The Professor
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The Professor

3.52 of 5 stars 3.52  ·  rating details  ·  8,185 ratings  ·  365 reviews
The Professor is Charlotte Brontës first novel, in which she audaciously inhabits the voice and consciousness of a man, William Crimsworth. Like Jane Eyre he is parentless; like Lucy Snowe in Villette he leaves the certainties of England to forge a life in Brussels. But as a man, William has freedom of action, and as a writer Brontë is correspondingly liberated, exploring...more
Hardcover, 269 pages
Published May 1999 by North Books (first published 1857)
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Jane Eyre by Charlotte BrontëWuthering Heights by Emily BrontëThe Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne BrontëVillette by Charlotte BrontëAgnes Grey by Anne Brontë
Best of Brontë
6th out of 17 books — 269 voters
Jane Eyre by Charlotte BrontëWuthering Heights by Emily BrontëThe Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar WildeDracula by Bram StokerGreat Expectations by Charles Dickens
Victorian novels
54th out of 185 books — 275 voters


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La Petite Américaine
Sep 05, 2008 La Petite Américaine rated it 5 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: Bronte/du Maurier/Byatt Fans
Every time I finish a Charlotte Bronte novel, my heart pounds and my mind is disoriented. After reaching the end of her stories, closing her pages for the last time, and remembering the long passages written out in long-hand, it's all like slowly surfacing from the depths of another world, and you're back home in reality, not quite sure you want to be there.

Although it doesn't have the exquisite tragedy of Villette or the kick-ass karate-chop combos of romance, ghosts, crazy ladies in the attic...more
Paul
Very early effort which reads like a practice run for later novels like Villette and Jane Eyre (which reminds me, I must read Villette again). It is an engaging first person narrative in which William Crimsworth describes his young adulthood and his attempts to earn his living.

We learn about his grim family and Bronte uses her experience teaching in Brussels when Crimsworth moves there to teach. Most of the novel revolves around Brussels and the world of the small teaching establishments. The no...more
Skylar Burris
What if Jane Eyre had been written from the point of view of Rochester? Would he have seemed more manipulative, more self-centered? Would readers have allowed themselves to be swept away by Jane's passion, and to desire its fruition? In The Professor, Charlotte Bronte narrates the tale from the viewpoint of the male protagonist, and I must confess to finding him frequently unsympathetic. Without seeing this character from the eyes of his affection's object, it is difficult to appreciate him. He...more
Dolors
The first novel by Charlotte Brontë, though not published until her death. It has been reviewed as a simple, unimaginative portrait of an English teacher's life in Brussels, an early attempt to what her best known novel Villette would later become.
I don't agree.
This work shines in itself, it's the only story in which Charlotte dares to talk through a man's voice. She talks about responsibility, about earning your own success through effort and sacrifice, to defy the strict clichés and the hypocr...more
Joseph
My first Charlotte Bronte book and again I wonder how I could have missed this book or ignored this author for so long. Although Anne is still my favorite in the early part of my reading, Charlotte's The Professor follows the same form of story telling. The major characters are well developed and likable or unlikable as the case maybe. Minor characters are not developed, such as William's friend Charles.

William is the main character, an Englishman with an education who rejecting going into the c...more
Keely
This book starts off promisingly enough, but as the character grows less sympathetic and the plot draws out predictably, much of the charm is lost. Perhaps it was not unexpected that I would be drawn into the plight of a young, educated man thrust out alone into the world with no prospects, forced to work pointless jobs for frustratingly inept employers for subsistence. It mirrors not only my experiences, but that of most of my generation.

Unfortunately, our narrator becomes a rather stuck-up pri...more
Bojan Gacic
How wonderful it is to see a woman writing from a male perspective, and doing so with such authority, that we can simply nod in approbation. ''The Professor'' belongs to, what I like to call, the ''Austen/Bronte'' literary club, therefore, if one has experienced a novel belonging to the before mentioned group of socially and emotionally oppressed women, he/she will have an inkling of what's to come.

