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Dying for the Gods: Human Sacrifice in Iron Age & Roman Europe

4.25  ·  Rating Details ·  36 Ratings  ·  3 Reviews
Sacrifice, like death, is one of the great taboos of modern society. The notion that human sacrifice, and even cannibalism, could be considered a most holy act is almost inconceivable. Yet the evidence for human sacrifice in northwest Europe, deriving from both archaeology and the testimony of Classical writers of the first centuries BC and AD, has to be confronted. Profes ...more
Paperback, 240 pages
Published April 1st 2002 by Tempus
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Mjm
Mar 08, 2013 Mjm rated it it was amazing
This is an excellent resource for anyone making a study of human sacrifice in ancient times.Very well researched, this work is an important volume in my library, not least because it can draw on more recent archeological findings and anthropological interpretations. Previous scholarly works (i.e. trustworthy sources) are several decades removed from Aldhouse-Green's excellent study, and thus provide a less complete picture.
Old-Barbarossa
Jul 18, 2015 Old-Barbarossa rated it liked it
CSI: Iron Age.
Bit dry at times, very well illustrated, very good refs.
Not every body was found in a bog!
Plenty other odd finds.
This looks at an assortment of bodies, or parts, and tries to examine causes of death as well as the "why".
Despite the title of this text I'm left thinking that the reason for some of the deaths are as likely to be killings, judicial or otherwise, as they are to be ritual sacrifices.
If you're a Neo-pagan or Druid you should read it to see that your predecessors were not
...more
Maya
Oct 31, 2013 Maya rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: celtic-history
Please read my review at Celtic Scholar's Reviews and Opinions
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Miranda Green was born in London and educated at Greycoat Hospital, Westminster. She took an Honours degree at University College, Cardiff and an M. Litt. at Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford. She gained a research scholarship at the Open University and was awarded a doctorate in 1981 for her thesis on Romano-Celtic sun-symbolism. She has received research awards from the Society of Antiquities of London ...more
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