 by Oxford University Press, USA
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Adeola
May 30, 2007 Adeola added it
Recommends it for: all English student.
The Summary of the Gods are to blame is about boy who was born and was fore seen to end up killing his father as to marry his mother,but he wasn't aware of that fact,until he ended up killing his father in a bush part and married his own mother ,then calamity befell the village ,when he became the king and all his children fell sick at the verge of dieing.
Esther
"It is always best to keep your words soft and sweet, you might never know when you'd have to eat them"

Odewale's tragic end might have been saved if only he let go off his pride.
Uche Stella
Nov 27, 2010 Uche Stella marked it as to-read
I believe the problem of man is with man himself.The fact that odewale aided the people of kutuje,was not a prove of leadership mandate.The tragedy that befell kutuje people took its turn after the coronation of odewale as king by either Odewale or the people, without consulting the gods.In our days we make same conclusions when we make people who have helped us come through storms as Lord over our affairs.
Ojo Eunice
The Gods are not to be blame is a story of a mans fate. king odewale who told will kil his father to marry his mother, in his attempt to run away from this to happen, ran to fulfil it. the gods are not to blame, because they have spoken and it is left for the subject to obey. if Gbonka had killed him in the bush as an infant, the curse would have been averted.
Edmund
"The Gods Are Not To Blame" is Ola Rotimi's retelling of Sophocles' "Oedipus The King" using a traditional African setting and characters. It was through this book that I first became acquainted with Oedipus' tale. What really stricks me about this book now is the title Rotimi chose.

Rotimi's tale, like that of Sophocles, is about a man's struggle to avert his fate, and unfortunately, in the process, actually helps to bring about its fulfillment. That is why "The Gods Are Not To Blame."
Victoria
Oct 22, 2008 Victoria is currently reading it  ·  review of another edition
that we shld not let our temper let us into other bad things that we are going to regret later in the future because it is going to affect us very badly like Odewale's temper lead him to his grave that should not happen to any reasonable humanbeign who have consience.
Sadiq
a very interesting novel, a story of a man who killed his father and married his mother, this is something which does not happen very often.
Shafaat Abubakar
this book is very interesting i will encourage every one to read it
Ifeoma
Would have been a five if not that the ending wrenched my heart.
But beautiful, beautiful twists I didn't see coming.
Bright
Mar 11, 2012 Bright rated it 3 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: Everybody who likes Novels.
Recommended to Bright by: My High School.
This is my most favorite book in my literature class in High School.
Though it portrays the African Traditions, there is a lot to learn from irrespective of whom you are and where you come from. "Kola nut indeed, last longer in the mouth of the one who cherish it".
- From the book 'The Gods are not to Blame.
Hassan Mohammed
This is one of my all time bests.Dissected this book cover to cover many times in high school.An interesting transposition of the greek classic oedipus rex of Sophocles in typical African style.Rich in wise sayings typical of Africa and very strong as a debate topic.Strongly worth the read!!
Ama
ola Rotimi's book is very inspiring.i learnt that what we say,do,watch,portray and everything else around us determines our destiny.trully the gods are not to blame for whatever happens.I believe odewale's fate would have been averted if he had stayed with his real parents.
Omoropo Odunlade
Jun 19, 2007 Omoropo Odunlade rated it 5 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: ANYONE THAT LIKE DRAMA NOVELS
Shelves: booksiveread
I LEARN ONE BASIC DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE AFRICAN TRADITIONAL NORMS AND THAT OF THE WESTERN WORLD WHICH IS AFRICANS BELIEVE THAT ONES DESTINY IS DECIDED BY THE GODS BUT THE WESTERNERS BELIEVE YOU MAKE YOUR OWN DESTINY WHICH I BELIEVE IS TRUE.
Deprofeci
Jan 18, 2014 Deprofeci marked it as to-read
reading
Osifade Jide
Aug 31, 2007 Osifade Jide added it
Recommends it for: ibkosifade@yahoo.com
i learned that the issue of generation curse is a strong issues
Machieng Chan
The play is very rich with oral traditions.
Douglas
i like odewales bravery and hot temper.
Alice Taiwo
D gods re 2 blamed....
Betty-ann Ananeh-frempong
Full of humour and ironies!! But personally I believe the gods are to blame. Once the prophesy was made, Human actions ensured it came to pass!
Selassie Mensah
IT WAS A COOL BOOK. I ENJOYED IT SO MUCH THAT I READ IT OVER AND OVER AGAIN!
Dickson
WELL AM NEVER GOING TO THINK WITH MY HEART FROM NOW ONWARDS AND THATS A PROMISE
Abujalaal Olalekan
i want to read the gods are not to blame by olarotimi
Nmayen
May 11, 2010 Nmayen added it
literature
Momobi1990
Apr 06, 2013 Momobi1990 added it
Shelves: zdczd
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Jo Silva achada batalha
Jo Silva achada batalha marked it as to-read
Jul 30, 2014
Michael Asante
Michael Asante marked it as to-read
Jul 30, 2014
Abu
Abu marked it as to-read
Jul 30, 2014
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who is to blame in ola rotimis the gods are not to blame 8 97 Sep 23, 2013 07:15AM  
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