Furies of Calderon (Codex Alera, #1)
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Furies of Calderon (Codex Alera #1)

by
4.11 of 5 stars 4.11  ·  rating details  ·  43,537 ratings  ·  1,961 reviews
In the realm of Alera, where people bond with the furies-elementals of earth, air, fire, water and metal, fifteen-year-old Tavi struggles with his lack of furycrafting. But when his homeland erupts in chaos-when rebels war with loyalists and furies clash with furies-Tavi's simple courage will turn the tides of war.
Mass Market Paperback, 504 pages
Published June 28th 2005 by Ace (first published 2004)
more details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about Furies of Calderon, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about Furies of Calderon

A Game of Thrones by George R.R. MartinThe Hobbit & The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. TolkienThe Name of the Wind by Patrick RothfussThe Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. LewisThe Eye of the World by Robert Jordan
The Best Epic Fantasy
34th out of 2,189 books — 14,983 voters
Mistborn by Brandon SandersonThe Name of the Wind by Patrick RothfussHarry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by J.K. RowlingThe Way of Kings by Brandon SandersonThe Golden Compass by Philip Pullman
Most Interesting Magic System
22nd out of 1,402 books — 4,728 voters


More lists with this book...

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 3,000)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  rating details
Carly

**Edit: The original review discussed Codex Alera's rather entertaining "origin story," which involved a flamewar, a bet, Pokemon, and the Roman legions.
Because this is "author behavior" that is not discussed in the book, it may not be in line with the impressively subjective new policies of GR.
I don't want to break these shiny new rules, so I am deleting most of the fun parts of this review.
My original review is posted over at booklikes--you can take a look at it there, if you want. Sorry abou...more
Mike Malaspina
Aug 03, 2007 Mike Malaspina rated it 5 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: Anyone
Shelves: fantasy
Furies of Calderon is your typical fantasy epic. Swords, sorcery, world turning upheaval, the blackest of evil and noblest of good. Only, the true hero of the story is not only powerless... Because that's been done before. No, the true hero is now only powerless, he's the ONLY powerless character. Even the other lowly farm hands can command boulders to simply pull themselves out of crop fields.

The savage Marat barbarians all have years of fighting experience from birth and great mighty beasts wh...more
Kaila
This review is also available on my blog, Stumptown Books.

I admit that I made a huge mistake by reading this novel before any of The Dresden Files. At the time I was shuffling through my Kindle library and I had just finished one or two urban fantasy novels. I was not in the mood for another one, so I thought, Hey! How about The Furies of Calderon!? Oh poor unwitting me, picking it up, all in good faith.

My first problem with this book is where the premise came from. Although I could not find an...more
April
First of all... I consider Jim Butcher to be a very talented writer, and I have greatly enjoyed the Dresden Files for a number of years. So when reading my complaints, you must also keep in mind that, having read all of the Dresden Files books more than once, I had a certain level of expectation that needed to be met.

They weren't. With the exception of a few short scenes in the beginning and in the middle, this first book in the Codex Alera was very, very subpar. It's not even all that long and...more
Stephen
4.0 stars. Great, well developed characters, an excellent magic system and wonderful world-building and plot pacing. Appears to be the start of a compelling series. Will defintely read the next books in the series.
Mpauli
Entering the Codex Alera series you're introduced to some very familiar tropes, but also to some very new ideas.
On the familiar side, there is a coming-of-age plot for one of the main characters, there is a political power struggle and a lot of action and battle scenes.
On the other hand, the society is somewhere between the typical medieval setting and the Roman Empire. This is fresh enough for me. The most prominent idea would be the furies, elemental creatures that are bound to almost every hu...more
Rob
Executive Summary: A fun but trope-heavy fantasy story that combines a Lost Roman Legion with Pokemon. Yeah, you read that right.

Audio book: I've long heard both good and bad things about Kate Reading. I actually got to meet her last year for the A Memory of Light book tour as she and her husband both live near me, but had never listened to a book by her before now.

Personally I think she's a really good reader. However, she may not be well suited for this book as it has many male characters (the...more
Twyla
I am shocked at how many people actually really liked this novel. The pacing was awful, the characters were flat and there were too many (often I couldn't tell who was on which side) - and the lame novice-to-hero progression of several characters was painfully uncreative. The only good parts were parts where the men spoke a little like Dresden (Butcher's other major series' protagonist). The one witch was creepy enough, and the monsters were pretty cool, but that seems to be Butcher's general st...more
Jim
An interesting series from the creator of the Dresden files. This is more of an epic fantasy with a really interesting magic. The characters were well done & I especially liked all the different creatures. Very interesting world & inhabitants with logical politics & problems.

That said, I had a few problems with the story, especially at the end. (view spoiler)...more
Tom
5+ stars to an awesome start to a series. Not sure how the rest of the series is going to compete with the start of it but I am looking forward to see where it goes. Especially since my friend says they get better.

