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Realism

3.87 of 5 stars 3.87  ·  rating details  ·  71 ratings  ·  2 reviews
Setting Realism in its social and historical context, this title discusses the crucial paradox posed by Realist works of art - notably in the revolutionary paintings of Courbet, the works of Manet, Degas and Monet, of the Pre-Raphaelites and other English, American, German and Italian Realists.
Paperback, 288 pages
Published March 30th 1972 by Penguin Books (first published March 30th 1971)
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Caterina Pierre
Excellent of course. The one-star deduction is for the very dry Epilogue that was published without images. No real footnotes; must have been a publisher's decision years ago that would not fly today in a scholarly book. However if you want to write about the style it's a must-read, and it hasn't really been replaced or surpassed.
AC
May 02, 2012 AC is currently reading it
Shelves: art, modernism

This book is out of the same series as John Shearman's Mannerism, which MonicaMc loves so much [but which I haven't read yet] - the Penguin Art and Architecture: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=pd_lpo_k2...
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Linda Nochlin is an American art historian, university professor and writer. A prominent feminist art historian, she is best known as a proponent of the question "Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?", in an essay of the same name published in 1971.

Her critical attention has been drawn to investigating the ways in which gender affects the creation and apprehension of art, as evidenced by he
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More about Linda Nochlin...
Women, Art, And Power And Other Essays The Body in Pieces: The Fragment as a Metaphor of Modernity The Politics Of Vision: Essays On Nineteenth-century Art And Society Courbet Representing Women

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“The artist striving for truth or sincerity had to guard his spontaneous vision against distortion or alteration by aesthetic conventions or preconceptions.” 0 likes
“The works of the Impressionists, as much as those of any medieval craftsman or renaissance Humanist, are related to a world view, a context of interdependent beliefs and ideas about what is good and bad, true and false, the nature of existence and the means for investigating it. There are no ‘value vacuums’ in human history, no ‘intermediary periods’, only periods which are more or less unified, more or less amenable to the procedures, and temperaments, of historians.” 0 likes
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