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The Robot Novels: The ...
 
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Isaac Asimov
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The Robot Novels: The Caves of Steel, The Naked Sun, The Robots of Dawn (Robot #1-3)

4.36 of 5 stars 4.36  ·  rating details  ·  1,730 ratings  ·  38 reviews
In The Caves of Steel, Isaac Asimov first introduced Elijah Baley and R. Daneel Olivaw, who would later become his favorite protagonists.

The book's central crime is a murder, which takes place before the novel opens. Roj Nemmenuh Sarton, a Spacer Ambassador, lives in Spacetown, the Spacer outpost just outside New York City. For some time, he has tried to convince the Ea...more
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Published 1988 by Del Rey (first published 1952)
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Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 2,219)
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Jan-Maat
This series combines Asimov's fondness for the locked room mystery and science fiction in an explicit way. The principal hero is Elijah Bailey, an everyday detective working in the city, yet who will also become the prophet of human exploration and settlement of the universe.

The basic set up of the series is that the population of Earth lives in huge covered cities, almost completely sealed off from the outside world. One character in The Caves of Steel has a window in his office which is consid...more
Joshua
One word, and one word only, need be used to succinctly describe Asimov's robot novels: Jehoshaphat! While I realize that the first two novels of this omnibus were written during a period of publishing history particularly rife with taboos, long since abandoned in more modern literature, the fact remains that Asimov could barely write more than two pages without using Elijah Baley's non-expletive. While I usually find Asimov's writing to be both quixotic and enjoyable, these three novels felt st...more
Derek Pennycuff
This was such a chore to read. And now I'm questioning everything. Chiefly why the hell Asimov built such a reputation after publishing stuff like this. To be fair, maybe I just can't appreciate it within the timeframe it was written. The portrayal of women in all three of these books, even the far more recent final volume, is deeply troubling to me. And I'm sure we wouldn't have character's like TNG's Data were it not for these books laying the ground work. But I feel a single Data focused epis...more
Molly G
Reread June - July 2010

Reread May 2009

Always forget what an engrossing read they are.

Currently also listening to a radioplay of a Douglas Adams "Dirk Gently" novel, so the "holistic detective" thing is likewise running through my mind and Lije Baley certainly has some of that going on. Everything is relevant to the crime, every ounce of understanding of "white knowledge"*, because everything is interconnected and sometimes it takes unfamiliarity to be able to see relevance. (See my favorite quot...more
Al
Confession: I didn't really read this edition; the one I read only contained Caves of Steel and The Naked Sun, but I couldn't find that one in the listings. But I have read The Robots of Dawn some time ago, so I'm not really cheating, right?
So, what's it all about? Isaac Asimov basically invented the robot genre (among others) and nobody does it better. These were the early entries, introducing the intrepid detectives Lije Bailey (human) and R. Daneel Olivaw (robot). Asimov's writing may have...more
Ethan I. Solomon
When most people think of Asimov they think of Foundation and the books in that series. I think of The Caves of Steel and the books in The Robot Novels series. The protagonists are Elijah Bailey and R. Daneel Olivaw, who -SPOILER ALERT- also shows up in the final book of the Foundation series, if my memory serves me correctly.

Few books touched my imagination like The Caves of Steel and the other Elijah Bailey novels. The images burned their way into my mind. When I look to the sky I often wonde...more
Ronschae4
Great light mysteries with some insightful reflections on society. Asimov was BRILLIANT at using robots to reflect so clearly on the nature of humanity. A trick adeptly mastered in Star Trek The Next Generation's character "Data". Using a non-human... non-LIVING no less!... character to point out both the depth and the shallowness of humans. This gives Asimov much more freedom because the reader can't dismiss the perspective of the robot (culture, background, circumstance, parenting, etc.) Anywa...more
Joe
This trilogy is an incredibly well thought out series concerning robots and the future of earth. It's impressive that Asimov's ideas about robots as presented in the first book existed all the way back in the early fifties. This series is in the same universe as I, Robot and the Foundation trilogy. When you combine all the stories, it's a series that spans dozens of books and thousands of years of history. It's in this trilogy that Hari Seldon's ideas of psychohistory are supposed to have origin...more
Peter rock
GOOD BOOKS "aSIMOV WAS A GENIUS" WELL AHEAD OF HIS TIME BUT THEN AGAIN I LIVE AND TEACH IN bREVARD cOUNTY FLORIDA AT BREVARD COUNTY COLLEDGE THE WOMEN HERE ARE BEAUTIFUL THEY ARE ABUNDANT AND HERE BIS A PERSONAL THANK Y6OU TO THE YOUNG WOMEN WHO GAVE ME A MARLBORO LIGHT AT "iCHABOD'S BEACHSIDE 2210 FRONT STREET MELBOURNE FLORIDA 32901.. THANK YOU MAAM HOPE YOU ENJOY YOUR BLUE LIGHTER WELCOME TO THE LIGHTER GAME YER hottt SMILE WORLD I LIVE WHERE THE nASA SPACE PROGRAM IS I WANNA VACATION ON THE...more
Tally
A very nice little series of books - I read these over the course of several months, and it is still easy to follow when taking breaks in between, though I would have loved to have just torn through them all at once. They are great books - written a few decades ago but a very interesting take on society, in my opinion. There is still discrimination, taboo affairs, misunderstanding across culture - plus, of course, robots. Quite amazing stuff, and a must read for anyone who likes robots.
Samantha
3 great classic sci-fi novels. I find it hard to belive the caves of steel was written in the 50's!, his writting is so timeless.
The novels are all set in a future where human kind lives in vast enclosed cities, (caves of steel) and rarly venture outside.
Robots do all the hard work, outside, as humans don't trust them.
The naked sun is set on another world, where people (spacers) live in isolation in a house full of robots to cater to every need.


