Through a Howling Wilderness: Benedict Arnold's March to Quebec, 1775
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Through a Howling Wilderness: Benedict Arnold's March to Quebec, 1775

3.86 of 5 stars 3.86  ·  rating details  ·  63 ratings  ·  17 reviews
Before Benedict Arnold was branded a traitor, he was one of the colonies' most valuable leaders. In September 1775, eleven hundred soldiers boarded ships in Massachusetts, bound for the Maine wilderness. They had volunteered for a secret mission, under Arnold's command to march and paddle nearly two hundred miles and seize British Quebec. Before they reached the Canadian b...more
Paperback, 256 pages
Published November 13th 2007 by St. Martin's Griffin (first published 2005)
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Dave Goldberg
Apr 22, 2008 Dave Goldberg rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition Recommends it for: American Revolutionophiles
I enjoyed this shortish book. As opposed to some of the other accounts I've read, this book keeps a strict focus on Arnold's expedition through Maine, the siege of Quebec, and its ultimate failure. Desjardin makes extensive use of officers' journals, and other participants accounts to provide a living picture of the miserable adventure that Arnold and his men undertook in an attempt to capture Canada at the dawn of the American Revolution.
Interesting is the epilogue where Desjardin muses over th...more
Jerome
A pretty good book about a more obscure part of our Revolutionary War.The Quebec invasion was actually an expedition at first and then a battle, and while Desjardin's handling of the battle is well written, his account of the expedition is sometimes dull and tedious and tends to bog down like the quagmire that he is describing. But, in all, I enjoyed the book. The book is very well researched, so much so that at some points it seems as if Desjardin wrote the story around the quotes, rather than...more
Glenda
Nov 22, 2008 Glenda is currently reading it  ·  review of another edition
still listening. Terrible fate of most of the soldiers, the painful trek with little to no food, shelter or clothing and I believe the battle was lost, anyway. Had they won, Quebec may have become the 14th colony. Bonjour.
Nancy
Oct 21, 2009 Nancy rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition Recommends it for: Anyone interested in the early days of this country and of the "founding parents."
Shelves: history, non-fiction
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Brian
Through a Howling Wilderness s is a straightforward account of the invasion of Canada conducted by the forces of the American Revolution. This was a multi-front assault on the city of Quebec and this book details Benedicts Arnold assault through the wilderness of Maine. Desjardin (who is primarily a historian of all things Maine) does an admirable job of putting the reader in the place of these troops as the trekked through snow, up mountains and wadded across near frozen rivers to their miracul...more
Patience Thomas
Through a Howling Wilderness by Thomas A. Desjardin is a thoroughly researched historical depiction of the harrowing march of Benedict Arnold's to Quebec in 1775. It is of particular interest as it takes the reader through Maine which at the time was part of Massachusetts. One can picture the trials and tribulations even more given the topography of the state. Seemingly insurmountable rigors were endured by these farmer colonialists. Not only did they have to haul and portage bateaux made of gre...more
Tom Darrow
A good book about a little known, yet very important campaign. In the early stages of the revolution, the American colonies created an ambitious plan to win the Canadian colonies over to their cause and potentially land a knock-out blow against the British. The campaign ran in to trouble from the beginning, getting delayed by weather. Later, the soldiers had to march across hundreds of miles of poorly mapped Maine marsh and forest before attacking the fortress city of Quebec in the middle of win...more
Chris
A book that tells you everything you wanted to know about a mission that could have changed history and nobody knows about it. It came so close to succeeding. Arnold was truly a phenomenal individual and it's sort of sad he is only remembered for being a traitor. He was instrumental in planning and executing this mission to capture Quebec and later with naval forces on Lake Champlain he delayed the British invasion. At Saratoga he was wounded and perhaps turned the tide in the battle by his atta...more
Rob
Though most of our schools focus on Benedict Arnold's actions as a traitor later in the American Revolutionary War, his expedition to capture Quebec, though a failure, is full of determination, insight, and struggles with supply and personnel logistics and moral of the soldiers across a desolate region of the northeast and Canada. The most interesting part of the book is the struggle of Arnold's men in getting from the American colonies to Quebec, which is also the largest portion of the book, t...more
J
If you've ever been hiking or camping in the Maine woods, you'll have a beginning of an understanding of what Benedict Arnold and his men went through on their famous march to Quebec. What they endured, though, was almost unendurable. Yet most of them survived to make it to Canada and one of the first campaigns of the American Revolution. A gripping story full of places and names most of us have heard of.
Lloyd Mustafa
A wonderful account of the harrowing attack on Quebec by Benedict Arnold during the American Revolution. Bold and fearless in battle and campaign, Arnold was more than his two-dimensional image as a traitor. Above all this is a story of human survival on an unbelievably harsh journey.
Bev
This was a very good history but I found it a little tedious at times, especially after they had finished the amazing and terrible march. Would make a great movie but one that only history buffs would want to see, since it wouldn't end with the crowds cheering.
Guy
I learned that I would probably not have done well on with Arnold's troops. A physically brutal trek, and a solid retelling of the event.
Claudette
Quite well written and a fascinating look at Benedict Arnold and his leadership skills before he became a traitor to the American cause.
Yvonne Carter
Benedict Arnold's expedition in 1775 from Maine to attack Quebec. Their trials on the way up and attacking, and the misfortunes.
Beakerkin
One should read this book before reading Arundel by Kenneth Roberts. It is short and well written and entertaining.
David Fiske
Easy to read. Offers some new information on the expedition.
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