Epic fantasy adventure story of Tavi. Tavi is a boy born without any furies and is looked upon by many in his realm as a freak. In the realm of Alera people have furies which allow then to control earth, water, air, fire metal in some way or another. Some are very strong and some not s...more
Justin
I read this book after I ran out of Dresden Files. Jim's little blurb at the end of his books had convinced me to give it a whirl. Let it be known, this is not to the caliber of The Dresden Files. It is a good book none the less. The story follows several characters in the world of Alera, who find themselves intertwined together in a land on the brink of war. This is a book of themes. Bravery, honor, love, family and sacrifice are all themes predominately displayed through out the story. Alera i...more
Jon
May 02, 2013 Jon added it
Recommended to Jon by: Science Fiction & Fantasy July 2010 Selection
Lightreads
So at the end of a lot of the Harry Dresden books there's this author biography that talked about how Butcher has loved epic fantasy since he was a wee thing, and how he wrote it for years but never got published, and it was urban fantasy that broke him into print. But what he really loves is epic fantasy, because he imprinted on Lord of the Rings and he just, OMG, he loves it.

Which tells you most of what you need to know about this series. Epic fantasy where the good guys win through ever-mount...more
Kevin Xu
worst fantasy book ever, too many books like this out in the fantasy genre out there! too many tropes! so formulaic of a story! the first line on the back cover tells the whole plot to the series! please stop writing books like these! if this was written in the late 70s or the early 80s, then it would have worked a lot better and fresher

I only read about 150 pages into the book and stopped
Richard
Feb 12, 2013 Richard rated it 4 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: Fans of epic fantasy and/or the Dresden Files
I finished all six volumes in Jim Butcher’s Codex Alera series, so I’m writing one review to cover the whole set. Regardless of which of the books this review is attached to, if you want to read this epic saga, start with the first book: Furies of Calderon . I’ve also read all fourteen of the full-length books in his Dresden Files, and there are some interesting points of comparison.

First and foremost, this is a well-crafted and engrossing tale — definitely worth reading.

The tale follows the lif...more
Nimrod Daniel
I became a fan of Jim Butcher after reading books 3 in The Dresden Files series, which was superb. Codex Alera is totally different than the Dresden series, and Furies of Calderon proved for once and for all that the author is much more important than THE great idea (if you don't know what I'm talking about, so this book was conceived as a result of a bet. While Butcher was trying to prove his point that the author has a greater role in creating a good book than the importance of thinking about...more
Jeffrey
May 03, 2010 Jeffrey rated it 5 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: fantasy fans
There is something about this book that keeps drawing back to re read it again and again -- i guess because it a really good fun read
Lilli Perspice
Like so many others, I came across Furies of Calderon through reading Jim Butcher’s Dresden Files. I read a lot of fantasy and consider Jim Butcher to be a fine writer, so I thought, why not?

Well, having read it, I can come up with a few reasons why not.

First, I was disappointed by the pretty standard medieval fantasy world and lack of originality in the creation of its peoples. The Alerans have furies--basically elementals of earth, air, fire, water, metal and wood--to do their bidding. The o...more
Chris
Codex Alera 1: Furies of Calderon by Jim Butcher

As you probably have noticed by now, I am a huge fan of Jim Butcher's Dresden Files series. The books are fun reads - fast-paced, gritty and realistic, while still maintaining that a tarnished patina of fantasy about them. They have a great narrative voice and I could read them the same way I eat a bag of Doritos - all in one sitting, unsure of how it happened, but with less orange Cheez (tm) on my fingers. I know for a fact that as long as Jim But...more
Jonathan

So...imagine you take Roman people, customs and building designs and then insert them in a magical world of strange creatures and savages. Then say you give every 'Roman' the ability to summon elemental spirits called Furies to 'craft' fire, water, earth, air, wood and metal. That's more or less what this book is.

I had read Furies of Calderon before and not enjoyed it anywhere near as much as I did now. I think the type of fantasy had to grow on me. It was sort of G.R.R Martin in parts, sort of...more
Belmanoir
Mild spoilers within:

Ok, this book was amazing. First of all, the worldbuilding was SO well done---not a single infodump in the whole book. On top of that, it was brilliantly plotted---5 POVs seamlessly woven together with each one being incredibly suspenseful and each character's plot fitting into the larger arc with a satisfying click. There was seriously not a single place in this book where I wasn't dying to know what was going to happen on the next page. Just reading this book and looking a...more
Martin Belcher
May 27, 2012 Martin Belcher rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to Martin by: Anna-louise
Shelves: read-in-2012
Wow, what a great read. I have to admit that this book has been gathering dust on my bookshelf for a year or two and it's thanks to both my friend, Anna and also the Fantasy group on Good reads (this book is the May 2012 group read) that I was encouraged to pick it up and start reading it.
I found myself immediately immersed in a world where most people have special powers called 'Furies' linked to nature and elements, the main character, Tavi a young boy growing up on a stead hold (farm stead) i...more
Ranting Dragon
http://www.rantingdragon.com/review-o...

Jim Butcher is best known for his bestselling urban fantasy series, The Dresden Files. In 2005, Butcher decided to expand his writing tool belt and released the first book of the epic fantasy Codex Alera series, Furies of Calderon.