''The Professor'', besides the male protagonist, bears few dissimilarities to its predecessors. Ap...more
Sparrow
Charlotte Bronte is such a self-righteous biotch.
Ulises
A ver, es lo primero que leo de la autora y la verdad es que tengo muchos sentimientos contradictorios. La trama es casi inexistente al menos hasta la mitad del libro e increíblemente tediosa, y a partir de cierto punto avanza demasiado rápido, aunque no voy a negar que se pone más interesante. Hay mucha arrogancia, prejuicios, racismo, una imagen no muy agradable de la mujer en general, sumisa y casi en eterna penitencia, una constante alabanza de lo británico al punto del fanatismo, falta de c...more
Chiara Pagliochini
«Cosa sapevo io del carattere femminile, prima dell’arrivo a Bruxelles? Veramente poco. E che idea ne avevo? Qualcosa di vago, leggero, trasparente, scintillante. Adesso, venutovi a contatto, trovavo che era una sostanza abbastanza palpabile. Anche molto dura, a volte, e spesso pesante. C’era metallo dentro: piombo e ferro.»

Potrei perdonare a Charlotte Brontё questo romanzo, se non avesse scritto Jane Eyre. Ma non posso tacere, non posso non indignarmi per il confronto ingrato e inevitabile.
Pot...more
Kristen
I decided to read Wuthering Heights, but it was not on the shelf, so I decided to take this one. It's a charming little book, if one overlooks the narrator's conviction that the shape of a person's head, face, and even body reveals their inner character; also his tendency to refer to different European nationalities as 'races' with easily identified (and always inferior to English) characteristics; and finally his seriously anti-Catholic attitude (and I'm not even Catholic!) - all of which in th...more
Simona
Ho deciso di leggere "Il professore", poiché durante il mio primo Club del Libro di Torino Stefanya ne ha parlato suscitando la mia curiosità e portandomi a leggerlo in contemporanea con Lucrezia.
Ammetto che non conoscevo affatto questo libro. Quando si parla delle sorelle Bronte, io penso immediatamente a "Cime tempestose" o a "Jane Eyre",le opere rispettivamente di Emily e Charlotte Bronte.
Leggere questo libro è stato una sorpresa. E' il primo libro scritto da Charlotte Bronte che fu critica...more
Lucrezia
Decisamente qui non siamo al livello di Jane Eyre. Ma Charlotte è Charlotte e si riconosce e anche questa volta mi ha tenuta incollata alla pagina fino alla fine. sono curiosissima di leggere anche Shirley e Vilette (quando si decideranno a ripubblicarle in Italia).

Ma passiamo al professore , prima prova letteraria di Charlotte, la ragazzina si dimostrava già tenutaria di un talento precoce, chapeu!
Tuttavia il protagonista non mi ha destato alcuna simpatia , e nemmeno alcun altro personaggio de...more
Lada
Why am I drawn to writing something about this sort of novels. Precisely because it demands no effort of writing. One writes it extremely fast and one book more among reviews. It is about the professor. So am I So are dear readers most probably yes. Intellectual so. You may be attracted to write youself. So is Charlotte Bronte, so is the Professor.An intellectual man making his living out of his brains, Other heroins do the same thing in the world of Charlotte Bronte. Difficult though. Demands a...more
Joana
"O professor" foi o primeiro romance escrito pela célebre escritora britânica Charlotte Bronte, publicado em 1857, sob um pseudónimo masculino.

Decidi "embarcar" neste romance pois pensei, inicialmente, que seria a obra perfeita para começar a ler Bronte. Sempre quis ler "Jane Eyre" e, como nunca tinha ouvido falar deste romance da autora, decidi descobrir por mim mesma e dar uma oportunidade a esta obra pouco divulgada.

Posso dizer-vos que gostei muito da história em si. Achei também curioso o li...more
Maria
Também aqui:

http://oimaginariodoslivros.blogspot....