R2 Manning
I first read the robot trilogy back as a teenager. Asimov was, and remains, one of my favorite authors. Primarily because I thought that his work was very well thought out and grounded in some scientific reality. Of course he remains one of the "godfathers" of hard science fiction, particularly with respect to robots. I recent re-read the series, and still find it to be engaging, provocative, and thoroughly entertaining. But that is just me.
Lawrence Burry
This is my first read of Asimov's work. Each of the three successive stories begins rather dry and seems to drag on. After getting about half way through the story, it picks up to a decent pace and begins spiraling and almost racing towards the end. It took me some work to keep going through the slow parts, but it was well worth it in the end.
Daniel Montiel
I enjoyed the Foundation series so much, I wanted to go back a little and see what (retconned or not) came before. While I enjoyed these first 3 Robot books, I like the Foundation series much more. These are more human analysis, while Foundation to me feels more like politics and international (well, interstellar) politics.
Dave
These are fascinating murder mysteries where a brilliant but limited robot is teamed with a cranky but insightful human detective from Earth to solve murders here or another planet. Asimov at his best, I think. The writing perfectly crafted. A gem.
Mike
I only read The Caves of Steel. I read this back and high school to see how it help up. Not too bad. Some of the sciences seems retro and futuristic since it was written in the 50s. I still enjoyed it though as a murder mystery set in the future.
elise
The caves of steel is the other book in this series, but later I think there were one or two more books added to this series. It's been so long since I read these books. I wonder if I read them again if I would still like them.
Rich
I read Caves of Steel and the Naked Sun many years ago. I wanted to read them again. My version of the book doesn't have Robots of Dawn so I have not read that yet.

While the writing style is dated, I still loved them.
Dad
This is the acclaimed Robot series by Asimov. You should read these first, then Prelude to Foundation, then Forward the Foundation, then read the Foundation Series. They tie in in chronological order.
Gloria
I loved the sci fi aspect but the best part of each novel was the bond between the Human and the Android. Many of the authors Science Fiction terminology is used in todays science fact...
Kristi
I just love that Isaac Asimov. He's brilliant. Good characters, good science, engrossing stories. Every one of these books were solid and well worth the 4-star rating I gave them.
Marcy
Jul 20, 2010 Marcy is currently reading it  ·  review of another edition
I love, love, love Isaac Asimov. I've read loads of his non-fiction and some fiction, but have always wanted to read this trilogy.
Tracey
Isaac Asimov has an interesting take on human psychology, and shows it through the interaction of robots and humans in his stories.
Barbara
I read these in my youth, and then when my son was a teenager, went back and re-read them, just for fun.
Carlyn
Love Asimov and his ability to create future worlds, mystery and good old fashioned sci-fi.
Maria
Cleverly written and witty. I love the humanity that is illustrated. Great book so far.
Kathryn
I found this work thought provoking. The "police procedural" aspect was satisfying.
Azariphale
This is classic stuff. set up a lot of straight genre books.
Andy
the three main stories - should still read Robot Visions though
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Isaac Asimov's Robot Series/Daneel Olivaw Series 1 3 Jul 21, 2013 07:03AM  
  • Inferno (Isaac Asimov's Caliban, #2)
  • The Legacy of Heorot (Heorot #1)
  • The Age of the Pussyfoot
  • Outward Bound
  • The Giants Novels (Giants, #1-3)
  • Trader to the Stars
  • The Beast Without
  • Norby, the Mixed-Up Robot (Norby, #1)
  • Falkenberg's Legion  (Falkenberg's Legion, #2)
  • The Lost Swords: The Second Triad (Lost Swords, #4-6)
  • A Fall of Moondust
  • The Hitchhiker's Trilogy (Hitchhiker's Guide, #1-3)
  • Galactic Patrol (Lensman, #3)
  • Partners In Necessity (Liaden Universe, #8-10)
  • A Piece Of My Heart
  • City Life
  • Answer as a Man
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Isaac Asimov was a Russian-born, American author, a professor of biochemistry, and a highly successful writer, best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books.

Professor Asimov is generally considered the most prolific writer of all time, having written or edited more than 500 books and an estimated 90,000 letters and postcards. He has works published in nine of the te...more
More about Isaac Asimov...
Foundation (Foundation, #1) I, Robot (Robot, #0.1) Foundation and Empire (Foundation, #2) Second Foundation (Foundation, #3) The Foundation Trilogy (Foundation, #1-3)

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