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Turning Around the Mainline: How Renewal Movements Are Changing the Church
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Turning Around the Mainline: How Renewal Movements Are Changing the Church

3.17  ·  Rating Details  ·  12 Ratings  ·  2 Reviews
Brings together an introduction to the issues, themes, and documents of the mainline churches and renewal movements, and a practical case study of the relevant issue of the day: the property rights of churches. This study is suitable for pastors, church leaders, and those wanting a better understanding of the changing dynamics of evangelicalism.
Paperback, 270 pages
Published February 1st 2006 by Baker Books
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Alex Stroshine
Aug 05, 2016 Alex Stroshine rated it liked it
Shelves: christian-living
More like a 2.5/5.

The best part of this book was Thomas Oden's impassioned plea for orthodox believers in mainline churches to remain and reform their communions. He declares “confessing Christians seek to maintain the unity of the church through discipline, not through division…Those who split off leave the patient in the hands of the euthanasia advocates, the Kevorkians of dying modernity. The Holy Spirit will not bless willful unnecessary divisiveness…It seems unthinkable to abandon, without
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David Hardin
May 28, 2013 David Hardin rated it really liked it
Really interesting. Would have enjoyed more stats etc. behind his findings.
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Thomas C. Oden (Ph.D., Yale University), formerly Henry Anson Buttz Professor of Theology at The Theological School of Drew University in Madison, New Jersey, is now director of the Center for Early African Christianity, at Eastern University, St. Davids, Pennsylvania. He is the general editor of the Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture and the Ancient Christian Doctrine series as well as the ...more
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“Modern ecumenism rightly began in mission, but then lapsed into a merger mentality, then defensive bureaucracy, and finally into unrepresentative forms of extreme politicization.” 0 likes
“Cultural relativism has used this deceit to gain power. The absolute relativists want to assert their sincere desire for dialogue UNTIL they become a majority. Then they often want to settle issues by either exclusion or coercion. They first argue for democratic fairness, but when they acquire their majority, they are tempted to turn immediately to a triumphalism that assumes that liberal justice has triumphed. From then on, dialogue about truth is forbidden, and about absolute truth is absolutely forbidden.” 0 likes
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