Gosto muito de ler romances, apesar de não ser o género que mais abunda na minha estante. Tenho sempre receio de apostar na leitura de romances, pois sei que é um género que eu gosto muito mas que nem sempre apresenta as características que eu mais aprecio neste género. Talvez por isso goste tanto de romance fantástico e romance histórico: não se resume a romance, mas com outros ingredientes para expandir a história e o ambiente. Quantas vezes...more
Eline
As a "Flamande" (to use the word Brontë seemed to like a lot) it was really strange to read a book written by Charlotte Brontë about a professor, named William Crimsworth, who came to BELGIUM to teach English. There was a long time I didn't even know this book existed. Until one day I discovered there's a Brontë-tour in Brussels (http://www.thebrusselsbrontegroup.org/) because Charlotte and her sister Emily visited our beautiful country with their father in 1842. They stayed in a Pensionnat for...more
Erin
From chapter to chapter, I vacillated between loving and hating this book. I'd recommend it if you can't find something better to read or if you're a completist with the need to read every Bronte novel. Otherwise, just skip it.

Things I loved:

-- The first-person perspective.
-- The focus on the reality of a need to earn a living. I think that modern readers may be able to relate to this better than to the many Victorian novels in which nobody seems to DO much of anything.
-- One character reminded...more
Jori Richardson
First of all, my reading of this book was not influenced by "Villette," and neither is this review. I have not, as of now, read that particular Bronte volume yet, so I will be reviewing this book without the comparison that I see most place on it.

"The Professor" is about the young man William Crimsworth, who eradicates himself from a job working at his arrogant brother's business and goes to Belgium to become a professor. There, he meets Zoraide Reuter, the headmistress of the school, a woman wh...more
Furqan
This was Charlotte Bronte's first novel and certainly not one of her finest works. I can see why it was rejected by the publishers several times and was only published posthumously. The novel is narrated in first person by the protagonist, William Crimsworth. It is partly set in a fictional town of Yorkshire and the rest in the city of Brussels, Belgium.

The story has a promising start, but plunges into monotony as it progresses. The protagonist's opinion of the inhabitants of Brussels makes a re...more
Karen Powell
This novel appears to be the precursor to "Villette," using a similar plot, but using a male voice as the narrator. The male is William Crimsworth, orphaned by poor parents, but raised by wealthy relations with resentment on both sides. Soon as he is of age, William sets off to make it on his own, which neccessitates him going into - gasp!- trade, a horrifying word among the upper class. William seeks his long-lost older brother, who didn't have the benefit of their rich relatives' protection an...more
Sherien
I see this as an experimental novel. Well this is Charlotte Bronte’s first work and clearly I do not find it utterly satisfying compared to her other works especially 'Jane Eyre'. Charlotte Bronte seems to want to talk about many important and interesting things such as equality between men and women, caste, religion, love, nationality but somehow, she could not narrate it perfectly.

I have to say that the plot was kind of dull and predictable. I liked the idea about relationships going on betwe...more
Meghan
Sep 11, 2008 Meghan rated it 1 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: only the most die hard Bronte fans and even then with a disclaimer
Shelves: brit-lit
I finally got around to finished/re-reading "The Professor." As I re-read it I remember why I hadn't finished for class when I first started reading it.

There is a lot of superfluous attempts at developing plot. The actual plot does not start up until half way through the book.

There are copious amounts of French (entire dialogues) which are not translated either by the author or by the editor (of the Oxford edition at least).

It is clear to me why this book was never published during Charlotte...more
Geetika
Yes!!!!!!!!!! I did it... this is what i feel when i was finally able to finish it up, a novel from Classic genre. I am from quite a long time was trying to read up some classic and picked up this book.

Now, the book review .....
The book is about a self-made man William Crimsworth and how he struggles to get for himself, the right wife, the right job and right everything. I mean the protagonist is obsessive about being his own self-righteousness.

There are some irritating points about the novel...more
Lisa
Bronte's first novel, initially rejected for publication and later published posthumously by her husband. It felt like she was trying to write as a man for a predominantly male audience without full insight into what it felt like to be male. I love her style, although in this novel it has yet to be perfected. The protagonist was, to me, too pompous and prejudicial to be someone who I could empathize with.

