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The Works of Epictetus Consisting of His Discourses, in Four Books, the Enchiridion and Fragments
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The Works of Epictetus Consisting of His Discourses, in Four Books, the Enchiridion and Fragments

4.50  ·  Rating Details  ·  8 Ratings  ·  3 Reviews
Elizabeth Carter's version of Epictetus has outlived every English prose translation of its day, and has admirably held its ground with readers. While Marcus Aurelius has had a series of English versions, the complete works of Epictetus have had but this one, reproduced in four different editions. Even of the "Enchiridion," or Manual, of which there have been at least five ...more
434 pages
Published 1865
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Brian
Oct 06, 2014 Brian rated it really liked it
The main point of the Discourses can be summed up in a couple sentences: If it is under your control, change it. If it's not under your control, don't worry about it.

There's more--a lot more--of course, but nearly everything comes back to that. Epictetus keeps referring to the Reason, which is the essential central aspect of humanity, the one thing that makes you you. Therefore, that is what is under an individual's control and what they should work on, and everything else should be endured. De
...more
Bob Nichols
Epictetus constructs an ideal human and then tells us that reason should mold us to fit that ideal. As to what constitutes the ideal, he advises that we must concern ourselves with only that which is in our power, not what is outside our power to control. This advice is anchored in a view of the cosmos that has a mind of its own. Given this fated universe, our task is to go with the flow, not fight it, and to focus only on what we have control over. Importantly, this means our desires and concer ...more
Daniel
Sep 10, 2011 Daniel rated it really liked it
Read the Enchiridion only. Carter translation freely available at the MIT Classics website: http://classics.mit.edu/Epictetus/epi...
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Epictetus was a Greek Stoic philosopher. He was probably born a slave at Hierapolis, Phrygia (present day Pamukkale, Turkey), and lived in Rome until his exile to Nicopolis in northwestern Greece, where he lived most of his life and died. His teachings were noted down and published by his pupil Arrian in his Discourses. Philosophy, he taught, is a way of life and not just a theoretical discipline. ...more
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