Furies of Calderon takes place in a land known as Alera, ruled by the First Lord (emperor) and his various underlings. What makes the denizens of Alera unique is the fact that they have access to a magic known as fury-crafting, w...more
Callista
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Miquel Codony
He leído 10 libros de Jim Butcher, podemos decir que tengo un "sweet spot" por el autor pero... este es el mejor. Ha superado mis expectativas. Ideal para fans de George RR Martin y de Brandon Sanderson. Incluye bastantes ideas convencionales del género pero retuerce muchas de ellas y las ejecuta impecablemente. Gran oído para los diálogos. Adictivo como poco que haya leído últimamente. Aventura pura. Ansioso por seguir con la serie.
Kaitlin
This was more of a 4.5* book being a thrill ride the entire way through. I loved the fast-paced tempo of this story line and the way that it touts along as its such an easy read even though it's so long.

This story is set in a fantasy world where the people all have furies, spirit-like creatures who relate to an element and who can be controlled by their human counterparts to varying degrees of power. Some people have very limited use of their furies whilst others have a strong control over them...more
Samuel Vega
Well. I was definitely surprised by this story...

There were parts that I liked a lot, but there were also parts that were just awful. Obviously everyone has different taste and I can see why people could love this book, but for me a lot of it ended up being a chore to get through.

I don't want to get into too many specifics since I think it might give a bit too much away. And to be honest, this book is sort of predictable anyways so there's that.

Basically, I think if the story had solely follow...more
Chris
All in all, I enjoyed this one. It had a promising beginning, got a bit long through the middle, but then ended well.

The first thing to understand is that this is not The Dresden Files. It does not even have the same feel as that series. It's definitely a more structured story. It's a more traditional fantasy, though with a unique and interesting magic system. It doesn't have the wit and charm that is Harry Dresden and company.

That stated, it's a good work of fantasy in its own right. It actual...more
Lance Greenfield
I was just about to start reading the Game of Thrones series, when a friend in Denver asked me if I had read the Codex Alera series. I must be easily distracted, because I picked up this first volume of the series and started reading. Although I am sure that Game of Thrones makes for excellent reading, I am quite happy that I got my nose into the land of Alera.

The book starts with Amara, who is a young "Cursor" and a leading character in this excellent story, riding atop a gargant bull into enem...more
Sketch MacQuinor
I read this book because of my love of Butcher's other series, "The Dresden Files." I went through all the Dresdens and my friend Houston was kind enough to lend me his copy of this, the first book in this series.

This book pissed me off. I couldn't give up on it.

I don't normally like sword-and-sorcery fantasy. It's generally too stilted and lacks a sense of whimsey, or a sense of whimsey that doesn't feel like it was made for a middle-school mindset. Nobody but Terry Pratchett can be Terry Pratc...more
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 99 100 next »
  • Covenants (Borderlands, #1)
  • Beyond the Shadows (Night Angel, #3)
  • Theft of Swords (The Riyria Revelations, #1-2)
  • Imager's Challenge (Imager Portfolio, #2)
  • The Summoner (Chronicles of the Necromancer, #1)
  • Night of Knives (Malazan Empire, #1)
  • The Briar King (Kingdoms of Thorn and Bone, #1)
  • House of Blades (The Traveler's Gate Trilogy, #1)
  • The Red Knight (The Traitor Son Cycle, #1)
  • The Dragon's Path (The Dagger and the Coin, #1)
  • The Curse of Chalion (Chalion, #1)
  • The Spirit Thief (The Legend of Eli Monpress, #1)
  • Warbreaker (Warbreaker, #1)
  • The Dresden Files:  Storm Front, Volume 1:  The Gathering Storm
10746
Jim Butcher is the author of the Dresden Files, the Codex Alera, and a new steampunk series, the Cinder Spires. His resume includes a laundry list of skills which were useful a couple of centuries ago, and he plays guitar quite badly. An avid gamer, he plays tabletop games in varying systems, a variety of video games on PC and console, and LARPs whenever he can make time for it. Jim currently resi...more
More about Jim Butcher...
Storm Front (The Dresden Files #1) Fool Moon (The Dresden Files #2) Grave Peril (The Dresden Files #3) Summer Knight (The Dresden Files #4) Death Masks (The Dresden Files #5)

Share This Book

“The course of history is determined not by battles, by sieges, or usurpation, but by the individuals. The strongest army is, at its most basic level, a collection of individuals. Their decisions, their passions, their foolishness, and their dreams shape the years to come. If there is any lesson to be learned from history, it is that all too often the fate of armies, of cities, of entire realms rests upon the actions of one person's decision, good or bad, right or wrong, big or small, can unwittingly change the world.
But history can be quite the slattern. One never knows who that person is, where he might be, or what decision he might male.
It is almost enough to make me believe in destiny.”
46 likes
“Because a sound tree doesn't have bad roots, Amara. No enterprise of greatness
begins with treachery, with lying to the people who trust and love you”
38 likes
More quotes…