Bronte herself did not attempt to have this novel published a second time and even used part...more
Laura
Opening lines:
THE other day, in looking over my papers, I found in my desk the following copy of a letter, sent by me a year since to an old school acquaintance:—
"DEAR CHARLES,
"I think when you and I were at Eton together, we were neither of us what could be called popular characters: you were a sarcastic, observant, shrewd, cold-blooded creature; my own portrait I will not attempt to draw, but I cannot recollect that it was a strikingly attractive one—can you?

Free download available at Project...more
Ishmael
“The Professor” is in many ways the concentration of Brontë, C's chief art; it demonstrates that she could be really quite tedious even in fewer than 300 pages.

We always have to give books of the Victorian era some licence. The contemporary reader might raise an eyebrow when a phrase such as “rich as a Jew” crops up in a text, wince at the ingrained sexism of the time, or gloss over a wicked character described as dark-skinned or looking suspiciously like a gypsy (Hello, Brontë, E!), but we tend...more
Amerynth
Charlotte Bronte made several unsuccessful attempts to have "The Professor," her earliest work published. I can see why it was only published after her death (and numerous rewrites) as it really isn't a great novel.

The story follows William Crimsworth, a man (like her female characters) who is thrown to the wild and forced to find his own fortune. He becomes a teacher in Brussels and the plot moves on from there.

It really takes a long time for the book to get going -- her long blocks of descript...more
Heidi
These are the things I liked about this novel by Charlotte Bronte:
*I liked her preface that states she intended to write about a working man instead of a wealthy one; there would be no woman of fortune to marry for him. And she kept to her word. I liked that.
* There were some really nice moments of character exploration, especially in the Belgian headmistress.
* I loved that it was written from the point of view of a man. I would've liked more insight into his thoughts.

These are the things that w...more
Trevor Kidd
The Professor was Charlotte Brontë's first novel, and honestly it isn't nearly as magical as Jane Eyre or Villette. In fact, Charlotte Brontë reworked some of the material from The Professor into Villette, especially thematic material regarding being a teacher in Belgium. I recommend reading Villette before The Professor so that you can see the magic of the former and then see the latter as a step in Brontë's development as a novelist.

The most obvious thing missing from The Professor is the stro...more
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topics  posts  views  last activity   
Victorians!: The Professor - chs. XXII - XXV (end) 15 44 Jun 09, 2014 09:47PM  
Online source for English translation of French passages? 1 4 May 06, 2014 02:33AM  
Victorians!: The Professor - chs. XVI - XXI 29 34 Nov 16, 2013 06:54PM  
Victorians!: The Professor - chs. VIII - XV 21 29 Nov 01, 2013 01:44PM  
Victorians!: * The Professor - discussion schedule 16 63 Oct 31, 2013 08:20AM  
Victorians!: The Professor - Preface & chs. I - VII 19 46 Oct 22, 2013 05:53PM  
The Brontë Family: The Professor (1857) 1 7 Dec 30, 2011 10:25AM  
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1036615
Charlotte Brontë was a British novelist, the eldest out of the three famous Brontë sisters whose novels have become standards of English literature. See also Emily Brontë and Anne Brontë.

Charlotte Brontë was born in Thornton, Yorkshire, England, the third of six children, to Patrick Brontë (formerly "Patrick Brunty"), an Irish Anglican clergyman, and his wife, Maria Branwell. In April 1820 the fam...more
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“I sought her eye, desirous to read there the intelligence which I could not discern in her face or hear in her conversation; it was merry, rather small; by turns I saw vivacity, vanity, coquetry, look out through its irid, but I watched in vain for a glimpse of soul. I am no Oriental; white necks, carmine lips and cheeks, clusters of bright curls, do not suffice for me without that Promethean spark which will live after the roses and lilies are faded, the burnished hair grown grey. In sunshine, in prosperity, the flowers are very well; but how many wet days are there in life--November seasons of disaster, when a man's hearth and home would be cold indeed, without the clear, cheering gleam of intellect.” 19 likes
“You know full well as I do the value of sisters' affections: There is nothing like it in this world.” 18 likes
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