Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Krazy Kat: The Comic Art of George Herriman” as Want to Read:
Krazy Kat: The Comic Art of George Herriman
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Krazy Kat: The Comic Art of George Herriman

4.36 of 5 stars 4.36  ·  rating details  ·  584 ratings  ·  25 reviews
Krazy Kat, created by George Herriman, made its debut in 1913. During its 31 year run, it was enormously popular with the public and with many writers, artists, and intellectuals of the time. An innovative cartoon masterpiece and the first major biographical work on the artist himself.
Paperback, 224 pages
Published September 1st 2004 by Abrams (first published 1975)
more details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about Krazy Kat, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about Krazy Kat

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 990)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  rating details
David Schaafsma
This book is great, especially for the student of comics history, interested in comics origins. Herriman is one of the greats, one you have to know, who did a lot of comics over the years, but is best known for Krazy Kat, begun as a strip in 1913, and championed and funded by no less a comics sugar daddy than William Randolph Hearst (yes, the tyrant loved comics and insisted on them in all his syndicated newspapers, so a few comics artists and cartoonists made a living with his support for decad ...more
In my eyes, Krazy Kat is best appreciated as an art history text rather than as a source of entertainment.

Don't get me wrong, the slapstick imagery of an embittered mouse repeatedly lobbing a brick at a dopey cat's head never really gets old. I also can't even properly comprehend Herriman's influence in the realm of comics, as he was clearly an incredibly ambitious artist. His early experimentation with landscapes and layouts was groundbreaking and lighthearted.

But outside of 'appreciating' Kra
Peter D.j.
For years and years, I dismissed "Krazy Kat" as just strange and limited. However, the more I heard the raves from others, the more curious I became. "What am I missing?" Being on a stretch of reading comics lately (and one often leads to another!) I grabbed this collection. I just finished it, and yep, I quite liked it! It's fun to watch the basic plotline repeated again and again in increasingly absurd and poetic ways. I even got used to those unusual backgrounds. The way Herriman played with ...more
Ben Carlsen
I love George Herriman, and Krazy Kat especially. This book does a great job of chronicling Herriman's carreer, and is a great collection of Krazy Kat strips. There aren't a lot of Krazy Kat collections, which is sad. For those looking, this is a great place to start. I also enjoy that the part on Krazy Kat from "The Seven Lively Arts" is reprinted in full in this book.

Anyone looking for a great example of what comic strips have done and can do, and for a profile of one of the greatest cartoonis
Zero Jones
The story of a cats unrequited love for a mouse, but also so much more. It would have to be a work of genius to have remained popular for so long.
Berna Labourdette
En principio, resulta insólito. Hasta idiota. Una tira cómica que extiende hasta el infinito el eterno triángulo: porque A ama a B, B ama a C y C detesta a A y odia (aparentemente) a B. Pero en el universo singular y particular del nortemericano George Herriman (1880- 1944), esta aparente comida de errores se transforma en una obra delirante, divertida y profundamente crítica.

A es Pupp, un perro policía, un grave guardían de la ley y el orden, que está perdidamente enamorado de B, que es Kat, u
Here's a joke: a sadist, a masochist and a police officer are stuck in the middle of the desert. Ha ha ha ha!!! Peanuts is the same thing ("you're going to love this, it's about a depressed child who constantly fails at being better liked than his dog"), satire as a way of dealing with desires and emotions that might otherwise get overwhelming and cause real problems. I'll admit I'm one of these suckers who claims to be intellectual because I appreciate the deeper subtext of the comics I sit aro ...more
Love the art and often the writing, though it can be hard to follow.
Occasionally I become optimistic, usually when drunk, and feel at peace, fully integrated with my time. Then I sober up, read this book (preferably accompanied by Fletcher Henderson, or equivalent) and resolve once again: olde IS better.

A love sick cat pines after a sadistic mouse, whose repeated gifts of hurled bricks are interpreted as love notes. Charmingly drawn, literate, definitely NOT Cathy.

The problem with this book is the size of the reproductions-the comics are just too damn small and don't do justice to Herriman's work. The text is well written and thoughtful and tell his story wonderfully. I like the paper and the printing is nice, with the colors being vivid allowing for nice inspection of the strips. Too bad about the size, though.
Mike Jensen
It is difficult to say that this is a collection of Herriman's best strips, because so many others are as good. You can say that this collection is faultless and wonderful. This is an excellent introduction for those who do not get the Kat.
Frieda Vizel
Picked this up because I read in Bill Watterson's essays that he was most inspired by Krazy Kat. The text was fascinating but the strips were too small to enjoy. It's hard to find a decent reproduction of the Krazy Kat strip.
Another tangent to Ten-Cent Plague. I can see the influence on most of the current comics. Beyond the artistry, though, I found it annoying - Kat talks in dialect that almost takes translation to read.
Mike Jensen
Not just a reprint of selected KK strips, but with lots of commentary that puts Herriman's work into the context of his life. A bit dated now, this is still a marvelous book.
George Herriman's comic strip is the work of art that has stayed closest to my heart for the longest period of time.
Oct 02, 2009 Oriana marked it as to-read
Recommended to Oriana by: Kimley
Shelves: to-read-soon
I hear this is a good intro to one of the people I'm most ashamed to know nothing about.
I read this many, many years ago. It's an excellent introduction to his work.
I know it was a hugely influential comic, but it's just not very funny.
Nice artwork, but the print is a wee bit small, or rather very small at times.
Lots of great info on Herriman, and includes a lot of color strips.
Wonderful book about a great genius.
Public library copy.
I <3 krazy kat
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 32 33 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »
  • Little Nemo: 1905-1914
  • Popeye, Vol. 1: I Yam What I Yam!
  • Comic Art Propaganda: A Graphic History
  • Kirby: King of Comics
  • Walt and Skeezix, Vol. 1: 1921-1922
  • Pogo: The Complete Syndicated Comic Strips, Vol. 1: Through the Wild Blue Wonder
  • The Art of Harvey Kurtzman: The Mad Genius of Comics
  • Breakdowns: Portrait of the Artist as a Young %@&*!
  • Strange and Stranger: The World of Steve Ditko
  • Peanuts: The Art of Charles M. Schulz
  • Will Eisner: A Dreamer's Life in Comics
  • Secret Identity: The Fetish Art of Superman's Co-Creator
  • In the Studio: Visits with Contemporary Cartoonists
  • Cartooning: Philosophy and Practice
  • How To Make Webcomics
  • Graphic Storytelling and Visual Narrative
  • Mickey Mouse, Vol. 1: Race to Death Valley
  • Reinventing Comics: How Imagination and Technology Are Revolutionizing an Art Form
George Herriman was born August 2nd, 1880. He was an African-American cartoonist whose comic strip Krazy Kat has been said by many to be America’s greatest cartoon.

Herriman was born in New Orleans, but his Creole family soon moved to California. As a teenager, he contributed drawings to local newspapers. In his early 20s, he moved to New York City and freelanced until newspaper mogul William Rand
More about George Herriman...

Share This Book